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CORNELL UNIVERSITY OFFICIAL PUBLICATION 
VOLUME 34 : SEPTEMBER 1, 1942 : NUMBER 5 



Announcement of 



Cornell University -New York Hospital 

School of Nursing 
/ i 

pC for 1942-43 




AT 525 EAST 68th STREET, NEW YORK, N. Y. 



Requests for further information should be ad- 
dressed to The Director, Cornell University-New 
York Hospital School of Nursing, 525 East 68th 
Street, New York City. 

An application form will be sent upon request 
to prospective students able to satisfy the re- 
quirements for admission. 



CORNELL UNIVERSITY OFFICIAL PUBLICATION 
VOLUME 34 : SEPTEMBER 1, 1942 : NUMBER 5 



Announcement of 



Cornell University -New York Hospital 

School of Nursing 

for 1942-43 




AT 525 EAST 68th STREET, NEW YORK, N. Y. 



CORNELL UNIVERSITY OFFICIAL PUBLICATION 

PUBLISHED BY CORNELL UNIVERSITY AT ITHACA, N. Y. 

Monthly in September, October, and November 
Semi-monthly, December to August inclusive 

[Entered as second-class matter, December 14, 1916, at the post office at 
Ithaca, New York, under the act of August 24, 1912] 




THE NEW YORK HOSPITAL, SOUTH VIEW 



CALENDAR 

1943 
May 9 Sunday Second term ends 

May 10 Monday Third term begins 

May 30 Sunday Memorial Day, a holiday 

July 4 Sunday Independence Day, a holiday 

September 6 Monday Labor Day, a holiday 
September 25 Saturday Registration Day (First year 

students) 
September 26 Sunday Third term ends 
September 27 Monday Convocation. First term begins 
October 12 Tuesday Columbus Day, a holiday (except 

for first year students) 
November 25 Thursday Thanksgiving Day, a holiday 
December 25 Saturday Christmas Day, a holiday 



No classes will be held on the holidays noted above. 




LOBBY OF NURSES RESIDENCE 



GENERAL STATEMENT 
History 

CORNELL University-New York Hospital School of 
Nursing has the resources of two great institutions of 
learning, both of which have a long history and an envia- 
ble record of achievement in the fields of education and 
public welfare. 

Cornell University received its first endowment from the 
Federal Government's Educational Land Grant of 1862. 
The appropriation under the Morrill Act was to endow a 
college "where the leading object shall be ... to teach 
such branches of learning as are related to agriculture and 
the mechanical arts." This was the beginning of a remark- 
able system of higher education. It, however, received its 
greatest impetus through the vision and generosity of Ezra 
Cornell who, under the influence of Andrew D. White his 
colleague and later the first president, determined the form 
of the new University. In 1864 an agreement was reached 
with the Legislature of New York State which resulted in 
the founding of "a University of a new type, ... an insti- 
tution where any person can find instruction in any study. 
This combination of Federal, State, and private interests 
and resources is unique. It gives strength to the organiza- 
tion, broadens the aims and policies of the University, and 
extends the influence of its educational ideals. 

It is interesting to note how one school after another has 
been organized and made a unit of this educational system, 
the most recent of which is the School of Nursing which 
was added in July, 1942. 

The school, known until recently as The New York Hos- 
pital School of Nursing, was organized in 1877 as an inte- 
gral part of the New York Hospital, the second oldest 
hospital in America maintained by private endowment. 
George the Third of England granted the hospital its 
charter of incorporation on June 13, 1771, under the title 
of the Society of the Hospital in the City of New York in 

[7] 



America. In 1810 the title was changed to The Society of 
the New York Hospital by an Act of the New York 
Legislature. 

This hospital has the distinction of being the first insti- 
tution in America devoted to the care of the sick to give 
organized instruction to its nursing personnel. It was in 
1799 that Doctor Valentine Seaman, a scholarly man and 
prominent physician, organized a series of lectures com- 
bined with a course of practical instruction in the wards. 
This cannot be considered the beginning of the school, but 
it certainly formed the groundwork. 

In June, 1927, The New York Hospital completed an 
association with Cornell University Medical College. Five 
years later they moved to their present location on York 
Avenue, between sixty-eighth and seventy-first streets. 
The increased facilities thus made available contributed to 
the progressive development of the school of nursing and 
it seemed only a natural consequence that on its sixty-fifth 
anniversary it became a unit in a great university. 

The school is justly proud of its sixteen hundred gradu- 
ates among whom are many who have nation-wide recog- 
nition for their outstanding contributions in the various 
fields of nursing. 

Registration of the School 

The School of Nursing is registered by the Regents of the 
University of the State of New York and its graduates are 
eligible to take the state board examinations for license as 
registered professional nurses. 

The school is accredited by the National League of Nurs- 
ing Education which functions as the Department of Edu- 
cation of the American Nurses' Association. 

The hospital is approved by the American College of 
Surgeons and is a member of the American Hospital Asso- 
ciation. It is also approved for internships by the American 
Medical Association. 

Aims of the School of Nursing 

Nursing offers a challenge to young women with excep- 
tional personal and professional qualifications who are in- 

[8] 



terested in social welfare. The aim of Cornell University- 
New York Hospital School of Nursing is to prepare care- 
fully selected students in the fundamental principles of 
nursing in its various clinical aspects as applied to home, 
hospital, and other community services, with emphasis 
upon health teaching. The development of the individual 
student as a responsible member of civic and social life is a 
significant outcome of the program. 

Facilities for the School 

A special building for the school of nursing is adjacent 
to the hospital buildings. It provides adequate and well 
equipped class-rooms, laboratories, library, and recreation 
rooms as well as attractive and comfortable living accom- 
modations for students and faculty. 

Further necessary laboratory and library facilities are 
available through association with the Cornell University 
Medical College. 

The clinical facilities of The New York Hospital are un- 
surpassed for the care and study of patients. The hospital 
with a capacity of over one thousand beds admits all types 
of patients including medical, surgical, obstetric, gyne- 
cological, pediatric, and psychiatric, and the out-patient 
department provides ample opportunity for the study of 
ambulatory patients. 

Close cooperation with the Henry Street Visiting Nurse 
Service and other community agencies affords opportuni- 
ties for observation in a community nursing program. 

The social service department of The New York Hospital 
participates in the nursing course through the integration 
of social service in the program of study. 

Requirements for Admission 

Each applicant must present a qualifying certificate from 
the Board of Regents of the State of New York, applica- 
tion for which may be secured from the Bureau of Qualify- 
ing Certificates, State Education Department, Albany, 
New York, or it will be sent an applicant from the office 

[9] 



of the Director of the School of Nursing after application 
for admission to the school has been filed. 

Requirements for admission include the satisfactory com- 
pletion of two years of work in an accredited college. Stu- 
dents of unusual merit and promise who have less than the 
above requirement may be given special consideration. 

The following units of study in an accredited high school 
or a recognized preparatory school are required: 

English 4 units 

History 1 unit 

Civics y 2 unit 

Mathematics 2 units 

Algebra 1 unit 

Plane geometry 1 unit 

Science 2 units 

General science or biology. . . .1 unit 

Chemistry 1 unit 

Foreign language 3 units 

Three units of one language or two 

units of each of two 
Electives 3 l A units 

Total 16 units 

It is recommended that prospective students include in 
their college program basic courses in general chemistry or 
inorganic and organic chemistry, zoology or biology, and 
the social sciences. Emphasis is placed upon scholarship of 
applicants. All students should review arithmetic prior to 
admission. 

Besides these scholastic admission requirements appli- 
cants should be at least eighteen and not over thirty years 
of age and must present evidence of physical and personal 
fitness for nursing. 

A personal conference of the applicant and her parent or 
guardian with the Director of the School of Nursing is 
desirable and should be arranged after formal application 
has been submitted to the school. An appointment for an 
interview will be made upon request. 

At their own expense applicants must also present a re- 

[10] 



port from the Testing Service Division for Schools of Nurs- 
ing of the Psychological Corporation. Upon application to 
Cornell University-New York Hospital School of Nursing 
the card of application for admission to this examination 
will be forwarded to the applicant with necessary instruc- 
tions. 

The Admissions Committee takes into account all in- 
formation received from these various sources in judging 
the suitability of an individual for admission to the school 
of nursing. 

All applications for admission should be addressed to 
the Director, Cornell University-New York Hospital 
School of Nursing, 525 East Sixty-eighth Street, New 
York, New York. 

Citizenship Requirements 

According to the law of New York State every per- 
son admitted to the examination for license as registered 
nurse in New York State at the termination of her course of 
study must submit evidence that she is a citizen of the 
United States or has declared her intention of becoming a 
citizen. Such a license shall terminate and become void at 
the end of seven years from such declaration of intention 
if the holder has not become a citizen. 

Advanced Standing 

An applicant who has received her baccalaureate degree 
may have her time in the school reduced by two or four 
months if she maintains an average of 80 in theory and in 
practice provided this request is presented the last term of 
the second year. She must, however, continue to maintain 
this average in the third year. 

The Curriculum 

The three-year curriculum of the school of nursing is so 
planned as to give each student a thorough understanding 
of the basic sciences and principles underlying good nurs- 
ing and of the best methods to use in the care of the sick, 
in the prevention of disease, and in health education. 

[11] 




STUDENT CARES FOR CONVALESCENT PATIENT IN SOLARIUM 




CONVALESCENT CHILDREN RECEIVE DIRECTION IN PLAY 



Each of the three school years is divided into terms of 
sixteen weeks. 

During the first term and a half limited nursing practice 
is given in the pavilions of the hospital and the clinics of 
the out-patient department while a greater amount of time 
is spent in class and laboratory. In the subsequent seven and 
one-half terms the student's nursing practice increases in 
length of time and in responsibility. A sequence is planned 
to include the various types of clinical services during day, 
evening, and night periods, and an introduction to com- 
munity nursing in order that the student may acquire a 
more complete understanding of patients' needs. 

During these clinical terms each student is scheduled 
forty-eight hours a week which includes all class and 
nursing practice assignments. 

Scholarship Requirements for Promotion 
and Graduation 

The established system of grading is the numerical scale 
of 0-100 with 60 as the lowest passing grade. 

An average of 70 for a given term is required for promo- 
tion without condition. A grade of 70 is required in the 
course Introduction to Nursing Arts, and a grade of 80 in the 
course Drugs and Solutions. A grade below 70 in any clinical 
field of nursing practice places a student on major warning. 

Major warning is given the student if her term average 
is below 70. This must be removed by the end of the next 
term to insure further promotion. A student on major 
warning is ineligible to hold office in student organizations. 

A grade of incomplete (I) is assigned if the work of a 
course is not completed because of illness or unavoidable 
absence and if, in the judgment of the instructor, the stu- 
dent has shown evidence that she can complete the course 
satisfactorily in a reasonable length of time. 

A failure (F) in any given subject mav necessitate with- 
drawal from the school unless the student's scholarship 
is exceptional in other respects in which case repetition of 
the course may be recommended by the instructor. 

A cumulative average of 70 for three vears' work is re- 
quired for graduation. 

[13] 



General Administrative Policies 

Cornell University-New York Hospital School of Nurs- 
ing reserves the privilege of retaining in the school only 
those students who in the judgment of its faculty satisfy 
its requirements of scholarship, health, and personal 
suitability for the nursing profession. 

It also reserves the prerogative of changing its curric- 
ulum, educational policies, and fees as deemed necessary 
for the progressive development of the school. 

Registration and Orientation 

First-year students entering in the fall of nineteen hun- 
dred and forty-two must register at the school by ten 
o'clock on Saturday morning, September twenty-sixth; 
those entering in the fall of nineteen hundred and forty- 
three on Saturday, September twenty-fifth. 

A brief orientation program precedes formal instruction. 
During this time students have necessary physical exami- 
nations with Schick, Dick, and Mantoux tests, confer with 
faculty advisers, and secure uniforms, books, and other 
equipment. 

Degree and Diploma 

Upon satisfactory completion of the course all students 
will be granted a diploma in nursing and those students 
who enter the school with at least two years of college 
work acceptable to Cornell University will also receive 
the Degree of Bachelor of Science in Nursing. 



14 




THE GREEN DINING ROOM 




STUDY IN THE LIBRARY 



Fees 

First Year 

Matriculation Fee $11.00 

Administration Fee 20.00 

Tuition Fee 100.00 

Payable at registration $75-00 

Payable at beginning of second 

term, first year 25.00 

Laboratory Fee 25.00 

Chemistry Breakage (refundable if not 

used) 5.00 

Library Fee 2.00 

Health Service Fee 10.00 

Rental Laboratory Coats 1.00 

Second Year 

Tuition Fee $50.00 

Library Fee 1.50 

Health Service Fee 500 

Third Year 

Tuition Fee $50.00 

Library Fee 1.50 

Health Service Fee 5 00 

Graduation Fee — degree students 20.00 

($15-00 for diploma students) 
Payable at beginning of third term, third 
year. Refundable if student is not gradu- 
ated. 
Rental Public Health Uniforms 1.50 



$174.00 



56.50 



78.00 



Grand Total $308.50 

In addition to these fees students pay a Student Activity 
Fee of $5.25 each year which is collected by the class 
treasurer. 

[16] 



Maintenance and General Expenses 

The school of nursing provides maintenance and limited 

gratuitous care in case of illness. Each student is furnished 

with uniforms and caps which remain the property of the 

school. 

The following estimated expenses must be met by the 

student: 

1st yr. 2nd yr. 3rd yr. Optional 
1st term 

Uniform aprons, bibs, and 

accessories $22.00 $4.00 

Uniform shoes 8.50 8.50 

Uniform sweater 4.00 

Uniform cape $15-00 

Gymnasium suits 12.00 

Books, keys, bandage scis- 
sors, and miscellaneous 
supplies 20.00 $10.00 5-00 15-00 

Expenses for Public Health 

and other observations 5-00 5-00 55-00 



$71.50 $15.00 $72.50 $30.00 

None of the aforementioned articles should be purchased 
before admission to the school. Students should be pro- 
vided with an allowance for other personal needs deter- 
mined by individual requirements. A list of limited neces- 
sary personal equipment will be sent each prospective stu- 
dent when accepted for admission. For the three-year 
course the total cost to the student should not exceed four 
hundred and seventy-five dollars in addition to personal 
expenditures as determined by the student. 

Health Regulations and Service 

The school of nursing maintains a health service for its 
students. A well equipped infirmary with necessary staff is 
provided in the nurses' residence. A physical examination 
by the school physician with chest x-rays is required upon 
admission to the school and subsequent annual physical 
examinations will be given. 

[17] 



Vaccinations against typhoid fever and smallpox will be 
requested of all students before admission to the school. 
Schick and Dick tests and immunization for positive reac- 
tion to the Schick test will be required of all students be- 
fore or after admission to the school. Mantoux tests will 
be given during the pre-clinical period and for those who 
are negative will be repeated at regular intervals. 

Gratuitous infirmary care for minor illnesses will be 
limited to four weeks at any one time in the case of all stu- 
dents. For more serious illnesses students will be cared for 
gratuitously in the hospital for not more than two weeks 
at any one time for the first-year students, and not more 
than four weeks at any one time for second and third year 
students. Expenses for special nursing care and special 
therapies must be borne by the student or her family. 

Vacations and Other Absences 

During the first and second years a vacation of four 
weeks is given and during the third year one of two weeks. 
For first-year students one week's vacation is planned in 
the first term and three weeks during the third term. For 
all second-year students a vacation of four weeks is planned 
during the third term of the year. For third-year students a 
two weeks' vacation is given during the third term. A va- 
cation is not given in the third year to those students who 
have an exemption of time. 

All vacations are arranged by the school of nursing to 
conform to the requirements of the educational program 
and the fields in which clinical practice is obtained. 

Except for first-year students during their first term holi- 
days are observed only in connection with class schedules. 

As a result of absences the repetition of a course of study 
or special examinations may be required; class registration 
may be changed and in necessary instances nursing prac- 
tice will have to be made up. 

Loans and Scholarships 

Student loan funds have been established for those who 
need financial aid and show promise in nursing. A limited 
number of scholarships covering first year tuition fees are 

[18] 



available to college students on the basis of need and 
scholastic standing. 

Application should be made in writing to the Director 
of the School. 

Extracurricular Opportunities 

Believing that the education of young women today 
must include activities relating to healthful social rela- 
tionships, generous provision for this development in the 
life of the student has been made. 

The beautiful fireproof, sixteen-story residence, erected 
adjacent to the hospital buildings, is the center for these 
activities. Every effort has been made in its construction 
and equipment to provide for the normal and healthy life 
of students and faculty. 

Each of the eight student residence floors contains at- 
tractively furnished single bedrooms with lavatories, 
ample common baths, showers, and toilet facilities, a com- 
mon sitting-room with adjoining kitchenette for informal 
gatherings, and a laundryette. 

Comfortable lounges, reading, reception and dining- 
rooms are on the first and ground floors. 

For further recreational activities, a large, well equipped 
gymnasium, game-rooms, tennis courts, and porches are 
available. Arrangements for the use of an indoor swimming 
pool are made. 

To insure the full benefit and proper use of these facilities, 
well-qualified instructors are appointed to direct the social 
and recreational activities of the school. 

School Government 

The school of nursing has a cooperative government in 
which the students take an active part. A student organi- 
zation has been established and functions with the Faculty 
Committee on Student Extracurricular Activities in all 
matters relating to social and professional conduct and 
discipline. 

An annual student activities fee of $5-25 is required and 
collected by each class. 

[19; 




A ROOM OF HER OWN 




SUNDAY MORNING BREAKFAST IN THE FLOOR SITTING ROOM 



THE CURRICULUM 

First Year 

Class and Approx- 
Labora- imate 
tory Hours 
Hours Practice 
(Orientation — 28 hours, includes Personal 
Hygiene — 8 hours and Personality Study 

—6 hours) 28 

Anatomy 60 

Chemistry 57 

Microbiology 68 

Physiology 45 

History of Nursing 24 

Elementary Psychology 30 

Psychology of Deviate Behavior 15 

Introduction to Nursing Arts 125 309 

Professional Adjustments 1 15 

Nutrition and Cookery 30 

Diet Therapy 30 

Social and Economic Aspects of Health and 

Disease 30 

Pharmacology and Therapeutics 30 

Medicine 37 

Communicable Diseases 23 

Medical Nursing 15 480 

Surgery 45 

Surgical Nursing 15 480 

Totals 722 1269 



[21] 



Second Year 

Class and Approx- 

Labora- imate 

tory Hours 

Hours Practice 

Medical Nursing 192 

Diet Therapy Practice 192 

Operative Technique 15 359 

Pediatrics 30 

Pediatric Nursing 30 698 

Obstetrics and Gynecology 30 

Obstetric and Gynecological Nursing 30 698 

Development of Behavior in Children 30 

Totals 165 2139 

Third Year 

Medical Nursing 8 309 

Diet Therapy Practice 96 

Surgical Nursing 8 406 

Emergency Nursing 22 

Professional Adjustments II 15 ... 

Psychiatry 30 

Psychiatric Nursing 30 708 

Family and Community Health 20 

Community Nursing Practice 96 

Out-Patient Nursing Practice 268 

Private Patient Nursing Practice 192 

Elective 192 

Totals 133 2267 

Grand Total Hours 1020 5675 

Two or more hours a week of bedside instruction and individual 
conferences, which approximate a total of 244 hours, are included in 
practice assignments. 

See Description of Courses in Physical Education. 



[22] 



DESCRIPTION OF COURSES 
Preclinical Sciences 

100. Anatomy 

This course includes both gross and microscopical anat- 
omy. The gross anatomy is taught by lectures, demonstra- 
tions, and student dissection of the cadaver. The micro- 
scopical work is directly correlated with the gross dissec- 
tion and includes a detailed study of prepared slides. Signi- 
ficant embryological information is included in the lec- 
tures. 

60 Hours, First Year 

Dr. Hinsey, Dr. Yntema, Dr. Hammond 

101. Chemistry 

A course designed to acquaint students with the funda- 
mental principles of inorganic and physiological chemistry 
with special application to nursing practice. Studies in the 
general composition of the blood and urine, and in the di- 
gestion and utilization of foods are included. Lectures, 
recitations, and laboratory. 

57 Hours, First Year 

Dr. DuVigneaud, Miss Rynbergen, Dr. Chandler 

102. Microbiology 

The study of the habits and morphology of microorgan- 
isms emphasizing those of pathogenic character; sources, 
modes, and prevention of infection; disinfection and asep- 
sis; the more important tissue changes occurring in the 
healing process, infections, and neoplasms; clinical micro- 
scopy of the blood and blood grouping; kidney function 
and urinalysis. Practical demonstrations and applications 
are made which relate directly to nursing. The blood group 
of each student is ascertained and recorded. Lectures, reci- 
tations, and laboratory. 

68 Hours, First Year 

Dr. Barr, Dr. Stillman, Miss Watson 

[23] 



103- Pharmacology and Therapeutics 

A course designed to acquaint the student with the fun- 
damental weights, measures, terms, and symbols used in 
the preparation and administration of drugs, common anti- 
septics, disinfectants, and other solutions. A study of im- 
portant and commonly used drugs, their preparation, dos- 
age, administration, physiological and therapeutic ac- 
tions, idiosyncrasies, cumulative and minor toxic symp- 
toms, antidotes and emergency treatments. Emphasis is 
placed on the accurate administration of drugs and the 
careful observation of their effects through supervised 
practice in nursing courses. 

30 Hours, First Year 
Dr. Cattell, Miss Daum 

104. Physiology 

This course is designed to give a basic understanding of 
the functions of the normal human body as an essential 
prerequisite to the study of health and nutrition and the 
pathological changes due to disease. Lectures, recitations, 
laboratory, and demonstrations. 

45 Hours, First Year 

Dr. DuBois, Miss Rynbergen 

Medical Nursing 

110. Medicine 

Medical aspects of diseases are considered in these lec- 
tures and clinics. Material presented will supplement, em- 
phasize, and interpret required reading covering etiology, 
sources of infection, symptomatology, usual course, pathol- 
ogy, complications, treatment, prognosis, and prevention. 

37 Hours, First Year 
Dr. Barr and staff 

111. Communicable Diseases 

A study of communicable diseases, including tuberculo- 
sis. Special emphasis is placed upon etiology, modes of 
transmission, and prevention. Lectures and clinics. 

23 Hours, First Year 
Dr. Barr and staff 

[24] 




NUTRITION AND COOKERY CLASS 




SURGICAL TECHNIQUE DEMONSTRATED TO FIRST-YEAR STUDENTS 



112. Principles of Medical Nursing Including Communi- 

cable Disease Nursing 
Through lectures, clinics, and demonstrations, students 
are taught principles and methods of nursing as applied to 
the care of medical patients. In the third year emphasis is 
placed upon managerial and teaching problems and the 
newer methods of treatment are presented. 

15 Hours, First Year 
8 Hours, Third Year 
Miss Lyons 
Miss Daum, Miss Daniels 

113. Practice of Medical Nursing Including Communicable 

Disease Nursing 
Supervised practice and study of the application of medi- 
cal nursing principles and methods to the care of patients 
on the medical pavilions of the hospital. In addition stu- 
dents study and practice medical aseptic nursing as related 
to the care of patients suffering from communicable dis- 
eases including tuberculosis. Practice includes care of pa- 
tients and managerial experience during day, evening, and 
night. Demonstrations and conferences. 

981 Hours, First, Second, and Third Years 
(Includes 384 hours of communicable disease nursing) 
Miss Lyons, Miss Daum, Miss Daniels, Miss Lalime, 
Miss Vernstrom and staff 

114. Practice in Care of Private Patients 

Application of principles of medical and surgical nursing 
to the care of private patients. 

192 Hours, Third Year 

Miss Moffatt and staff 

Nursing 

120. Orientation. 

This course is designed to give the beginning student a 
general conception of the field of nursing; the responsibili- 
ties and obligations of each individual in choosing the pro- 
fession; the importance of general conduct in building up 
the right habits of living and attitudes of the nurse. In- 

[26] 



eludes lectures in personal hygiene and personality study, 
emphasizing the importance of physical and mental health 
especially as it relates to the life of the nurse and is re- 
flected in her work. 

28 Hours, First Year 

Miss Parker, Miss Kennedy, Miss Frost, 

Dr. Doty, Dr. Tyndall 

121. a. Introduction to Nursing Arts 

A course designed to give the student a basic understand- 
ing of the principles of nursing with emphasis upon her at- 
titude toward her patient, the existing social relationships, 
the physical requirements for the proper care of patients, 
and the procedures found most helpful for the promotion 
of health. 

125 Hours, First Year 
Miss Stone 

121. b. Practice of Elementary Nursing 

The application of the theories of nursing in laboratory 
practice, in the surgical supply room, and in the actual 
care of convalescent patients in the pavilions and out- 
patient department of the hospital. 

309 Hours, First Year 
Miss Stone, Miss Zorn 

122. History of Nursing 

A survey of the historical development of nursing from 
its early conception to modern times. Lectures and panel 
discussions. 

24 Hours, First Year 
Miss Frost 

123- Professional Adjustments I 

A general consideration of fundamental ethical and phil- 
osophical principles and their application to problems 
which arise in the practice of nursing. An attempt is made 
to coordinate this course closely with each course of nurs- 
ing practice through class discussions of pertinent prob- 
lems. Lectures and conferences. 

15 Hours, First Year 

Miss Frost and Special Lecturers 

[27] 



124. Professional Adjustments II 

Through a general survey of the nursing held, the stu- 
dent has an opportunity to learn the trends and advances in 
the profession; the need and opportunities for specialized 
preparation; the importance and types of legislation; the 
activities of professional organizations and the obligations 
of their members. Lectures and conferences. 

15 Hours, Third Year 
Miss Parker and Special Lecturers 

125- Emergency Nursing 

This course supplements the instruction in nursing and 
deals with the application of these principles to emergency 
situations in the home and community. Lectures and 
demonstrations. First Aid certificate granted by American 
Red Cross. 

22 Hours, Third Year 
Dr. Redden 

See description of other courses in nursing relating to 
specific clinical fields. 

Nutritiox 

130. Nutrition and Cookery 

An elementary course in normal adult nutrition and in 
food preparation. The nutrition requirements in childhood 
and in pregnancy are discussed during the student's prac- 
tice on pediatric and obstetric services. 

30 Hours, First Year 
Miss Rynbergen 

131. Diet Therapy 

A course designed to present the underlying principles in 
treatment of disease by means of special dietaries given 
concurrently with the lectures in Medical and Surgical 
Diseases. Lectures, recitations, and laboratory. 

30 Hours, First Year 
Miss Rynbergen 

132. Practice of Diet Therapy 

The application of the principles of diet therapy in super- 

[28] 




TENNIS IS A HEALTHFUL RECREATION 



vised practice on the pavilions in the hospital and in the 
out-patient clinic. Conferences and case studies. 
288 Hours, Second and Third Years 
Miss Gillam, Miss Rynbergen, Miss Krause, 
Miss Dodds, Miss Murray, Miss Thomas 

Obstetrics and Gynecology 

140. Obstetrics and Gynecology 

This course deals with physiological and pathological 
changes during pregnancy, labor, and puerperium; the care 
of the normal newborn; the nutrition of the mother and 
baby; the prevention of complications; the social signifi- 
cance of infant and maternal mortality; the relation of 
obstetrics to various gynecological conditions; the results 
of infection and tumor growth and the required surgical 
interference and operative treatment. Lectures. 

30 Hours, Second Year 
Dr. Stander and staff 
Miss Rynbergen 

141. Principles of Obstetric and Gynecological Nursing 
This course emphasizes the importance of prenatal in- 
struction, observation, and care; infant, obstetric, and 
gynecological nursing procedure with particular attention 
to infections and their special therapy. Classes, demonstra- 
tions, and conferences. 

30 Hours, Second Year 

Miss Hickcox, Miss Boyle, Miss Darbois, 

Miss Geuss, Miss Klein, Miss Lewis 

142. Practice of Obstetric and Gynecological Nursing 
Under supervised practice in the pavilions, nurseries, 

operating rooms, labor and delivery rooms, and out- 
patient department, students have the opportunity to 
observe and care for infants and obstetric and gynecologi- 
cal patients. Nursing practice, case studies, and conferences. 
698 Hours, Second Year 

Miss Hickcox, Miss Darbois, Miss Geuss, Miss Klein, 
Miss Schmidt, Miss Walters and staff 
Miss Frost, Miss Boyle, and Miss Lewis 

[30] 



Pediatrics 

150. Pediatrics 

This course emphasizes the influence of social, economic, 
and medical contributions on normal growth and develop- 
ment. Through a study of representative diseases of in- 
fancy and childhood, the resulting effects on morbidity 
and mortality are shown. Lectures and clinics. 

30 Hours, Second Year 
Dr. Levine and staff 

151. Principles of Pediatric Nursing 

The basic principles in the care of well and sick infants 
and children are given together with the social, educa- 
tional, and nutritional aspects of their treatment and be- 
havior as normal children. Classes, conferences, and 
demonstrations. 

30 Hours, Second Year 

Miss Schubert, Miss Ferguson, Mrs. Overholser, 

Miss Schnetzer and staff 

152. Practice of Pediatric Nursing 

This consists of supervised experience in aseptic nursing 
methods in the care of infants and children in the pavilion, 
formula laboratory, premature nursery, and out-patient 
department. Case studies and conferences. 
698 Hours, Second Year 

Miss Schubert, Miss Ferguson, Miss Kelly, 
Mrs. Macintosh, Miss Schnetzer and staff 
Mrs. Overholser, Miss Correll, and Mrs. Meyer 

153. Development of Behavior in Children 

A study of the normal child and his behavior. The sus- 
ceptibility of the child's behavior responses to the various 
details of family life and of school will be emphasized. 
Lectures and recitations. 

30 Hours, Second Year 
Miss Whitley 

Personal Hygiene and Public Health 

Personal Hygiene 

(8 hours — Included in 120. Orientation.) 

[31] 



160. Physical Education 

Each student will be required to participate in regular 
physical exercise designed primarily to maintain positive 
health with emphasis upon posture and corrective meas- 
ures and to stimulate sportsmanship. 

64 Hours, Each Year 

Miss McDermott and Miss Leaning 

161. Social and Economic Aspects of Health and Disease 
A course of study given concurrently with the lectures on 

medical diseases emphasizing their social and economic 
aspects. It deals with the prevention of sickness and the 
promotion of health, with consideration of the contributing 
factors in home and community. Lectures and conferences. 

30 Hours, First Year 
Miss Frost, Miss Soule' 

162. Family and Community Health 

An introduction to the study of Public Health; local, 
state, and national programs. Discussion of the various 
types of public health nursing; scope, requirements, prep- 
aration. Lectures. 

20 Hours, Third Year 
Dr. Smillie, Miss Frost 

163- Community Nursing Principles and Practice 

Nursing practice in the out-patient department; visits of 

observation to community agencies; contact with the 

home through the social service department and public 

health nursing agencies in the community. 
268 Hours, Third Year 

Medical and Surgical Out-Patient Department 
Miss Frost, Miss Reid, Miss Abbott and staff 
Social Service Department, Miss Soule and staff 
96 Hours, Third Year 
Community Nursing 

Psychiatry 
170. Psychiatry 

A course of study designed to acquaint students with 
psychopathic conditions, their etiology, pathology, and 

[32] 



treatment. Included in this course is an historical survey of 

psychiatry and the mental hygiene movement, a discussion 

of the problems most frequently found in the different 

periods of human development: nursery school age, pre- 

puberty, adolescent, climactic, and senile. An introduction 

to the techniques and social agencies available in helping 

people meet their problems. -~ u -ru • j v 

^ ^ r 30 Hours, Third Year 

Dr. Diethelm and staff 

171- Principles of Psychiatric Nursing 

This course is organized to give students an understand- 
ing of the basic principles in the nursing care of personality 
disorders and the nursing procedures used in their treat- 
ment. Emphasis is placed also upon the relation of emotion- 
al disturbances to physical illness and of early development 
to future adult life. Lectures, demonstrations, and clinics. 
30 Hours, Third Year 

Miss Sprogell, Miss Corrigan, Miss Joinville, 
Miss Lewis, Miss Noble and staff 

172. a. Practice of Psychiatric Nursing 

The application of the principles of psychiatric nursing 
through supervised practice in and conferences on the care 
of adults both in the in-patient and out-patient depart- 
ments. Behavior studies and case studies. 
568 Hours, Third Year 

Miss Sprogell, Miss Corrigan, Miss Joinville, 
Miss Lewis, Miss Noble and staff 

172. b. Special Therapeutics in Psychiatric Nursing 

An opportunity is given the student for observation and 
practice in hydrotherapy, occupational and recreational 
therapies, with special emphasis on needs of the individual 
patient. Conferences and supervised practice. 

140 Hours, Third Year 

Miss Gunderson, Miss Brindle 

Psychology 

180. Elementary Psychology 

An introduction to the study of human behavior and the 
underlying principles of mental adjustments and habit for- 

[33] 



mation. An effort is made to apply this study to the stu- 
dent's own personality and give her a more scientific basis 
by which she can get a better understanding of the be- 
havior of herself, her co-workers, and her patients. Reci- 
tations and lectures. 

30 Hours, First Year 
Miss Kennedy 

181. Psychology of Deviate Behavior 

A study of the deviations in behavior of adults and 
children, due to organic and sociological factors, and of 
the nursing care necessary in assisting patients in making 
more adequate adjustments during illness. The principles 
of mental hygiene are emphasized. Lectures, recitations, 
and clinics. 

15 Hours, First Year 
Miss Kennedy 

Development of Behavior in Children (See Pediatrics) 

Surgical Nursing 

190. Surgery 

Surgical aspects of diseases are presented in these lectures 
and clinics. Factors determining the need for surgical 
interference are discussed and the major steps in the opera- 
tion outlined. Special emphasis is placed upon signs, 
symptoms, and observations which should be made both 
preceding and following operation. 

45 Hours, First Year 
Dr. Heuer and staff 

191. Principles of Surgical Nursing 

Through lectures and demonstrations students are taught 
the principles and methods of surgical asepsis and the nurs- 
ing of surgical patients. In the third year emphasis is 
placed upon managerial and teaching problems, and the 
newer methods of treatment are presented. 

15 Hours, First Year 
8 Hours, Third Year 
Miss Lyons, Miss Fedder, Miss Harmon, 
Miss Newton, Miss Sturtevant 

[34] 



192. Practice of Surgical Nursing 

Supervised practice and study of the application of nurs- 
ing principles to the care of patients on surgical pavilions 
of the hospital. Practice includes care of patients and 
managerial experience during the day, evening, and night. 
Demonstrations and conferences. 

886 Hours, First and Third Years 
Miss Lyons, Miss Fedder, Miss Harmon, 
Miss Newton, Miss Sturtevant, 
Miss Vernstrom and staff 

193- Operative Technique 

This course is designed to give the student a thorough 
understanding of surgical aseptic technique. It is planned 
to develop dexterity and intelligent response in assisting 
with operations and in meeting surgical emergencies. 
Experience is given in the general operating room and 
the gynecological operating room. 

15 Hours, lectures, demonstrations, and conferences 

359 Hours, practice, Second Year 

Miss Lyons, Mrs. West, Miss Jensen and staff 




STUDY IN A CONFERENCE ROOM 



CORNELL UNIVERSITY-NEW YORK 
HOSPITAL SCHOOL OF NURSING 

STAFF OF ADMINISTRATION 

Edmund Ezra Day President of the University 

Bessie A. R. Parker Director 

Harriet Frost Associate Director 

May Kennedy Associate Director 

ASSISTANTS IN ADMINISTRATION 

Flora J. Bergstrom Librarian 

Ella L. Bullen Secretary 

Alice Harriman Registrar 

EXECUTIVE FACULTY 

Bessie A. R. Parker, Chairman Alice M. Moffatt 

Harriet Frost Sarah E. Moore 

Verda F. Hickcox Olive M. Reid 

Joseph C. Hinsey Agnes Schubert 

May Kennedy Carolyne A. Sprogell 

Veronica Lyons Henricus J. Stander 



36 



ALUMNAE COMMITTEE OF 
THE SCHOOL OF NURSING 

Mary Beard, Chairman 
Minnie H. Jordan Annie W. Goodrich, Vice Chairman 

STANDING COMMITTEES OF THE FACULTY 
Committee on Curriculum 

Bessie A. R. Parker, Chairman Verda F. Hickcox 
David P. Barr May Kennedy 

OSKAR DlETHELM VERONICA LYONS 

Eugene F. DuBois Agnes Schubert 

Harriet Frost Thelma Stone 

Committee on Nursing Principles and Practice 

Thelma Stone, Chairman Kathleen Newton 

Sarah M. Ferguson Olive M. Reid 

Catherine P. Geuss Carol Sturtevant 

Margaret Joinville 

Committee on Admissions 

Eleanor M. Corrigan, Chairman 
Helen M. Daum Thelma Stone 

Margery T. Overholser Sarah E. Moore 

Eugene F. Bradford, Director of Admissions, 
Cornell University, member ex-officio 

Committees on Promotion 

first year students 

Thelma Stone, Chairman Mary T. McDermott 

Helen M. Daum Kathryn Rohrbaugh 

Elizabeth Harmon 

second year students 

Veronica Lyons, Chairman Sarah M. Ferguson 

Frances L. Boyle Henderika Rynbergen 

Hedwig Darbois Mary West 



The Director and Associate Directors are members ex-officio of all 
committees. 

[37] 



THIRD YEAR STUDENTS 

Carolyne A. Sprogell, Chairman 

Virginia Daniels Carol Sturtevant 

Olive M. Reid Alice M. Moffatt 

Library Committee 

May Kennedy, Chairman Elizabeth Harmon 

Flora J. Bergstrom Genevieve Noble 

Virginia Daniels Olive M. Reid 

Hedwig Darbois Henderika Rynbergen 

Harriet Frost Helen M. Schnetzer 

Committee on Records 
May Kennedy, Chairman Olive M. Reid 

Verda F. Hickcox Agnes Schubert 

Veronica Lyons Carolyne A. Sprogell 

Alice M. Moffatt 

Committee on Student and Staff Health 

Harriet Frost, Chairman Olive M. Reid 

Mary E. Klein Kathryn Rohrbaugh 

Eleanor Lewis Helen M. Schnetzer 

Veronica Lyons Marian Tyndall 

Committee on Scholarship Aid and Student Loan 

May Kennedy, Chairman Agnes Schubert 

Helen M. Daum 

Committee on Affiliating Students 

Agnes Schubert, Chairman Veronica Lyons 

Verda F. Hickcox 

Committee on graduate Courses 

Verda F. Hickcox, Chairman Agnes Schubert 
Veronica Lyons Carolyne A. Sprogell 

Olive M. Reid 

Committee on Student Extra-Curricular Activities 

Margery T. Overholser, Chairman 

Eleanor M. Corrigan Mary T. McDermott 

Catherine P. Geuss Hedwig Darbois 

[38] 






FACULTY 

Edmund Ezra Day, B.S., M.A., Ph.D., LL.D. 

President of the University 

Cornelius Betten, Ph.D., D.Sc. 

Dean of the University Faculty 

Professors 
Bessie A. R. Parker, B.S., R.N. 

Professor of Nursing, 

Director of the School of Nursing 

and Director of the Nursing Service 

Graduate Provincial Normal School, Fredericton, N. B., Canada, 1905; 
Diploma in Nursing, Rhode Island Hospital Training School for 
Nurses, Providence, 1918; B.S. Teachers College, Columbia University, 
1937; Teacher, Public Schools, 1905-1915; Assistant Superintendent of 
Nurses and Instructor, Nursing Practice, Rhode Island Hospital Train- 
ing School for Nurses, 1918-1920; Assistant Superintendent of Nurses 
and Instructor, Nursing Practice, Bridgeport General Hospital School 
of Nursing, 1920-1921; Assistant Superintendent of Nurses and Instruc- 
tor, Nursing Practice, Methodist Episcopal Hospital School of Nurs- 
ing, Brooklyn, 1921-1926; Superintendent of Nurses, ibid., 1926-1932; 
Administrative Assistant, Evening Nursing Service, The New York 
Hospital, 1932-1935; Assistant Director, The New York Hospital 
School of Nursing, 1936-1940; Head of Medical and Surgical Nursing 
Instruction and Services, The New York Hospital, 1936-1940; Director 
of the School of Nursing, The New York Hospital, 1940-42; Director 
of the Nursing Service, The New York Hospital, 1940-; Professor of 
Nursing and Director, Cornell University-New York Hospital School 
of Nursing, 1942-. 

Harriet Frost, R.N. 

Professor of Nursing, Associate 
Director of the School of Nursing 

Diploma in Nursing, St. John's Hospital, Yonkers, 1906; Course in Pub- 
lic Health Nursing, Teachers College, Columbia University, 1915-1916; 
Assistant Superintendent and Superintendent of Nurses, St. John's Hos- 
pital, 1908-1910; Superintendent, Mercer Hospital, Trenton, 1913- 
1915; Director, Department of Instruction, Visiting Nurse Society, 
Philadelphia, 1916-1932; Supervisor, Public Health Nursing Depart- 
ment, Pennsylvania School of Social and Health Work, 1919-1932; 

[39] 



Associate Director, The New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1932- 
42; Director, Public Health Nursing, ibid., 1932-42; Professor of Nurs- 
ing and Associate Director, Cornell University-New York Hospital 
School of Nursing, 1942-. 

May Kennedy, M.A., R.N. 

Professor of Nursing, Associate 
Director of the School of Nursing 

Diploma in Nursing, St. Joseph's Hospital, Chicago, 1907; B.S. Teach- 
ers College, Columbia University, 1917; M.A. University of Chicago, 
1932; Chief Nurse, Illinois State Hospitals, 1907-1918; General Staff 
Nurse and Chief Nurse, American Expeditionary Forces, France, 1918- 
1919; Superintendent of Nurses, Indianapolis City Hospital, 1919-1920; 
Director of Nursing and Director of Illinois State School of Psychiatric 
Nursing, Illinois Department of Public Welfare, 1920-1932; Lecturer, 
University of Chicago, Summer Quarters, 1928-1931; Director of Insti- 
tutes, 1922-; Lecturer, University of Wisconsin, one semester, 1931- 
1932; Lecturer, De Paul University, Summer Session, 1929; Associate 
Director, The New York Hospital School of Nursing 1932-42; Direc- 
tor, Pedagogy, ibid., 1932-42; Professor of Nursing and Associate 
Director, Cornell Universitv-New York Hospital School of Nursing, 
1942-. 

Associate Professors 

Verda F. Hickcox, B.S., R.N. 

Associate Professor of Nursing, 
Head of Obstetric and Gynecological 
Nursing Service 

Diploma in Nursing, Presbyterian Hospital School for Nurses, Chicago, 
1916; Certificate of Public Health, Chicago School of Civics and Philan- 
thropy, 1919; B.S. Teachers College, Columbia University, 1927; 
C.M.B., General Lying-in Hospital and School of Midwifery, London, 
England, 1928; Chief Nurse, Longfellow Mining and Accident Hospi- 
tal, Morenci, Arizona, 1916-1918; General Staff Nurse, U. S. Army 
Base Hospital No. 13, France, 1918-1919; Psychiatric Social Worker, 
Psychiatric Hospital, Dunning, Illinois, 1920; Community Nurse, 
American Red Cross, Morenci, Arizona, 1920-1922; Private Duty, 
1922-1924; General Staff Nurse, University of Wisconsin Hospital, 
1924-1925; Private Duty, 1925-1926; Supervisor, Visiting Nurse Asso- 
ciation, York, Pennsylvania, 1927-1928; Instructor and Assistant to 
Director, Brooklyn Maternity Center Association, 1928; Instructor of 
Midwifery and Supervisor of Obstetric and Gynecological Depart- 
ments, Siriraj Hospital, Bangkok, Siam, 1929-1931; Consultant Nurse, 
Maternity, Infancy and Child Hygiene, New York State Department of 
Health, 1931-1932; Assistant Director, The New York Hospital School 

[40] 



of Nursing, 1932-42; Head of Obstetric and Gynecological Nursing 
Service, The New York Hospital, 1932—; Associate Professor of Nurs- 
ing, Cornell University-New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1942-. 

Olive M. Reid, A.B., R.N. 

Associate Professor of Nursing, 
Head of Out-Patient Nursing Service 

A.B., Western College for Women, Oxford, Ohio, 1916; Diploma in 
Nursing, Army School of Nursing, Washington, D. C, 1921; member of 
Army Nurse Corps, 1921-1923; Assistant in Operating Room, Stanford 
University Hospitals, San Francisco, California, 1923-1925; Assistant 
Director of Nurses, Alaska Railroad Hospital, Anchorage, Alaska, 
1925-1927; Head Nurse, Max Epstein Clinic, University of Chicago 
Clinics, 1928-1930; Assistant Supervisor, ibid., 1930-1931; Supervisor, 
ibid., 1931-1934; Operating Room Supervisor, Stanford University 
Hospitals, San Francisco, California, 1934-1937; Director, Nursing 
Service, Out-Patient Department, Children's Memorial Hospital, 
Chicago, 1937-1939; Director of Out-Patient Department, Children's 
Hospital Society, Los Angeles, California, 1939-1940; Assistant Di- 
rector, The New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1940-42; Head of 
Out-Patient Nursing Service, The New York Hospital, 1940-; Asso- 
ciate Professor of Nursing, Cornell University-New York Hospital 
School of Nursing, 1942-. 

Agnes Schubert, M.S., R.N. 

Associate Professor of Nursing, 
Head of Pediatric Nursing Service 

B.S. Northwestern University, 1917; Diploma in Nursing, Western 
Reserve University School of Nursing, 1926; M.S. Teachers College, 
Columbia University, 1932; Evening Supervisor, Babies' and Children's 
Hospital, Western Reserve University, 1926-1927; Assistant Instructor 
and Supervisor, ibid., 1927-1928; Assistant Director, ibid., 1928-1930; 
Supervisor and Instructor, Bobs Roberts Hospital, The University of 
Chicago Clinics, 1930-1931; Assistant Director, The New York Hospi- 
tal School of Nursing, 1932-42; Head of Pediatric Nursing Service, The 
New York Hospital, 1932-; Associate Professor of Nursing, Cornell 
University-New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1942-. 

Carolyxe A. Sprogell, B.S., R.N. 

Associate Professor of Nursing, 
Director, Psychiatric Nursing Service 

Diploma in Nursing, St. Lukes Hospital School of Nursing, New York, 
1924; Post-graduate Course, Psychiatry, Westchester Division, The 

[41] 



New York Hospital, 1930; B.S. Teachers College, Columbia University, 
1936; Head Nurse, Southampton Hospital, 1924; Night Supervisor, 
ibid., 1925; Private Duty, 1926; Assistant Superintendent and Instruc- 
tor, Practical Nursing, Southampton Hospital, 1927-1928; Supervisor, 
St. Lukes Hospital, New York, 1929; Assistant Director of Nurses, 
Westchester Division, The New York Hospital, 1930-1931; Acting 
Director of Nurses, ibid., 1931-1932; Assistant Director, The New York 
Hospital School of Nursing, 1932-42; Director, Psychiatric Nursing, 
Payne Whitney Clinic, The New York Hospital, 1932-; Associate 
Professor of Nursing, Cornell University-New York Hospital School 
of Nursing, 1942-. 



Assistant Professors 

Eleanor M. Corrigan, B.S., R.N. 

Assistant Professor of Nursing, 
Administrative Assistant, 
Psychiatric Nursing Service 

Diploma in Nursing, St. Lukes Hospital School of Nursing, New York, 
1927; Post-graduate Course in Psychiatry, Westchester Division, The 
New York Hospital, 1932; B.S. Teachers College, Columbia Univer- 
sity, 1940; Operating Room Supervisor, St. Lukes Hospital, New York, 
1929-1932; Head Nurse, Payne Whitney Clinic, The New York Hospi- 
tal, 1932-1935; Instructor, Psychiatric Nursing, The New York Hos- 
pital School of Nursing, 1935-1942; Supervisor, Psychiatric Nursing 
Service, Payne Whitney Clinic, The New York Hospital, 1935-1937; 
Administrative Assistant, ibid., 1937-; Assistant Professor of Nursing, 
Cornell University-New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1942-. 



Helen M. Daum, M.A., R.N. 

Assistant Professor of Nursing, 
Supervisor, Medical Nursing Service 

Diploma in Nursing, The New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1918: 
M.A. Teachers College, Columbia University, 1941; Private Duty 
Nursing, 1918-1929; School Nurse, Ottawa, Illinois, 1929-1930; Head 
Nurse, Medical Nursing Service, The New York Hospital, 1932-1934; 
Instructor, Medical Nursing, The New York Hospital School of Nurs- 
ing, 1934-1942; Assistant Supervisor, Medical Nursing Service, The 
New York Hospital, 1934-1935; Supervisor, Medical Nursing Service, 
ibid., 1935—; Assistant Professor of Nursing, Cornell University-New 
York Hospital School of Nursing, 1942-. 

[42] 



Catherine P. Geuss, M.A., R.N. 

Assistant Professor of Nursing, 
Supervisor, Obstetric and Gyneco- 
logical Nursing Service 

Diploma in Teaching, Northeast Missouri Teachers College, 1924; 
Diploma in Nursing, Michael Reese Hospital School of Nursing, 1928; 
Diploma, Obstetrics and Gynecology, Woman's Hospital, New York, 
1929; Student, University of Chicago, 1930; B.S. and Diploma in 
Supervision, Teachers College, Columbia University, 1932; M.A., 
ibid., 1942; Teacher, 1919-1924; Head Nurse and Instructor, Obstetric 
Nursing, Michael Reese Hospital, 1929-1930; Supervisor, Surgical 
Wards, ibid., 1930-1931; Instructor, Obstetric and Gynecological 
Nursing, The New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1932-42; Assist- 
ant Supervisor, Obstetric and Gynecological Nursing Service, The 
New York Hospital, 1932-1935; Supervisor, ibid., 1935-; Assistant 
Professor of Nursing, Cornell University-New York Hospital School 
of Nursing, 1942-. 

Mary Elizabeth Klein, B.S., R.N. 

Assistant Professor of Nursing, 
Supervisor, Obstetric and Gyneco- 
logical Nursing Service 

Diploma in Nursing, Hahnemann Hospital School of Nursing, 1916; 
B.S. Teachers College, Columbia University, 1936; Supervisor, Private 
Hospital, Guayaquil, Ecuador, 1917-1918; Private Duty, 1918-1921; 
Supervisor, Private Floors, Hahnemann Hospital, 1921-1925; Super- 
visor, Operating Rooms, ibid., 1925-1928; Head Nurse, Maternity 
Hospital, Western Reserve University, 1929-1930; Supervisor and As- 
sistant Instructor, ibid., 1930-1932; Instructor, Obstetric and Gyneco- 
logical Nursing, The New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1932-42; 
Supervisor, Obstetric and Gynecological Nursing Service, The New 
York Hospital, 1932—; Assistant Professor of Nursing, Cornell Uni- 
versity-New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1942-. 

Veronica Lyons, B.S., R.N. 

Assistant Professor of Nursing, 
Head of Medical and Surgical Nurs- 
ing Service 

Cornell University, 1921-1922; Diploma in Nursing, Johns Hopkins 
Hospital School for Nurses, 1927; B.S. Teachers College, Columbia 
University, 1936; Head Nurse, Gynecological Ward, Johns Hopkins 
Hospital, 1927-1928; Head Nurse, Surgical and Gynecological Ward, 
Binghamton City Hospital, 1928-1929; Suture Nurse, Operating Room, 

[43] 



Moore-Overton Hospital, Binghamton, 1929; Office Assistant, Eye, 
Ear, Nose and Throat Surgeon, 1929-1931; Instructor, Nursing Prin- 
ciples and Practice, Montefiore Hospital School of Nursing, 1931-1932; 
Head Nurse, Woman's Clinic, The New York Hospital, 1932-1935; 
Assistant to Director of Nurses, New Rochelle Hospital, 1936-1937; 
Instructor, Operative Technique and Practice, The New York Hospital 
School of Nursing, 1937-1942; Supervisor, General Operating Rooms, 
The New York Hospital, 1937-1942; Head of Medical and Surgical 
Nursing Service, ibid., 1942-; Assistant Professor of Nursing, Cornell 
University-New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1942-. 



Mary T. McDermott, M.A. 

Assistant Professor of Physical Education, 
Director, Nurses' Residence 

Diploma, Bouve Boston School of Physical Education, 1916; Special 
Courses, Harvard University, 1917-1919, 1931; People's College, Den- 
mark, 1926; B.S., New York University, 1930; M.A. ibid., 1932; Super- 
visor, Physical Education, Third Supervisory District, Greene County, 
N. Y., 1916-1918; Supervisor, Physical Education, Public Schools, 
Fitchburg, Massachusetts, 1918-1919; Supervisor of Playground, Con- 
cord, Massachusetts, 1919; Supervisor, Physical Education, Public 
Schools, Revere, Massachusetts, 1919-1921; Supervisor of Playground, 
Brookline, Massachusetts, 1921; Supervisor, Physical Education, 
Public Schools, Stockbridge, Massachusetts, 1921-1923; Assistant 
Director of Physical Education, State Teachers College, North Adams, 
Massachusetts, 1922-1923; Assistant Supervisor of Physical Education, 
Public Schools, Passaic, New Jersey, 1923-1924; Director of Health and 
Physical Education, State Teachers College, Fitchburg, Massachu- 
setts, 1924-1929; Assistant in the Department of Physical Education, 
New York University, 1931; Director, Nurses' Residence and Instruc- 
tor of Physical Education, The New York Hospital School of Nursing, 
1932-1942; Assistant Professor of Physical Education and Director, 
Nurses' Residence, Cornell University-New York Hospital School of 
Nursing, 1942-. 

Alice Maud Moffatt, R.N. 

Assistant Professor of Nursing, 

Head of Private Patients Nursing Service 

Bishop Bethune College, Oshawa, Canada, 1904-1906; Diploma in 
Nursing, The New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1912; Private 
Duty, ibid., 1912-1915; Head Nurse, Johnstone-Reckitt Hopital 
Militaire V.R. 76, Ris-Orangis, France, 1915-1916; Supervisor, Private 
Patients' Building, The New York Hospital, 1917-1932; Head of 
Private Patients Nursing Service, ibid., 1932-; Assistant Professor of 

[44] 



Nursing, Cornell University-New York Hospital School of Nursing, 
1942-. 

Sarah E. Moore, R.N. 

Assistant Professor of Nursing, 
Administrative Assistant, Day 
Nursing Service 

Diploma in Nursing, The New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1913; 
Part-time student, Teachers College, Columbia University and New 
York University, 1914, 1926, 1927, 1928; Teacher, Public Schools, 
1903-1908; Head Nurse, The New York Hospital, 1913-1918; Instruc- 
tor, Practical Nursing, The New York Hospital School of Nursing, 
1918-1922; Assistant Directress of Nurses, ibid., 1923-1932; Acting 
Directress of Nurses, ibid., 1932; Administrative Assistant, Day Nursing 
Service, The New York Hospital, 1932-; Assistant Professor of Nurs- 
ing, Cornell University-New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1942-. 

Margery Treiber Overholser, B.S., R.N. 

Assistant Professor of Nursing, 
Supervisor, Pediatric Out-Patient 
Nursing Service 

Diploma in Nursing, Wesley Memorial Hospital School of Nursing, 
1922; B.S. Teachers College, Columbia University, 1927; Private Duty 
and General Staff Nursing, 1922-1926; Supervisor, Pediatric Depart- 
ment, Bellevue Hospital, 1927-1928; Charge, Pediatric Department, 
ibid., 1928-1929; Assistant Director of Nurses, Reading General Hos- 
pital, 1929-1930; Teaching Supervisor, ibid., 1930-1932; Supervisor 
of Nurseries, New York Hospital, 1932-1936; Assistant Director of 
Nurses and Supervisor of Clinical Instruction, Hahnemann Hospital, 
1938-1939; Instructor, Pediatric Nursing, The New York Hospital 
School of Nursing, 1939-42; Supervisor, Pediatric Out-Patient Nursing 
Service, New York Hospital, 1939—; Assistant Professor of Nursing, 
Cornell University-New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1942-. 

Henderika J. Ryxbergen, M.S. 

Assistant Professor of Sciences 

B.S. Simmons College, 1922; M.S. Cornell University Medical College, 
1938; Nutrition Worker, Neighborhood Kitchen, Boston, 1922-1924; 
Food Clinic Dietitian, Washington University Dispensary, Barnes and 
Allied Hospitals, St. Louis, 1924-1926; Head Dietitian, Sea View Hos- 
pital, New York, 1927; Ward Dietitian, Presbvterian Hospital, New 
York, 1927-1928; Food Clinic Dietitian, Vanderbilt Clinic, ibid., 1928- 
1929; Dietitian, American University Hospital, Beirut, Syria, 1929- 

[45] 



1934; Instructor in Nutrition, The New York Hospital School of Nurs- 
ing, 1934-1938; Instructor of Chemistry, Physiology and Nutrition, 
ibid., 1938-42; Assistant Professor of Sciences, Cornell University- 
New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1942-. 

Instructors 

Sylvia Abbott, B.S., R.N. 

Instructor in Nursing, 

Supervisor, Out-Patient Nursing Service 

Diploma, Washington State Normal School, 1927; Diploma in Nursing, 
Massachusetts General Hospital School of Nursing, 1931; Certificate in 
Public Health Nursing, Simmons College, 1938; B.S. New York Uni- 
versity, 1941; Charge Nurse, Mary Imogene Bassett Hospital, Coopers- 
town, New York, 1931-1932; Staff Nurse, Community Health Associa- 
tion, Boston, 1932-1937; Instructor, Medical and Surgical Out-Patient 
Nursing, The New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1938-42; Super- 
visor, Out-Patient Nursing Service, The New York Hospital, 1938-; 
Instructor in Nursing, Cornell University-New York Hospital School 
of Nursing, 1942-. 

Frances Lucretia Boyle, R.N. 

Instructor in Nursing, 
Supervisor, Obstetric Out-Patient 

Nursing Service 

Diploma in Nursing, Moses Taylor Hospital, Scranton, Pa., 1924; 
Part-time Student, Teachers College, Columbia University, 1939-; 
Supervisor, Delivery Room, Manhattan Maternity and Dispensary, 
1925-1927; Staff Nurse, Bowling Green Neighborhood Assn., 1927- 
1931; Assistant Clinic Supervisor, East Harlem Nursing and Health 
Service, 1931-1941; Instructor, Obstetric Nursing, The New York 
Hospital School of Nursing, 1941-42; Supervisor, Obstetric Out- 
Patient Nursing Service, The New York Hospital, 1941-; Instructor in 
Nursing, Cornell Universitv-New York Hospital School of Nursing, 
1942-. 

Virginia Daniels, B.S., R.N. 

Instructor in Nursing, 

Supervisor, Medical Nursing Service 

Beloit College, 1923-1924; Frances Shimer Junior College, 1925-1926; 
Diploma in Nursing, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, Chi- 
cago, 1930; B.S. Teachers College, Columbia University, 1937; General 
Staff Nurse, Presbyterian Hospital, Chicago, 1930-1931; Private Duty 
and Staff Nurse, Chicago Visiting Nurse Association, 1931-1932; 

[46] 



General Staff Nurse, Medical and Surgical Nursing Service, The New 
York Hospital, 1932-1934; Head Nurse, ibid., 1934-1936; Instructor, 
Medical and Surgical Nursing, The New York Hospital School of Nurs- 
ing, 1936-; Evening Supervisor, Medical and Surgical Nursing Service, 
The New York Hospital, 1936-1937; Instructor, Medical Nursing, The 
New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1937-42; Supervisor, Medical 
Nursing Service, The New York Hospital, 1937; Instructor in Nursing, 
Cornell University-New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1942-. 

Elizabeth Harmon, B.A., R.N. 

Instructor in Nursing, 

Supervisor, Surgical Nursing Service 

B.A. College of Wooster, 1928; Diploma in Nursing, Presbyterian Hos- 
pital School of Nursing, Chicago, 1931; General Staff Nurse, Presby- 
terian Hospital, Chicago, 1931-1932; General Staff Nurse, The New 
York Hospital, 1932-1934; Head Nurse, ibid., 1934-1937; Instructor, 
Medical and Surgical Nursing, The New York Hospital School of 
Nursing, 1937; Night Supervisor, Medical and Surgical Nursing Serv- 
ice, The New York Hospital, 1937-1938; Instructor, Surgical Nursing, 
The New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1938-42; Supervisor, 
Surgical Nursing Service, The New York Hospital, 1938—; Instructor 
in Nursing, Cornell Universitv-New York Hospital School of Nursing, 
1942-. 

Margaret Joinville, B.S., R.N. 

Instructor in Nursing, 

Supervisor, Psychiatric Nursing Service 

Diploma in Nursing, The Army School of Nursing, 1929; Part-time 
Student, Hunter College and Teachers College, Columbia University, 
1933-1941; Private Duty, 1929-1931; Assistant Head Nurse, West- 
chester Division, The New York Hospital, 1931-1932; Head Nurse, 
Payne Whitney Clinic, The New York Hospital, 1932-1936; Instructor, 
Psychiatric Nursing, The New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1936- 
1942; Supervisor, Psychiatric Nursing Service, Payne Whitney Clinic, 
The New York Hospital, 1936-; Instructor in Nursing, Cornell Uni- 
versity-New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1942-. 

Eleanor Lewis, B.A., B.N., R.N. 

Instructor in Nursing, 

Supervisor, Psychiatric Out-Patient 

Nursing Service 

B.A. Radcliffe College, 1925; B.N. Yale University School of Nursing, 
1928; Nurse in Charge, Urological Clinic, New Haven Hospital, 1928- 

[47] 



1929; Psychiatric Nursing, Four Winds Sanatorium, Katonah, New 
York, 1929-1932; Assistant Head Nurse, Children's Service, Payne 
Whitney Clinic, The New York Hospital, 1932-1933; Staff Nurse, 
ibid., 1933-1934; Staff Nurse, Brooklyn Visiting Nurse Association, 
1934-1935; Instructor, Psychiatric Nursing, The New York Hospital 
School of Nursing, 1935-42; Supervisor, Psychiatric Out-Patient Nurs- 
ing Service, Payne Whitney Clinic, The New York Hospital, 1935—; 
Instructor in Nursing, Cornell University-New York Hospital School 
of Nursing, 1942-. 

Kathleen Newton, B.S., R.N. 

Instructor in Nursing, 

Supervisor, Surgical Nursing Service 

Diploma in Nursing, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, 
1936; B.S. in Nursing Education, ibid., 1936; B.S. in General Sciences, 
ibid., 1934; Staff Nurse, University General Hospital, Seattle, Wash- 
ington, 1937-1938; Clinical Instructor and Surgical and Medical Super- 
visor, The Children's Hospital, Denver, Colorado, 1938-1941; Super- 
visor, Surgical Nursing Service, The New York Hospital, 1942-; 
Instructor in Nursing, Cornell University-New York Hospital School of 
Nursing, 1942-. 

Genevieve Noble, M.A., R.N. 

Instructor in Nursing, 

Supervisor, Psychiatric Nursing Service 

Goucher College, B.A., 1932; Teachers College, Columbia University, 
M.A., 1927; Diploma in Nursing, Presbyterian Hospital School of 
Nursing, New York, 1938; Graduate Course, Psychiatry, Payne Whit- 
ney Clinic, The New York Hospital, 1939; General Staff Nurse, ibid., 
1939; Assistant Head Nurse, ibid., 1940; Head Nurse, ibid., 1941; In- 
structor, Psychiatric Nursing, The New York Hospital School of 
Nursing, 1942; Supervisor, Psychiatry Nursing Service, Payne Whitney 
Clinic, The New York Hospital, 1942-; Instructor in Nursing, Cornell 
University-New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1942-. 

Thelma L. Stone, B.S., R.N. 

Instructor in Nursing Arts 

Diploma in Nursing, The New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1936; 
B.S., Simmons College, 1941; Assistant Head Nurse, The New York 
Hospital, 1937; Head Nurse, Syracuse Memorial Hospital, 1938-1940; 
Assistant Instructor, Nursing Arts, ibid., 1941-1942; Instructor in 
Nursing Arts, Cornell University-New York Hospital School of Nurs- 
ing, 1942-. 

[48] 



Assistants 

Hedwig Darbois, R.N. 

Assistant in Nursing, 
Supervisor, Obstetric and Gyne- 
cological Nursing Service 

Diploma, Packer Collegiate Institute, 1931; Diploma in Nursing, The 
New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1937; Part-time Student, Teach- 
ers College, Columbia University, 1937-1939; Part-time Student, New 
York University, 1941-; Staff Nurse, East Harlem Nursing and Health 
Service, 1937-1939; Staff Nurse, Pediatric Out-Patient Nursing Service, 
The New York Hospital, 1940-1941;. Instructor, New Born Care, The 
New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1941-42; Supervisor, Obstetric 
and Gynecological Nursing Service, The New York Hospital, 1942-; 
Assistant in Nursing, Cornell University-New York Hospital School of 
Nursing, 1942-. 



Helma Fedder, B.S., R.N. 

Assistant in Nursing, 

Supervisor, Surgical Nursing Service 

Diploma in Nursing, Washington University School of Nursing, St. 
Louis, Missouri, 1933; B.S., University of Chicago, 1942; General 
Staff Nurse, Barnes Hospital, St. Louis, Missouri, 1933-1935; Assistant 
Head Nurse, ibid., 1935-1936; Head Nurse, ibid., 1936-1938; General 
Staff Nurse, Billings Hospital, Chicago, 1938-1942; Supervisor, Surgi- 
cal Nursing, The New York Hospital, 1942-; Assistant in Nursing, 
Cornell University-New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1942-. 



Inez Gnau, R.N. 

Assistant in Nursing, 

Supervisor, Psychiatric Nursing Service 

Diploma in Nursing, Jefferson Hospital School of Nursing, Phila- 
delphia, Pennsylvania, 1935; Postgraduate course in Psychiatry, Penn- 
sylvania Hospital, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 1936; Part-time Stu- 
dent, Teachers College, Columbia University, 1937; Hunter College, 
1937-1939; Private dutv, 1936; Staff Nurse, Pavne Whitnev Clinic, 
The New York Hospital, 1936; Head Nurse, ibid., 1937-1942; Night 
Supervisor, Psychiatric Nursing Service, Payne Whitney Clinic, The 
New York Hospital, 1942-; Assistant in Nursing, Cornell University- 
New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1942-. 

[49] 



Lillian Mead Henderson, R.N. 

Assistant in Nursing, 
Supervisor, Medical and 
Surgical Nursing Service 

Diploma in Nursing, Syracuse University School of Nursing, 1930; 
Part-time Student, Syracuse University, 1935, State College, Albany, 
New York, 1936-1937; University of Rochester, 1938-1940; General 
Staff Nurse, Albany Hospital, Albany, New York, 1930-1934; Assist- 
ant Head Nurse, ibid., 1934-1937; General Nursing Supervisor, Roches- 
ter General Hospital, Rochester, New York, 1937-1941; Assistant in 
Nursing Office and Nursing Supervisor, Wyckoff Heights Hospital, 
Brooklyn, New York, 1941-42; Supervisor, Medical and Surgical 
Nursing Service, The New York Hospital, 1942-; Assistant in Nursing, 
Cornell University-New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1942-. 



Margaret Kelly, R.N. 

Assistant in Nursing, 

Supervisor, Pediatric Nursing Service 

Diploma in Nursing, The Troy Hospital, Troy, New York, 1921; 
General Staff Nurse, The Brady Maternity Hospital, Albany, New 
York, 1921-1922; General Staff Nurse, The New York Infirmary for 
Women, 1922; General Staff Nurse, The Russell Sage Institute of 
Pathology, 1922-1923; Private Duty Nurse, 1923-1924; Head Nurse, 
Pediatric Research, The New York Nursery and Childs Hospital, 1925- 
1932; Head Nurse, Pediatric Research, The New York Hospital, 1932- 
1942; Night Supervisor, Pediatric Nursing Service, The New York 
Hospital, 1942-; Assistant in Nursing, Cornell University-New York 
Hospital School of Nursing, 1942-. 



Enid Kircaldie, R.N. 

Assistant in Nursing, 

Supervisor, Psychiatric Nursing Service 

Diploma in Nursing, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, New 
York, New York, 1931; Postgraduate course in Psychiatry, West- 
chester Division, The New York Hospital, 1931; Staff Nurse, Payne 
Whitney Clinic, The New York Hospital, 1932-1923; Assistant Head 
Nurse, ibid., 1933-1936; Head Nurse, ibid., 1936-1939; Assistant Night 
Supervisor, Psychiatric Nursing Service, Payne Whitney Clinic, The 
New York Hospital, 1942-; Assistant in Nursing, Cornell University- 
New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1942-. 

[50] 



Marie A. Lalime, R.N. 

Assistant in Nursing, 
Supervisor, Medical and Surgical 
Nursing Service 

Diploma in Nursing, Misericordia Hospital School of Nursing, 1926; 
Part-time Student, Teachers College, Fordham University, 1933-1934; 
Head Nurse, Male Surgery, Misericordia Hospital, 1926-1927; Private 
Duty, 1927-1928; Supervisor in Obstetrics, Misericordia Hospital, 
1928-1935; Private Duty, 1935-1936; General Staff Nurse, The New 
York Hospital, 1936-1937; Evening Head Nurse, Emergency Pavilion, 
ibid., 1937-1938; Instructor, Medical and Surgical Nursing, The New 
York Hospital School of Nursing, 1938-1942; Evening Supervisor, 
Medical and Surgical Service, The New York Hospital, 1938-; Assist- 
ant in Nursing, Cornell University-New York Hospital School of 
Nursing, 1942-. 

Mildred Leaning, B.S. 

Assistant in Physical Education 

B.S., Simmons College, Boston, Massachusetts, 1942; Assistant in 
Physical Education, Cornell University-New York Hospital School of 
Nursing, 1942-. 

Jessie MacIntosh, R.N. 

Assistant in Nursing, 

Supervisor, Pediatric Nursing Service 

Diploma in Nursing, The New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1938; 
Part-time Student, New York University, 1935 and 1939-; Assistant 
Head Nurse, Private Patients' Nursing Service, The New York Hospi- 
tal, 1938-1940; Assistant Head Nurse, Medical and Surgical Service, 
ibid., 1940-1941; Evening Supervisor, Pediatric Nursing Service, ibid., 
1941-; Assistant in Nursing, Cornell University-New York Hospital 
School of Nursing, 1942-. 

Kathryn Rohrbaugh, R.N. 

Assistant in Nursing, 
Supervisor, Nurses' Infirmary 

Diploma in Nursing, Jefferson Medical College Hospital, Philadelphia, 
Pennsylvania, 1934; Part-time Student, Hunter College, 1940-; General 
Staff Nurse, Yonkers General Hospital, 1935-1936; General Staff Nurse, 
The New York Hospital, 1936-1941; Supervisor, Nurses' Infirmary, 
ibid., 1941-; Assistant in Nursing, Cornell University-New York 
Hospital School of Nursing, 1942-. 

[51] 



Frieda Schmidt, R.N. 

Assistant in Nursing, 
Supervisor, Obstetric and Gynecologi- 
cal Nursing Service 

Diploma in Nursing, Massachusetts Women's Hospital School of 
Nursing, Boston, 1938; Private Duty and General Staff, Massachusetts 
Women's Hospital, 1938; Post-Graduate Course in Obstetric and 
Gynecological Nursing, The New York Hospital, 1938-1939; General 
Staff Nurse, Women's Clinic, The New York Hospital, 1939; Assistant 
Head Nurse, ibid., 1939-1942; Night Supervisor, Obstetric and Gyne- 
cological Nursing, ibid., 1942-; Assistant in Nursing, Cornell Univer- 
sity-New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1942-. 

Carol J. Sturtevant, R.N. 

Assistant in Nursing, 

Supervisor, Surgical Nursing Service 

Diploma in Nursing, St. Agnes School of Nursing, Fond du Lac, Wis- 
consin, 1934; Part-time Student, Northwestern University, 1935-1937; 
Part-time Student, Hunter College, 1938—; Private Duty Nursing, 1934- 
1935; General Staff Nurse, Passavant Memorial Hospital, Chicago, 
1935-1936; Head Nurse, ibid., 1936-1938; General Staff Nurse, Medical 
and Surgical Nursing Service, The New York Hospital, 1938; Assistant 
Head Nurse, ibid., 1938-1940; Head Nurse, ibid., 1940; Instructor, 
Surgical Nursing, The New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1940-42; 
Supervisor, Surgical Nursing Service, The New York Hospital, 1940-; 
Assistant in Nursing, Cornell University-New York Hospital School of 
Nursing, 1942-. 

Dorothy Vernstrom, B.S., R.N. 

Assistant in Nursing, 
Supervisor, Medical and Surgical 
Nursing Service 

Women's College, Brown University, 1925-26; Diploma in Nursing, 
Truesdale Hospital School of Nursing, 1930; B.S. Teachers College, 
Columbia University, 1941; Part time at Teachers College, Columbia 
University, 1941-; Assistant Instructor, Nursing Arts, Truesdale Hos- 
pital School of Nursing, 1930-31; Staff Nurse, Providence District 
Nurse Service, 1931-1932; Head Nurse, Medical Service, The New 
York Hospital, 1932-1935; Science Instructor, Memorial Hospital 
School of Nursing, Pawtucket, 1936-1938; Assistant Superintendent of 
Nurses, Truesdale Hospital, 1938-1939; Instructor, Medical and Surgi- 
cal Nursing, The New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1939-42; 
Night Supervisor, Medical and Surgical Nursing Service, The New 

[52] 



York Hospital, 1939 ; Assistant in Nursing, Cornell University-New 
York Hospital School of Nursing, 1942 . 

Jeanette Walters, R.N. 

Assistant in Nursing, 
Supervisor, Obstetric and Gyneco- 
logical Nursing Service 

Diploma in Nursing, Temple University Hospital School of Nursing, 
1923; Student, Teachers College, Columbia University, Summer 1924, 
Part-time Student, ibid., 1933, 1934, 1935; Part-time Student, New 
York University, 1937-1941; Post-Graduate Course, Obstetrics, Wo- 
man's Hospital, New York, 1932; Supervisor, Medical and Surgical 
Ward, Temple University Hospital, 1924-1925; Supervisor, Babies' 
Hospital, Philadelphia, 1926-1928; Assistant Superintendent, Colum- 
bia Hospital, 1928-1929; Supervisor, Obstetrical Department, Temple 
University Hospital, 1930; Instructor, Obstetric and Gynecological 
Nursing, The New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1932-42; Evening 
Supervisor, Obstetric and Gynecological Nursing Service, The New 
York Hospital, 1932-; Assistant in Nursing, Cornell University-New 
York Hospital School of Nursing, 1942-. 

Mary Kyer West, R.N. 

Assistant in Nursing, 

Supervisor, General Operating Rooms 

Diploma in Nursing, Samaritan Hospital School of Nursing, Troy, New 
York, 1932; General Staff Nurse, Samaritan Hospital, 1932-1933; Gen- 
eral Staff Nurse and Head Nurse, Operating Rooms, The New York 
Hospital, 1933-1937; Instructor, Operative Technique and Practice, 
The New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1937-42; Assistant Super- 
visor, General Operating Rooms, The New York Hospital, 1937-1941; 
Supervisor, General Operating Rooms, ibid., 1941-; Assistant in Nurs- 
ing, Cornell University-New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1942-. 



[53] 



MEMBERS OF THE FACULTY OF CORNELL 

UNIVERSITY MEDICAL COLLEGE WHO 

ARE ALSO MEMBERS OF THE 

FACULTY OF THE SCHOOL 

OF NURSING 

Joseph C. Hinsey, Ph.D Dean 

Professor of Anatomy 

David P. Barr, M.D Professor of Medicine 

McKeen Cattell, M.D Associate Professor of Pharmacology 

Oskar Diethelm, M.D Professor of Psychiatry 

Eugene F. DuBois, M.D Professor of Physiology 

Vincent Du Vigneaud, Ph.D Professor of Biochemistry 

George J. Heuer, M.D Professor of Surgery 

Samuel Z. Levine, M.D Professor of Pediatrics 

Wilson G. Smillie, M.D. 

Professor of Public Health and Preventive Medicine 
HenricusJ. Stander, M.D. . Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology 

LECTURERS 

Joseph P. Chandler, Ph.D Chemistry 

Assistant Professor of Biochemistry 

Edwin J. Doty, M.D Personality Study 

Warner S. Hammond, Ph.D Anatomy 

Instructor in Anatomy, Cornell Medical College 

W. R. Redden, M.D Emergency Nursing 

Ralph G. Stillman, M.D Microbiology 

Assistant Professor of Medicine (Clinical Pathology), 

Cornell Medical College 

Elizabeth L. Watson, M.A Microbiology 

Mary T. Whitley, Ph.D Child Psychology 

Professor of Psychology, Columbia University 
Chester L. Yntema, Ph.D Anatomy 

Assistant Professor of Anatomy, Cornell Medical College 
Camilla Gaute Massage 

HEALTH SERVICE 

Marian Tyndall, M.D., Edwin Doty, M.D., 

Physician in Chief Consulting Psychiatrist 

[54] 



MEMBERS OF OTHER DEPARTMENTS AND 

ORGANIZATIONS PARTICIPATING IN 

THE NURSING PROGRAM 

NUTRITION DEPARTMENT 

Margaret Gillam, M. A., Director Mrs. Lee Meyer, B.S. 

Barbara Correll, B.S. Mary Jane Murray, M.S. 

Mary Dodds, B.S. Susan N. Paige, B.S. 

Marie Krause, M.S. Beulah Thomas, B.S. 

Pauline Lewis, B.S. Ruth Warye, B.S. 

OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY DEPARTMENT, 
PAYNE WHITNEY CLINIC 

Pauline Gunderson, Director 

PHYSICAL THERAPY DEPARTMENT, 
PAYNE WHITNEY CLINIC 

Grace Brindle, Director 

SOCIAL SERVICE DEPARTMENTS 

Theodate H. Soule, M.A., Director, Main Hospital 
Mrs. Virginia T. Kinzel, Director, Woman's Clinic 
Mrs. Melly Simon, Director, Payne Whitney Clinic 

HENRY STREET VISITING NURSE SERVICE 
Katharine Faville, M.A., R.N., Director 

THE SOCIETY OF THE NEW YORK HOSPITAL 

William Harding Jackson President, Board of Governors 

Augustine J. Smith Secretary, Board of Governors 

Murray Sargent Administrator-in-Chief 



NURSING SERVICE 

STAFF OF ADMINISTRATION 

Bessie A. R. Parker Director of Nursing Service 

Charlotte S. Argabrite Night Administrative Assistant 

Cora E. Kay Evening Administrative Assistant 

Sarah E. Moore Day Administrative Assistant 

See Faculty for Heads of Clinical Nursing Services 

ASSISTANTS IN ADMINISTRATION 
Helen Holdenecker, Secretary Jean Ripley, Secretary 

[55] 



NURSING SERVICE COMMITTEE 



Bessie A. R. Parker, Chairman 
Charlotte S. Argabrite 
Verda F. Hickcox 
Cora E. Kay 
May Kennedy 
Veronica Lyons 



Alice M. Moffatt 
Sarah E. Moore 
Olive M. Reid 
Agnes Schubert 
Carolyne A. Sprogell 
Thelma Stone 



SUPERVISORS 

Madeleine O'Brien Myrna Wight 

Lucy J. MacDonald Ruth Woodfall 

Other Supervisors listed under Faculty 

HEAD NURSES 

Medical and Surgical Services 



Margaret Bissell 
Ruth Brockman 
Alice Bullivant 
Virginia Campbell 
Elizabeth Curtin 
Barbara Derr 
Elizabeth Fairclough 
Antoinette Fedorowicz 
Elizabeth Flaherty 
Cornelia Hedman 
Rita Hickey 
Rhoda Hines 



Evelyn Clark 
Alcida Coulter 
Katherine Drucklieb 
Elsie Fiege 
Elizabeth Geiger 

WlLLETTA HAYNES 

Vivian Hyer 
Lucille Lambert 



Dorothy Hoover 
Matilda McCarron 
(Personnel Clinic) 
Edith Nielsen 
Charlotte Rosenshein 
Ella Rowe 
Anita Scheel 
Stella Smariga 
Jessie Taplin 
Martha Thack 
Eunice Volpe 
Barbara Walsh 
Katherine Zorn 

Ota-Patient Service 

Evelyn Liddle 
Pauline Murphy 
Elsa Nussbaumer 
Celia Pehr 
M. Eva Poor 
Margaret Rouchleau 
Elizabeth Talbot 
Rebecca Talbott 



Payne Whitney Psychiatric Clinic 



Grace Lundgren 

Annamay Bovven 

Jessie Weaver 

Mary Goforth Whitaker 

Mary Kutz 

Gertrude Goodman 



Arlene Wilson 
William Roy 
Beatrice McKee 
Doris Jacobson 
Stella Copley 
Faye Wise 



56 



Ola Macpherson 



Alice Bahr 
Alma Blankin 
Grace Coates 
Lydia Hansen 



Selma Buchdahl 
Florence Campbell 
Henrietta Eppink 
Dorothy Fischer 
Eunice Greenwood 
Virginia Henry 
Eda Hoewischer 



Pediatric Service 

Celia M. Stallings 

Private and Semi-Private Services 

Katherine Matheson 
Helen Miller 
Ann Nielsen 
Jeanette Stone 

Woman s Clinic 

Mildred Jensen- 
Mary Little 
Veronica Matus 

Bettina Roden 
Rose \ alpreda 
Louise Woermbke 
Kathleen Young 



[57 





| 






\\\ 


p^ft i 



\ 






ON THE WAY TO HOSPITAL 



CORNELL UNIVERSITY OFFICIAL PUBLICATION 
VOLUME 35 : OCTOBER 1, 1943 : NUMBER 6 



Announcement of 
Cornell University-New York Hospital 

School of Nursing 

for 1943-44 




525 EAST 68th STREET, NEW YORK 21, N. Y. 



Requests for further information should be ad- 
dressed to the Dean, Cornell University-New York 
Hospital School of Nursing, 525 East 68th Street, 
New York 21, N. Y. 

An application form will be sent upon request 
to prospective students able to satisfy the re- 
quirements for admission. 



CORNELL UNIVERSITY OFFICIAL PUBLICATION 
VOLUME 35 : OCTOBER 1, 1943 NUMBER 6 



Announcement of 
Cornell University- New York Hospital 

School of Nursing 

for 1943-44 




525 FAST 68th STREET, NEW YORK 21, N. Y. 






CORNELL UNIVERSITY OFFICIAL PUBLICATION 

PUBLISHED BY CORNELL UNIVERSITY AT ITHACA, N. Y. 

Monthly in September, October, and November 
Semi-monthly, December to August inclusive 

[Entered as second-class matter, December 14, 1916, at the post office at 
Ithaca, New York, under the act of August 24, 1912] 




THE NEW YORK HOSPITAL, SOUTH VIEW 



CALENDAR 



1943 

Sept. 25 Saturday 

Sept. 27 Monday 

Oct. 12 Tuesday 

Nov. 25 Thursday 

Dec. 25 Saturday 



1944 




Jan. 1 


Saturday 


Jan. 15 


Saturday 


Jan. 16 


Sunday 


Jan. 17 


Monday 


Feb. 12 


Saturday 


Feb. 22 


Tuesday 


Feb. 28 


Monday 


May 7 


Sunday 


May 8 


Monday 


May 30 


Tuesday 


July 4 


Tuesday 


July 15 


Saturday 



Sept. 4 Monday 

Sept. 26 Tuesday 

Sept. 30 Saturday 

Oct. 1 Sunday 

Oct. 2 Monday 

Oct. 12 Thursday 

Nov. 23 Thursday 

Dec. 25 Monday 



Registration day (First-year students) 

First term begins 

Columbus Day — No classes except for first-year 

students 
Thanksgiving Day — No classes 
Christmas Day — No classes 



New Year's Day — No classes 

Last day for filing applications for February 

class 
First term ends 
Second term begins 
Lincoln's Birthday — No classes 
Washington's Birthday — No classes 
Registration day (First-year students, February 

class) 
Second term ends 
Third term begins 
Decoration Day — No classes 
Independence Day — No classes 
Last day for filing applications for September 

class 
Labor Day — No classes 
Commencement 
Registration day (First-year students, September 

class) 
Third term ends 
First term begins 
Columbus Day — No classes except for first-year 

students 
Thanksgiving Day — No classes 
Christmas Day — No classes 



Term dates apply to September admissions, 
for February sections. 



Adjustments necessary 




LOBBY OF NURSES RESIDENCE 



GENERAL STATEiMENT 



History 



CORNELL University-New York Hospital School of 
Nursing has the resources of two great institutions of 
learning, both of which have a long history and an envia- 
ble record of achievement in the fields of education and 
public welfare. 

Cornell University received its first endowment from the 
Federal Government's Educational Land Grant of 1862. 
The appropriation under the Morrill Act was to endow a 
college "where the leading object shall be ... to teach 
such branches of learning as are related to agriculture and 
the mechanical arts. ' ' This was the beginning of a remark- 
able system of higher education. It, however, received its 
greatest impetus through the vision and generosity of Ezra 
Cornell who, under the influence of Andrew D. White, his 
colleague and later the first president, determined the form 
of the new University. In 1864 an agreement was reached 
with the Legislature of New York State which resulted in 
the founding of "a University of a new type, ... an insti- 
tution where any person can find instruction in any study. 
This combination of Federal, State, and private interests 
and resources is unique. It gives strength to the organiza- 
tion, broadens the aims and policies of the University, and 
extends the influence of its educational ideals. 

It is interesting to note how one school after another has 
been organized and made a unit of this educational system, 
the most recent of which is the School of Nursing which 
was added in July, 1942. 

The school, known until recently as The New York Hos- 
pital School of Nursing, was organized in 1877 as an inte- 
gral part of The New York Hospital, the second oldest 
hospital in America maintained by private endowment. 
George the Third of England granted the hospital its 

[7] 



charter of incorporation on June 13, 1771, under the title 
of the Society of the Hospital in the City of New York in 
America. In 1810 the title was changed to The Society of 
the New York Hospital by an Act of the New York 
Legislature. 

This hospital has the distinction of being the first insti- 
tution in America devoted to the care of the sick to give 
organized instruction to its nursing personnel. It was in 
1799 that Doctor Valentine Seaman, a scholarly man and 
prominent physician, organized a series of lectures com- 
bined with a course of practical instruction in the wards. 
This cannot be considered the beginning of the school, but 
it certainly formed the groundwork. 

In June, 1927, The New York Hospital completed an 
association with Cornell University Medical College. Five 
years later they moved to their present location on York 
Avenue, between sixty-eighth and seventy-first streets. 
The increased facilities thus made available contributed to 
the progressive development of the school of nursing and 
it seemed only a natural consequence that on its sixty-fifth 
anniversary it became a unit in a great university. 

The school is justly proud of its sixteen hundred gradu- 
ates among whom are many who have nation-wide recog- 
nition for their outstanding contributions in the various 
fields of nursing. 

Registration of the School 

The School of Nursing is registered by the Regents of the 
University of the State of New York and its graduates are 
eligible to take the state board examinations for license as 
registered professional nurses. 

The school is accredited by the National League of Nurs- 
ing Education which functions as the Department of Edu- 
cation of the American Nurses' Association. 

The hospital is approved by the American College of 
Surgeons and is a member of the American Hospital Asso- 
ciation. It is also approved for internships by the American 
Medical Association. 

[8] 



Aims of the School of Nursing 

Nursing offers a challenge to young women with excep- 
tional personal and professional qualifications who are in- 
terested in social welfare. The aim of Cornell University- 
New York Hospital School of Nursing is to prepare care- 
fully selected students in the fundamental principles of 
nursing in its various clinical aspects as applied to home, 
hospital, and other community services, with emphasis 
upon health teaching. The development of the individual 
student as a responsible member of civic and social life is a 
significant outcome of the program. 

Facilities for the School 

A special building for the school of nursing is adjacent 
to the hospital buildings. It provides adequate and well 
equipped class-rooms, laboratories, library, and recreation 
rooms as well as attractive and comfortable living accom- 
modations for students and faculty. 

Further necessary laboratory and library facilities are 
available through association with the Cornell University 
Medical College. 

The clinical facilities of The New York Hospital are un- 
surpassed for the care and study of patients. The hospital 
with a capacity of over one thousand beds admits all types 
of patients including medical, surgical, obstetric, gyne- 
cological, pediatric, and psychiatric, and the out-patient 
department provides ample opportunity for the study of 
ambulatory patients. 

Close cooperation with the Henry Street Visiting Nurse 
Service and other community agencies affords opportuni- 
ties for observation in a community nursing program. 

The social service department of The New York Hospital 
participates in the nursing course through the integration 
of social service in the program of study. 

Requirements for Admission 

A qualifying certificate from the Board of Regents of the 
State of New York is necessary for admission. The form 
for requesting this certificate will be sent an applicant 

[9] 



from the office of the Dean of the School of Nursing after 
application for admission to the school has been filed. 

Requirements for admission include the satisfactory com- 
pletion of two years of work in an accredited college. Stu- 
dents of unusual merit and promise who have less than the 
above requirements may be given special consideration. 

The following units of study in an accredited high school 
or a recognized preparatory school are required : 

English 4 units 

History 1 unit 

Civics ]/ 2 unit 

Mathematics 2 units 

Algebra 1 unit 

Plane geometry 1 unit 

Science 2 units 

General science or biology. . . 1 unit 

Chemistry 1 unit 

Foreign language 3 units 

Three units of one language or two 
units of each of two 
Electives YA units 

Total 16 units 

It is recommended that prospective students include in 
their college program basic courses in general chemistry or 
inorganic and organic chemistry, zoology or biology, and 
the social sciences including psychology. Emphasis is 
placed upon scholarship of applicants. All students should 
review arithmetic prior to admission. 

Besides these scholastic admission requirements appli- 
cants should be at least eighteen and not over thirty years 
of age and must present evidence of physical and personal 
fitness for nursing. 

It is desirable that the applicant and her parent or 
guardian arrange for an interview with the Dean of the 
School of Nursing after formal application has been sub- 
mitted. An appointment will be made upon request. 

At their own expense applicants must also present a 
report from the Testing Service Division for Schools of 

[10] 



Nursing of the Psychological Corporation. Upon applica- 
tion to Cornell University-New York Hospital School of 
Nursing the card of application for admission to this 
examination will be forwarded to the applicant with 
necessary instructions. 

The Admissions Committee takes into account all in- 
formation received from these various sources in judging 
the suitability of an individual for admission to the school 
of nursing. 

An applicant must deposit $25.00 upon notification of 
acceptance for admission to the school. This deposit is 
credited toward fees payable on registration day but is not 
refundable if the applicant withdraws before that date. 

All applications for admission should be addressed to 
the Dean, Cornell University-New York Hospital School 
of Nursing, 525 East Sixty-eighth Street, New York 21, 
New York. 

(See "Calendar" for admission dates and last days j or filing 
applications^) 

Citizenship Requirements 

According to the law of New York State every per- 
son admitted to the examination for license as registered 
nurse in New York State at the termination of her course of 
study must submit evidence that she is a citizen of the 
United States or has declared her intention of becoming a 
citizen. Such a license shall terminate and become void at 
the end of seven years from such declaration of intention 
if the holder has not become a citizen. 

Advanced Standing 

An applicant who has received her baccalaureate degree 
may have her time in the school reduced by two to six 
months if she maintains an average of B in theory and in 
practice throughout the course. Exemption must be re- 
quested during the last term of the second year. 

United States Cadet Nurse Corps 

The United States Cadet Nurse Corps has been organized 
in an effort to meet the critical shortage in nursing services. 

[11] 



A unit of the Corps has been established in the school of 
nursing. Membership is voluntary and open to any student 
who is willing to agree to serve in military, governmental, 
or essential civilian nursing service until the end of 
hostilities. 

Applicants who wish to be enrolled in the Cadet Nurse 
Corps must meet the same admission requirements as other 
applicants. After registering in the school they have the 
same rights and privileges as other students and are eligible 
for state registration. 

Required fees and expenses will be paid through Federal 
funds for all students joining the Corps at least ninety 
days before the war ends. Their maintenance will be paid 
for the first six months. Thereafter maintenance is pro- 
vided by the school. Corps members will receive Federal 
stipends at the rate of $15-00 per month during the first 
nine months and $20.00 per month from the tenth through 
the thirtieth month. From the thirty-first through the 
thirty-sixth month the hospital agrees to pay a stipend 
of $30.00 per month. 

Attractive outdoor uniforms are provided and a dis- 
tinctive insignia will be worn on the indoor uniform. 

Members of the Cadet Corps who withdraw from the 
school for personal reasons, and not upon the advice of 
the school faculty, will be required to refund all stipends 
and all money paid to the school on their behalf. 

The Curriculum 

The three-year curriculum of the school of nursing is so 
planned as to give each student a thorough understanding 
of the basic sciences and principles underlying good nurs- 
ing and of the best methods to use in the care of the sick, 
in the prevention of disease, and in health education. 

The first and second years are divided into three terms 
each. The third year is divided into six terms and all formal 
teaching is completed in the first three terms. The last 
three terms are assigned to supervised practice in con- 
formity with the requirements of the United States Public 
Health Service for those schools participating in the U. S. 
Cadet Nurse Corps program. 

[12] 




STUDENT CARES FOR CONVALESCENT PATIENT IN SOLARIUM 




CONVALESCENT CHILDREN RECEIVE DIRECTION IN PLAY 



During the first term and a half of the first year limited 
nursing practice is given in the pavilions of the hospital 
and the clinics of the out-patient department while a 
greater amount of time is spent in class and laboratory. 
In subsequent terms the student's nursing practice increases 
in length of time and in responsibility. A sequence is 
planned to include the various types of clinical services 
during day, evening, and night periods. An introduction 
to community nursing is provided in order that the 
student may acquire a more complete understanding of 
patients' needs. 

During the clinical terms each student is scheduled forty- 
eight hours a week, which includes all class and nursing 
practice assignments. 

Scholarship Requirements for Promotion 
and Graduation 

The established system of grading is the literal scale of 
F to A, with D as the lowest passing grade. 

An average of C for a given term is required for pro- 
motion without condition. A grade of C is required in the 
course Introduction to Nursing Arts, and a grade of B in the 
course Drugs and Solutions. A grade below C in any clinical 
field of nursing practice or a term average which is less 
than C places a student on major warning. This must be 
removed by the end of the next term to insure further 
promotion. A student on major warning is ineligible to 
hold office in student organizations. 

A grade of incomplete (I) is assigned if the work of a 
course is not completed because of illness or unavoidable 
absence and if, in the judgment of the instructor, the stu- 
dent has shown evidence that she can complete the course 
satisfactorily in a reasonable length of time. 

A failure (F) in any given subject may necessitate with- 
drawal from the school unless the student's scholarship 
is exceptional in other respects, in which case repetition of 
the course may be recommended by the instructor. 

A cumulative average of C for three years' work is re- 
quired for graduation. 

[14] 



General Administrative Policies 

Cornell University-New York Hospital School of Nurs- 
ing reserves the privilege of retaining in the school only 
those students who in the judgment of its faculty satisfy 
the requirements of scholarship, health, and personal 
suitability for the nursing profession. 

It also reserves the prerogative of changing its curricu- 
lum, educational policies, and fees as deemed necessary 
for the progressive development of the school. 

Registration and Orientation 

First year students must be at the school not later than 
10:00 a.m. on registration day. (See "Calendar" for exact 
date.) 

A brief orientation program precedes formal instruction. 
During this time students have necessary physical examina- 
tions with Schick, Dick, and Mantoux tests, confer with 
faculty advisers, and secure uniforms, books, and other 
equipment. 

Degree and Diploma 

All students will receive a diploma in nursing from the 
Society of the New York Hospital upon satisfactory com- 
pletion of the course. Those students who enter the school 
with at least two years of college work acceptable to 
Cornell University will be granted in addition the degree 
of Bachelor of Science in Nursing from the University. 



[15 




THE GREEN DINING ROOM 




STUDY IN THE LIBRARY 



Fees 

First Year 

Matriculation Fee $11.00 

Administration Fee 20.00 

Tuition Fee 100.00 

Payable at registration $7500 

Payable at beginning of second 

term, first year 25.00 

Laboratory Fee 25.00 

Chemistry Breakage (refundable if not 

used) 5-00 

Library Fee 2.00 

Health Service Fee 10.00 

Rental Laboratory Coats 1.00 



Second Year 

Tuition Fee $50.00 

Library Fee 1.50 

Health Service Fee 500 



Third Year 

Tuition Fee $50.00 

Library Fee 1.50 

Health Service Fee 500 

Graduation Fee — degree students 20.00 

($15-00 for diploma students) 
Payable at beginning of fifth term, third 
year. Refundable if student is not gradu- 
ated. 
Rental Public Health Uniforms 1.50 



$174.00 



56.50 



78.00 



Grand Total $308.50 

In addition to these fees students pay a Student Activity 
Fee of $5.25 each year which is collected by the class 
treasurer. 

[17] 



Maintenance and General Expenses 

The school of nursing provides maintenance and limited 

gratuitous care in case of illness. Each student is furnished 

with uniforms and caps which remain the property of the 

school. 

The following estimated expenses must be met by the 

student: 

1st yr. 
1st term 2nd yr. 3rd yr. Optional 

Uniform aprons, bibs, and 

accessories $26.00 $3-00 

Uniform shoes 8.60 8.60 

Uniform sweater 4.25 

Uniform cape $15.00 

Gymnasium suits 10.00 

Books, keys, bandage scis- 
sors, and miscellaneous 
supplies 30.00 $5-00 5-00 10.00 

Expenses for Public Health 

and other observations. . 2.00 2.00 25.00 



$80.85 $7.00 $41.60 $25.00 

None of the aforementioned articles should be purchased 
before admission to the school. Students should be pro- 
vided with an allowance for other personal needs deter- 
mined by individual requirements. A list of limited neces- 
sary personal equipment will be sent each prospective stu- 
dent when accepted for admission. For the three-year 
course the total cost to the student should not exceed four 
hundred fifty dollars in addition to personal expenditures 
as determined by the student. 

Health Regulations and Service 

The school of nursing maintains a health service for its 
students. A well equipped infirmary with necessary staff is 
provided in the nurses' residence. A physical examination 
by the school physician with chest x-rays is required upon 
admission to the school and subsequent annual physical 
examinations will be given. 

[18] 



Vaccinations against typhoid fever and smallpox will be 
required of all students before admission to the school. 
Schick and Dick tests and immunization for positive reac- 
tion to the Schick test will be required of all students 
after admission to the school. Mantoux tests will be 
given during the pre-clinical period and for those who 
are negative will be repeated at regular intervals. 

Gratuitous infirmary care for minor illnesses will be 
limited to four weeks at any one time in the case of all stu- 
dents. For more serious illnesses students will be cared for 
gratuitously in the hospital for not more than two weeks 
at any one time for the first-year students, and not more 
than four weeks at any one time for second and third year 
students. Expenses for special nursing care and special 
therapies must be borne by the student or her family. 

Vacations and Other Absences 

A vacation of four weeks is given in each of the first 
two years and two weeks in the third year. Students who 
have an exemption of time are not granted a vacation in the 
third year. All vacations are arranged to conform to the 
requirements of the educational program and the fields in 
which clinical practice is obtained. 

As a result of absences the repetition of a course of study 
or special examinations may be required; class registration 
may be changed and in necessary instances nursing practice 
will have to be made up. 

Loan Funds 

Student loan funds have been established for those who 
need financial aid and show promise in nursing. Appli- 
cation should be made in writing to the Dean of the School. 

Extracurricular Opportunities 

Believing that the education of young women today 
must include activities relating to healthful social rela- 
tionships, generous provision for this development in the 
life of the student has been made. 

The beautiful fireproof, sixteen-story residence, erected 
adjacent to the hospital buildings, is the center for these 

[19] 



activities. Every effort has been made in its construction 
and equipment to provide for the normal and healthy life 
of students and faculty. 

Each of the eight student residence floors contains at- 
tractively furnished single bedrooms with lavatories, 
ample common baths, showers, and toilet facilities, a com- 
mon sitting-room with adjoining kitchenette for informal 
gatherings, and a laundryette. 

Comfortable lounges, reading, reception, and dining- 
rooms are on the first and ground floors. 

For further recreational activities, a large, well equipped 
gymnasium, game-rooms, tennis courts, and porches are 
available. Arrangements for the use of an indoor swimming 
pool are made. 

To insure the full benefit and proper use of these facilities, 
well-qualified instructors are appointed to direct the social 
and recreational activities of the school. 

School Government 

The school of nursing has a cooperative government in 
which the students take an active part. A student organi- 
zation has been established and functions with the Faculty 
Committee on Student Extracurricular Activities in all 
matters relating to social and professional conduct and 
discipline. 

An annual student activities fee of $5-25 is required and 
collected bv each class. 



[20] 




A ROOM OF HER OWN 




SUNDAY MORNING BREAKFAST IN THE FLOOR SITTING ROOM 



THE CURRICULUM 



First Year 

Class and Approx- 
Labora- imate 
tory Hours 

Hours Practice 
(Orientation — 28 hours, includes Personal 
Hygiene — 8 hours, and Personality Study 

— 6 hours) 28 

Anatomy 60 

Chemistry 55 

Microbiology 68 

Physiology 48 

History of Nursing 24 

Elementary Psychology 30 

Psychology of Deviate Behavior 15 

Introduction to Nursing Arts 118 300 

Professional Adjustments 1 15 

Nutrition and Cookery 30 

Diet Therapy 30 

Social and Economic Aspects of Health and 

Disease 30 

Pharmacology and Therapeutics 30 

Medicine 30 

Communicable Diseases 22 

Medical Nursing 30 480 

Surgery 38 

Surgical Nursing 30 480 

Totals 731 1260 



[22] 






Second Year 

Class and Approx- 

Labora- imate 

tory Hours 

Hours Practice 

Medical Nursing 192 

Diet Therapy Practice 192 

Operative Technique 15 359 

Pediatrics 30 

Pediatric Nursing 30 698 

Obstetrics and Gynecology 30 

Obstetric and Gynecological Nursing 30 698 

Development of Behavior in Children 30 

Totals 165 2139 

Third Year 
(Accelerated program) 

First half of year 

Medical Nursing 8 172 

Surgical Nursing 8 172 

Emergency Nursing 22 

Professional Adjustments II 15 

Psychiatry 30 

Psychiatric Nursing 30 316 

Family and Community Health 20 

Community Nursing 84 

Out-Patient Nursing 260 

Second half of year 

Medical Nursing 240 

Surgical Nursing 240 

Psychiatric Nursing 384 

Private Patients Nursing 192 

Out-Patient Nursing 192 

: Totals 133 2252 

Grand Total Hours 1029 5651 

Two or more hours a week of bedside instruction and individual 
conferences, which approximate a total of 244 hours, are included in 
practice assignments. 

For Physical Education see Description of Courses. 

[23] 



DESCRIPTION OF COURSES 

Preclinical Sciences 

100. Anatomy 

This course includes both gross and microscopical 
anatomy. The gross anatomy is taught by lectures, demon- 
strations, and student dissection of the cadaver. The 
microscopical work is directly correlated with the gross 
dissection and includes a detailed study of prepared slides. 
Significant embryological information is included in the 
lectures. 

60 Hours, First Year 

Dr. Hinsey, Dr. Yntema, Dr. Hammond 

101. Chemistry 

A course designed to acquaint students with the funda- 
mental principles of inorganic and physiological chemistry 
with special application to nursing practice. Studies in the 
general composition of the blood and urine, and in the 
digestion and utilization of foods are included. Lectures, 
recitations, demonstrations, and laboratory. 
55 Hours, First Year 
Dr. DuVigneaud, Miss Rynbergen, 
Dr. Chandler, Mrs. Lee, Mrs. Young 

102. Microbiology 

The study of the habits and morphology of microorgan- 
isms emphasizing those of pathogenic character; sources, 
modes, and prevention of infection; disinfection and asep- 
sis; the more important tissue changes occurring in the 
healing process, infections, and neoplasms; clinical micro- 
scopy of the blood and blood grouping; kidney function 
and urinalysis. Practical demonstrations and applications 
are made which relate directly to nursing. The blood group 
of each student is ascertained and recorded. Lectures, reci- 
tations, and laboratory. 

68 Hours, First Year 

Dr. Barr, Dr. Stillman, Miss Watson 

[24] 






103- Pharmacology and Therapeutics 

A course designed to acquaint the student with the fun- 
damental weights, measures, terms, and symbols used in 
the preparation and administration of drugs, common anti- 
septics, disinfectants, and other solutions. A study of im- 
portant and commonly used drugs, their preparation, dos- 
age, administration, physiological and therapeutic ac- 
tions, idiosyncrasies, cumulative and minor toxic symp- 
toms, antidotes and emergency treatments. Emphasis is 
placed on the accurate administration of drugs and the 
careful observation of their effects through supervised 
practice in nursing courses. 

30 Hours, First Year 
Dr. Cattell, Miss Daum 
104. Physiology 

This course is designed to give a basic understanding of 
the functions of the normal human body as an essential 
prerequisite to the study of health and nutrition and the 
pathological changes due to disease. Lectures, recitations, 
demonstrations, and laboratory. 

48 Hours, First Year 

Dr. DuBois, Miss Rynbergen, 

Dr. Hitchcock, Dr. Muller, Mrs. Young. 

Medical Nursing 

110. Medicine 

Medical aspects of diseases are considered in these lec- 
tures and clinics. Material presented will supplement, em- 
phasize, and interpret required reading covering etiology, 
sources of infection, symptomatology, usual course pathol- 
ogy, complications, treatment, prognosis, and prevention. 

30 Hours, First Year 
Dr. Barr and staff 

111. Communicable Diseases 

A study of communicable diseases, including tuberculo- 
sis. Special emphasis is placed upon etiology, modes of 
transmission, and prevention. Lectures and clinics. 

22 Hours, First Year 
Dr. Barr and staff 

[25] 




NUTRITION AND COOKERY CLASS 




SURGICAL TECHNIQUE DEMONSTRATED TO FIRST-YEAR STUDENTS 



112. Principles of Medical Nursing Including Communi- 
cable Disease Nursing 
Through lectures, clinics, and demonstrations, students 
are taught principles and methods of nursing as applied to 
the care of medical patients. In the third year emphasis is 
placed upon managerial and teaching problems and the 
newer methods of treatment are presented. 

30 Hours, First Year 
8 Hours, Third Year 
Miss Lyons 
Miss Daum, Miss Fritz 

113- Practice of Medical Nursing Including Communicable 
Disease Nursing 
Supervised practice and study of the application of medi- 
cal nursing principles and methods to the care of patients 
on the medical pavilions of the hospital. In addition stu- 
dents study and practice medical aseptic nursing as related 
to the care of patients suffering from communicable dis- 
eases including tuberculosis. Practice includes care of pa- 
tients and managerial experience during day, evening, and 
night. Demonstrations and conferences. 

1084 Hours, First, Second, and Third Years 
(Includes 384 hours of communicable disease nursing) 
Miss Lyons, Miss Daum, Miss Fritz, Miss Henderson, 
Miss Hills, Miss Lalime, Miss Vernstrom and staff 

114. Practice in Care of Private Patients 

Application of principles of medical and surgical nursing 
to the care of private patients. 

192 Hours, Third Year 

Miss Moffatt, Mrs. Miller and staff" 

Nursing 
120. Orientation. 

This course is designed to give the beginning student a 
general conception of the field of nursing; the responsibili- 
ties and obligations of each individual in choosing the pro- 
fession; the importance of general conduct in building up 
the right habits of living and attitudes of the nurse. In- 

[27] 



eludes lectures in personal hygiene and personality study, 
emphasizing the importance of physical and mental health 
especially as it relates to the life of the nurse and is re- 
flected in her work. 

28 Hours, First Year 

Miss Parker, Miss Kennedy, Miss Frost, 

Dr. Doty, Dr. Tyndall, Miss McDermott 

121. a. Introduction to Nursing Arts 

A course designed to give the student a basic understand- 
ing of the principles of nursing with emphasis upon her at- 
titude toward her patient, the existing social relationships, 
the physical requirements for the proper care of patients, 
and the procedures found most helpful for the promotion 
of health. Lectures and demonstrations. 

118 Hours, First Year 
Miss Stone 

121. b. Practice of Elementary Nursing 

The application of the theories of nursing in laboratory 
practice, in the surgical supply room, and in the actual 
care of convalescent patients in the pavilions and out- 
patient department of the hospital. 

300 Hours, First Year 
Miss Stone, Miss Zorn 

122. History of Nursing 

A survey of the historical development of nursing from 
its early conception to modern times. Lectures and panel 
discussions. 

24 Hours, First Year 
Miss Frost 

123. Professional Adjustments I 

A general consideration of fundamental ethical and phil- 
osophical principles and their application to problems 
which arise in the practice of nursing. An attempt is made 
to coordinate this course closely with each course of nurs- 
ing practice through class discussions of pertinent prob- 
lems. Lectures and conferences. 

15 Hours, First Year 

Miss Frost and Special Lecturers 

[28] 



124. Professional Adjustments II 

Through a general survey of the nursing field, the stu- 
dent has an opportunity to learn the trends and advances in 
the profession; the need and opportunities for specialized 
preparation; the importance and types of legislation; the 
activities of professional organizations and the obligations 
of their members. Lectures and conferences. 

15 Hours, Third Year 
Miss Parker and Special Lecturers 

125. Emergency Nursing 

This course supplements the instruction in nursing and 
deals with the application of these principles to emergency 
situations in the home and community. Lectures and 
demonstrations. First Aid certificate granted by American 
Red Cross. 

22 Hours, Third Year 
Dr. Redden 

See description of other courses in nursing relating to 
specific clinical fields. 

Nutrition 

130. Nutrition and Cookery 

An elementary course in normal adult nutrition and in 
food preparation. In addition, the nutrition requirements 
in childhood and in pregnancy are discussed during the 
student's practice on pediatric and obstetric services. 

30 Hours, First Year 
Miss Rynbergen, Mrs. Young 

131. Diet Therapy 

A course designed to present the underlying principles 
in treatment of disease by means of special dietaries; given 
concurrently with the lectures in Medical and Surgical 
Diseases. This course is supplemented by conference work 
during the student's practice on medical and surgical 
services. Lectures, recitations, and laboratory. 

30 Hours, First Year 
Miss Rynbergen, Mrs. Young 

[29] 




TENNIS IS A HEALTHFUL RECREATION 



132. Practice of Diet Therapy 

The application of the principles of diet therapy in super- 
vised practice on the pavilions in the hospital. Conferences 
and case studies. 

192 Hours, Second Year 

Miss Gillam, Miss Rynbergen, Mrs. Young, 

Miss Livingston, Miss Skinner 



Obstetrics and Gynecology 

140. Obstetrics and Gynecology 

This course deals with physiological and pathological 
changes during pregnancy, labor, and puerperium; the care 
of the normal newborn; the nutrition of the mother and 
baby; the prevention of complications; the social signifi- 
cance of infant and maternal mortality; the relation of 
obstetrics to various gynecological conditions; the results 
of infection and tumor growth and the required surgical 
interference and operative treatment. Lectures. 

30 Hours, Second Year 
Dr. Stander and staff 
Miss Rynbergen 

141. Principles of Obstetric and Gynecological Nursing 

This course emphasizes the importance of prenatal in- 
struction, observation, and care; infant, obstetric, and 
gynecological nursing procedure with particular attention 
to infections and their special therapy. Classes, demonstra- 
tions, and conferences. 

30 Hours, Second Year 

Miss Hickcox, Miss Boyle, Miss Darbois, 

Miss Geuss, Miss Klein 

142. Practice of Obstetric and Gynecological Nursing 

Under supervised practice in the pavilions, nurseries, 
operating rooms, labor and delivery rooms, and out- 
patient department, students have the opportunity to 

[31] 



observe and care for infants and obstetric and gynecologi- 
cal patients. Nursing practice, case studies, and conferences. 

698 Hours, Second Year 

Miss Hickcox, Mrs. Bourgeois, Miss Darbois, 

Miss Geuss, Miss Klein, Miss Walters and 

staff 

Miss Frost, Miss Boyle 

Pediatrics 

150. Pediatrics 

This course emphasizes the influence of social, economic, 
and medical contributions on normal growth and de- 
velopment. Through a study of representative diseases of 
infancy and childhood, the resulting effects on morbidity 
and mortality are shown. Lectures and clinics. 

30 Hours, Second Year 
Dr. Levine and staff 

151. Principles of Pediatric Nursing 

The basic principles in the care of well and sick infants 
and children are given together with the social, educa- 
tional, and nutritional aspects of their treatment and be- 
havior as normal children. Classes, conferences, and 
demonstrations. 

30 Hours, Second Year 

Miss Schubert, Miss Ferguson, Mrs. Overholser, 

Miss Rebentisch, Miss Woodfall and staff 

152. Practice of Pediatric Nursing 

This consists of supervised experience in aseptic nursing 
methods in the care of infants and children in the pavilion, 
formula laboratory, premature nursery, and out-patient 
department. Case studies and conferences. 

698 Hours, Second Year 

Miss Schubert, Miss Ferguson, Miss Kelly, 

Miss Meigs, Miss Rebentisch, Miss Woodfall 

and staff 

Mrs. Overholser, Miss Correll 

[32] 



153- Development of Behavior in Children 

A study of the normal child and his behavior. The sus- 
ceptibility of the child's behavior responses to the various 
details of family life and of school will be emphasized. 
Lectures and recitations. 

30 Hours, Second Year 
Miss Whitley 

Personal Hygiene and Public Health 

Personal Hygiene 

(8 hours — Included in 120. Orientation.) 

160. Physical Education 

Each student will be required to participate in regular 
physical exercise. This program is designed primarily to 
maintain positive health with emphasis upon posture and 
corrective measures and to stimulate sportsmanship. 

64 Hours, Each Year 

Miss McDermott and Miss Sawyer 

161. Social and Economic Aspects of Health and Disease 

This course attempts to relate the care of the patient in 
the hospital to the home and the community situation. 
Discussion of the nurse's part in the prevention of illness 
and the promotion of health. Lectures and conferences. 

30 Hours, First Year 
Miss Frost, Miss Soule 

162. Family and Community Health 

An introduction to the study of public health; local, 
state, and national services. In connection with field obser- 
vations a brief survey of public health nursing is given; 
its development, aims, opportunities, requirements, and 
preparation. Lectures. 

20 Hours, Third Year 
Dr. Smillie, Miss Frost 

[33] 



163. Community Nursing Principles and Practice 

Nursing practice in the out-patient department; visits of 
observation to community agencies; contact with the 
home through the social service department and public 
health nursing agencies in the community. 

452 Hours, Third Year 

Medical and Surgical Out-Patient Department 

Miss Frost, Miss Reid, Miss Rolfe and staff 

Social Service Department, Miss Soule and staff 

84 Hours, Third Year 

Observation, Henry Street Visiting Nurse Service 



Psychiatry 

170. Psychiatry 

A course of study designed to acquaint students with 
psychopathic conditions, their etiology, pathology, and 
treatment. Included in this course is an historical survey of 
psychiatry and the mental hygiene movement, a discussion 
of the problems most frequently found in the different 
periods of human development: nursery school age, pre- 
puberty, adolescent, climactic, and senile. An introduction 
to the techniques and social agencies available in helping 
people meet their problems. 

30 Hours, Third Year 
Dr. Diethelm and staff 

171. Principles of Psychiatric Nursing 

This course is organized to give students an understand- 
ing of the basic principles in the nursing care of personality 
disorders and the nursing procedures used in their treat- 
ment. Emphasis is placed also upon the relation of emotion- 
al disturbances to physical illness and of early development 
to future adult life. Lectures, demonstrations, and clinics. 

30 Hours, Third Year 

Miss Sprogell, Miss Corrigan, Miss Joinville, 

Miss Lewis, Miss Noble and staff 

[34] 



172. a. Practice of Psychiatric Nursing 

The application of the principles of psychiatric nursing 
through supervised practice in and conferences on the care 
of adults both in the in-patient and out-patient depart- 
ments. Behavior studies and case studies. Two eight-weeks 
periods. 

630 Hours, Third Year 

Miss Sprogell, Miss Corrigan, Miss Joinville, 

Miss Lewis, Miss Noble and staff 

172. b. Special Therapeutics in Psychiatric Nursing 

An opportunity is given the student for observation and 
practice in hydrotherapy, occupational and recreational 
therapies, with special emphasis on needs of the individual 
patient. Conferences and supervised practice. 

70 Hours, Third Year, Second Period 
Miss Spargo, Miss Brindle 

Psychology 

180. Elementary Psychology 

An introduction to the study of human behavior and the 
underlying principles of mental adjustments and habit for- 
mation. An effort is made to apply this study to the stu- 
dent's own personality and give her a more scientific basis 
by which she can get a better understanding of the be- 
havior of herself, her co-workers, and her patients. 
Lectures and recitations. 

30 Hours, First Year 
Miss Kennedy 

181. Psychology of Deviate Behavior 

A study of the deviations in behavior of adults and 
children, due to organic and sociological factors, and of 
the nursing care necessary in assisting patients in making 
more adequate adjustments during illness. The principles 
of mental hygiene are emphasized. Lectures and recitations. 

15 Hours, First Year 
Miss Kennedy 

Development of Behavior in Children (See Pediatrics) 

[35] 



Surgical Nursing 
190. Surgery 

Surgical aspects of diseases are presented in these lectures 
and clinics. Factors determining the need for surgical 
interference are discussed and the major steps in the opera- 
tion outlined. Special emphasis is placed upon signs, 
symptoms, and observations which should be made both 
preceding and following operation. 

38 Hours, First Year 
Dr. Heuer and staff 



191- Principles of Surgical Nursing 

Through lectures and demonstrations students are taught 
the principles and methods of surgical asepsis aud the nurs- 
ing of surgical patients. In the third year emphasis is 
placed upon managerial aud teaching problems, and the 
newer methods of treatment are presented. 

30 Hours, First Year 
8 Hours, Third Year 
Miss Lyons, Miss Fedder, Miss Harmon, 
Miss Newton, Miss Sturtevant 



192. Practice of Surgical Nursing 

Supervised practice and study of the application of nurs- 
ing principles to the care of patients on surgical pavilions 
of the hospital. Practice includes care of patients and 
managerial experience during the day, evening, and night. 
Demonstrations and conferences. 

892 Hours, First and Third Years 

Miss Lyons, Miss Fedder, Miss Harmon, 

Miss Henderson, Miss Hills, 

Miss Newton, Miss Sturtevant, 

Miss Vernstrom and staff 

[36] 



193- Operative Technique 

This course is designed to give the student a thorough 
understanding of surgical aseptic technique. It is planned 
to develop dexterity and intelligent response in assisting 
with operations and in meeting surgical emergencies. 
Experience is given in the general operating room and 
the gynecological operating room. 

15 Hours, lectures, demonstrations, and conferences 

359 Hours, practice, Second Year 

Miss Lyons, Miss Haslup, Miss Gemski and staff 




STUDY IN A CONFERENCE ROOM 



[37] 



CORNELL UNIVERSITY-NEW YORK 
HOSPITAL SCHOOL OF NURSING 

STAFF OF ADMINISTRATION 

Edmund Ezra Day President of the University 

Bessie A. R. Parker Acting Dean 

Harriet Frost Associate Director 

May Kennedy Associate Director 

ASSISTANTS IN ADMINISTRATION 

Flora J. Bergstrom Librarian 

Ella L. Bullen Secretary 

Alice Harriman Registrar 

EXECUTIVE FACULTY 

Edmund Ezra Day 

Harriet Frost Sarah E. Moore 

Verda F. Hickcox Bessie A. R. Parker 

Joseph C. Hinsey Olive M. Reid 

May Kennedy Agnes Schubert 

Veronica Lyons Carolyne A. Sprogell 

Alice M. Moffatt Henricus J. Stander 



[38] 



ALUMNAE COMMITTEE OF 
THE SCHOOL OF NURSING 

Mary Beard, Chairman 
Minnie H. Jordan Annie W. Goodrich, Vice Chairman 

STANDING COMMITTEES OF THE FACULTY 

Committee on Curriculum 
Bessie A. R. Parker, Chairman Verda Hickcox 
David P. Barr May Kennedy 

OSKAR DlETHELM VERONICA LYONS 

Eugene F. Du Bois Agnes Schubert 

Harriet Frost Thelma Stone 

Committee on Nursing Principles and Practice 
Thelma Stone, Chairman Kathleen Newton 

Catherine P. Geuss Daphne Rolfe 

Margaret Joinville Carol Sturtevant 

Ruth Woodfall 

Committee on Admissions 
Eleanor M. Corrigan, Chairman 
Helen M. Daum Sarah E. Moore 

Elizabeth Harmon Margery T. Overholser 

Thelma Stone 

Eugene F. Bradford, Director of Admissions, 
Cornell University, Member ex-officio 

Committees on Promotion 

FIRST YEAR STUDENTS 

Thelma Stone, Chairman Rita Genner 

Edna Fritz Elizabeth Harmon 

Adele Sawyer 

second year students 
Veronica Lyons, Chairman Sarah M. Ferguson 

Frances L. Boyle Martha Haslup 

Hedwig Darbois Henderika Rynbergen 



The Dean and Associate Directors are members ex-officio of all com- 
mittees. 

[39] 



THIRD YEAR STUDENTS 

Carolyne A. Sprogell, Chairman 
Helen Daum Daphne Rolfe 

Alice M. Moffatt Carol Sturtevant 

Library Committee 
May Kennedy, Chairman Elizabeth Harmon 

Flora J. Bergstrom Genevieve Noble 

Hedwig Darbois J ean Rebentisch 

Edna Fritz Olive M. Reid 

Harriet Frost Henderika Rynbergen 

Committee on Records 
May Kennedy, Chairman Alice M. Moffatt 

Verda F. Hickcox Olive M. Reid 

Veronica Lyons Agnes Schubert 

Carolyne A. Sprogell 

Committee on Student and Staff Health 
Harriet Frost, Chairman Veronica Lyons 

Rita Genner Helen Miller 

Margaret Joinville Olive M. Reid 

Mary E. Klein Agnes Schubert 

Marian Tyndall 

Committee on Scholarship Aid and Student Loan 
May Kennedy, Chairman Helen M. Daum 

Agnes Schubert 

Committee on Affiliating Students 
Agnes Schubert, Chairman Frances Boyle 

Verda F. Hickcox 

Com??iittee on Graduate Courses 
Verda F. Hickcox, Chairman Veronica Lyons 
Martha Haslup Olive M. Reid 

Carolyne A. Sprogell 

Committee on Student Extra-Curricular Activities 
Margery T. Overholser, Chairman 
Hedwig Darbois Eleanor Lewis 

Catherine P. Geuss Mary T. McDermott 

[40] 



FACULTY 

Edmund Ezra Day, B.S., M.A., Ph.D., LL.D., 

President of the University 

Cornelius Betten, Ph.D., D.Sc, Dean of the University Faculty 

PROFESSORS 

Bessie A. R. Parker, B.S., R.N., Professor of Nursing, Acting Dean of the 

School of Nursing and Acting Director of the Nursing Service 
Diploma in Nursing, Rhode Island Hospital Training School for Nurses, 
Providence, Rhode Island, 1918; B.S., Teachers College, Columbia 
University, 1937. 

Harriet Frost, R.N., Professor of Nursing, Associate Director of the 

School of Nursing. 
Diploma in Nursing, St. John's Hospital, Yonkers, New York, 1906. 

May Kennedy, M.A., R.N., Professor of Nursing, Associate Director of 

the School of Nursing. 
Diploma in Nursing, St. Joseph's Hospital, Chicago, Illinois, 1907; 
B.S., Teachers College, Columbia University, 1917; M.A., University 
of Chicago, 1932. 

ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS 

Verda F. Hickcox, B.S., R.N., Associate Professor of Nursing, Head of 

Obstetric and Gynecological Nursing Service, 
Diploma in Nursing, Presbyterian Hospital School for Nurses, Chicago, 
Illinois, 1916; B.S., Teachers College, Columbia University, 1927. 

Olive M. Reid, A.B., R.N., Associate Professor of Nursing, Head of Out- 
Patient Nursing Service. 
A.B., Western College for Women, 1916; Diploma in Nursing, Army 
School of Nursing, Washington, D. C, 1921. 

Agnes Schubert, M.S., R.N., Associate Professor of Nursing, Head of 

Pediatric Nursing Service. 
B.S., Northwestern University, 1917; Diploma in Nursing, Western 
Reserve University School of Nursing, Chicago, Illinois, 1926; M.S., 
Teachers College, Columbia University, 1932. 

Carolyne A. Sprogell, B.S., R.N., Associate Professor of Nursing, 

Director, Psychiatric Nursing Service. 
Diploma in Nursing, St. Lukes Hospital School of Nursing, New York, 
New York, 1924; B.S., Teachers College, Columbia University, 1936. 

[41] 



ASSISTANT PROFESSORS 

Eleanor M. Corrigan, B.S., R.N., Assistant Professor of Nursing, 

Administrative Assistant, Psychiatric Nursing Service. 
Diploma in Nursing, St. Lukes Hospital School of Nursing, New York, 
New York, 1927; B.S., Teachers College, Columbia University, 1940. 

Helen M. Daum, M.A., R.N., Assistant Professor of Nursing, Supervisor, 

Medical Nursing Service. 
Diploma in Nursing, The New York Hospital School of Nursing, New 
York, New York, 1918; B.S., Teachers College, Columbia University, 
1932; M.A., ibid, 1941. 

Catherine P. Geuss, M.A., R.N., Assistant Professor of Nursing, Super- 
visor, Obstetric and Gynecological Nursing Service. 
Diploma in Nursing, Michael Reese Hospital School of Nursing, 
Chicago, Illinois, 1928; B.S., Teachers College, Columbia University, 
1932; M. A., ibid., 1942. 

Mary Elizabeth Klein, B.S., R.N., Assistant Professor of Nursing, 

Supervisor, Obstetric and Gynecological Nursing Service. 
Diploma in Nursing, Hahnemann Hospital School of Nursing, Phila- 
delphia, Pennsylvania, 1916; B.S., Teachers College, Columbia Uni- 
versity, 1936. 

Veronica Lyons, B.S., R.N., Assistant Professor of Nursing, Head of 

Medical and Surgical Nursing Service. 
Diploma in Nursing, The Johns Hopkins Hospital School for Nurses, 
1927; B.S., Teachers College, Columbia University, 1936. 

Mary T. McDermott, M.A., Assistant Professor of Physical Education, 

Director, Nurses' Residence. 
Diploma, Bouve Boston School of Physical Education, Boston, Massa- 
chusetts, 1916; B.S., New York University, 1930; M.A., ibid., 1932. 

Alice Maud Moffatt, R.N., Assistant Professor of Nursing, Head of 

Private Patients Nursing Service. 
Diploma in Nursing, The New York Hospital School of Nursing, New 
York, New York, 1912. 

Sarah E. Moore, R.N., Assistant Professor of Nursing, Administrative 

Assistant, Day Nursing Service. 
Diploma in Nursing, The New York Hospital School of Nursing, New 
York, New York, 1913- 

Margery Treiber Overholser, B.S., R.N., Assistant Professor of Nurs- 
ing, Supervisor, Pediatric Out-Patient Nursing Service. 
Diploma in Nursing, Wesley Memorial Hospital School of Nursing, 
Chicago, Illinois, 1922; B.S., Teachers College, Columbia University, 
1927. 

[42] 



Henderika J. Rynbergen, M.S., Assistant Professor of Sciences. 
B.S., Simmons College, 1922; M.S., Cornell University Medical Col- 
lege, 1938. 

INSTRUCTORS 

Frances Lucretia Boyle, R.N., Instructor in Nursing, Supervisor, 

Obstetric Out-Patient Nursing Service. 
Diploma in Nursing, Moses Taylor Hospital, Scranton, Pennsylvania, 
1924. 

Hedwig Darbois, R.N., Instructor in Nursing, Supervisor, Obstetric and 

Gynecological Nursing Service. 
Diploma in Nursing, The New York Hospital School of Nursing, New 
York, New York, 1937. 

Helma Fedder, B.S., R.N., Instructor in Nursing, Supervisor, Surgical 

Nursing Service. 
Diploma in Nursing, Washington University School of Nursing, St. 
Louis, Missouri, 1933; B.S., University of Chicago, 1942. 

Sarah M. Ferguson, R.N., Instructor in Nursing, Supervisor, Pediatric 

Nursing Service. 
Diploma in Nursing, Children's Hospital School of Nursing, Boston, 
Massachusetts, 1932. 

Edna Fritz, M.A., R.N., Instructor in Nursing, Supervisor, Medical 

Nursing Service. 
Diploma in Nursing, Russell Sage College School of Nursing, Troy, 
New York, 1940; B.S., ibid., 1940; M.A., Teachers College, Columbia 
University, 1942. 

Elizabeth Harmon, B.A., R.N., Instructor in Nursing, Supervisor, 

Surgical Nursing Service. 
B.A., College of Wooster, 1928; Diploma in Nursing, Presbyterian 
Hospital School of Nursing, Chicago, Illinois, 1931. 

Martha Woodburn Haslup, R.N., Instructor in Nursing, Supervisor, 

General Operating Rooms. 
Diploma in Nursing, The Johns Hopkins Hospital School of Nursing, 

Baltimore, Maryland, 1929. 

Thirza Hills, B.S., R.N., Instructor in Nursing, Supervisor, Medical and 

Surgical Nursing Service. 
Diploma in Nursing, Presbyterian Hospital School for Nurses, Chicago, 
Illinois, 1925; B.S., Teachers College, Columbia University, 1942. 

[43] 



Margaret Joinville, B.S., R.N., Instructor in Nursing, Supervisor, 

Psychiatric Nursing Service. 
Diploma in Nursing, The Army School of Nursing, Washington, D. C, 
1929; B.S., Teachers College, Columbia University, 1941. 

Eleanor Lewis, B.A., B.N., R.N., Instructor in Nursing, Supervisor, 
Psychiatric Out-Patient Nursing Service. 

B.A., Radcliffe College, 1925; B.N., Yale University School of Nursing, 
New Haven, Connecticut, 1928. 

Kathlene Newton, B.S., R.N., Instructor in Nursing, Supervisor, Surgical 

Nursing Service. 
B.S. in General Sciences, University of Washington, 1934; Diploma in 
Nursing, ibid., 1936; B.S. in Nursing Education, ibid., 1936. 

Genevieve Noble, M.A., R.N., Instructor in Nursing, Supervisor, 

Psychiatric Nursing Service. 
B.A., Goucher College, 1932; M.A., Teachers College, Columbia Uni- 
versity, 1927; Diploma in Nursing, Presbyterian Hospital School of 
Nursing, New York, New York, 1938. 

Jean I. Rebentisch, B.S., R.N., Instructor in Nursing, Supervisor, Pedi- 
atric Nursing Service. 
Diploma in Nursing, Methodist Hospital School of Nursing, Brooklyn, 
New York, 1929; B.S., Teachers College, Columbia University, 1940. 

Daphne Rolfe, B.S., R.N., Instructor in Nursing, Supervisor, Out-Patient 

Nursing Service. 
Diploma in Nursing, The American Hospital of Paris, Paris, France, 
1933; B.S., Teachers College, Columbia University, 1940. 

Thelma L. Stone, B.S., R.N., Instructor in Nursing Arts. 

Diploma in Nursing, The New York Hospital School of Nursing, New 

York, New York, 1936; B.S., Simmons College, 1941. 

Carol J. Sturtevant, R.N., Instructor in Nursing, Supervisor, Surgical 

Nursing Service. 
Diploma in Nursing, St. Agnes School of Nursing, Fond du Lac, Wis- 
consin, 1934. 

ASSISTANTS 

Marguerite Bourgeois, M.S., R.N., Assistant in Nursing, Supervisor, 

Obstetric and Gynecological Nursing Service. 
B.S., Massachusetts State College, 1931; Diploma in Nursing, Massa- 
chusetts General Hospital School of Nursing, Boston, Massachusetts, 
1936; M.S., Massachusetts State College, 1937. 

[44] 



Frances Farthing, B.S., R.N., Assistant in Nursing Arts. 
B.S., Appalachian College, 1935; Diploma in Nursing, Cornell Uni- 
versity-New York Hospital School of Nursing, New York, New York, 
1942; B.S. in Nursing, Cornell University, 1943- 

Rita Malloch Genner, R.N., Assistant in Nursing, Supervisor, Nurses' 

Infirmary. 
Diploma in Nursing, Presbvterian Hospital, New York, New York, 
1920. 

Inez Gnau, R.N., Assistant in Nursing, Supervisor, Psychiatric Nursing 

Service. 
Diploma in Nursing, Jefferson Hospital School of Nursing, Phila- 
delphia, Pennsylvania, 1935- 

Lilian Mead Henderson, R.N., Assistant in Nursing, Supervisor, Medi- 
cal and Surgical Nursing Service. 
Diploma in Nursing, Svracuse University School of Nursing, Syracuse, 
New York, 1930. 

Lucy Macdonald Hickey, R.N., Assistant in Nursing, Assistant Super- 
visor, General Operating Rooms. 
Diploma in Nursing, The New York Hospital School of Nursing, New 
York, New York, 1927. 

Margaret Kelly, R.N., Assistant in Nursing, Supervisor, Pediatric 

Nursing Service. 
Diploma in Nursing, The Troy Hospital, Troy, New York, 1921. 

Enid Kircaldie, R.N., Assistant in Nursing, Supervisor, Psychiatric 

Nursing Service. 
Diploma in Nursing, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, New 
York, New York, 1931. 

Marie A. Lalime, R.N., Assistant in Nursing, Supervisor, Medical and 

Surgical Nursing Service. 
Diploma in Nursing, Misericordia Hospital School of Nursing, New 
York, New York, 1926. 

Florence J. Meigs, R.N., Assistant in Nursing, Supervisor, Pediatric 

Nursing Service. 
Diploma in Nursing, Metropolitan Hospital School of Nursing, New 
York, New York, 1932. 

Helen V. Miller, R.N., Assistant in Nursing, Supervisor, Private 

Patients Nursing Service. 
Diploma in Nursing, The Long Island College Hospital School of Nurs- 
ing, Brooklyn, New York, 1932. 

[45] 



Dorothy H. Morrison, B.S., R.N., Assistant in Nursing, Assistant 

Supervisor, General Operating Rooms. 
Diploma in Nursing, The New York Hospital School of Nursing, New 
York, New York, 1938; B.S. in Nursing Education, Temple University, 
1939. 

Adelle Sawyer, Assistant in Physical Education. 

Diploma, Bouve Boston School of Physical Education, Boston, Massa- 
chusetts, 1942. 

Dorothy Vernstrom, B.S., R.N., Assistant in Nursing, Supervisor, 

Medical and Surgical Nursing Service. 
Diploma in Nursing, Truesdale Hospital School of Nursing, Fall River, 
Massachusetts, 1930; B.S., Teachers College, Columbia University, 
1941. 

Jeanette Walters, R.N., Assistant in Nursing, Supervisor, Obstetric and 

Gynecological Nursing Service. 
Diploma in Nursing, Temple University Hospital School of Nursing, 

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 1923. 

Ruth Woodfall, R.N., Assistant in Nursing, Supervisor, Pediatric Nurs- 
ing Service. 
Diploma in Nursing, The Children's Hospital School of Nursing, 
Boston, Massachusetts, 1932. 

Genevieve Jarosz Young, B.A., Assistant in Sciences. 
B.A., Hunter College, 1939. 



[46] 



MEMBERS OF THE FACULTY OF CORNELL 

UNIVERSITY MEDICAL COLLEGE WHO 

ARE ALSO MEMBERS OF THE 

FACULTY OF THE SCHOOL 

OF NURSING 

Joseph C. Hinsey, Ph. D Dean — Professor of Anatomy 

David P. Barr, M.D Professor of Medicine 

McKeen Cattell, M.D Professor of Pharmacology 

Oskar Diethelm. M.D Professor of Psychiatry 

Eugene F. DuBois, M.D Professor of Physiology 

Vincent Du Vigneaud, Ph. D Professor of Biochemistry 

George J. Heuer, M.D Professor of Surgery 

Samuel Z. Levine, M.D Professor of Pediatrics 

Wilson G. Smillie, M.D. , Professor of Public Health and Preventive Medicine 
Henricus J. Stander, M.D. . . . Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology 

LECTURERS 

Joseph P. Chandler, Ph.D Chemistry 

Assistant Professor of Biochemistry, 

Cornell University Medical College 
Edwin J. Doty, M.D Personality Study 

Assistant Professor of Psychiatry, 

Cornell University Medical College 
Warner S. Hammond, Ph.D Anatomy 

Instructor in Anatomy, Cornell University Medical College 
W. R. Redden, M.D Emergency Nursing 

American Red Cross, New York Chapter 
Ralph G. Stillman, M.D Microbiology 

Assistant Professor of Medicine (Clinical Pathology), 

Cornell University Medical College 
Elizabeth L. Watson, M.A., The New York Hospital . Microbiology 
Mary T. Whitley, Ph.D Child Psychology 

Professor of Psychology, Columbia University 
Chester L. Yntema, Ph.D Anatomy 

Assistant Professor of Anatomy, 

Cornell University Medical College 

HEALTH SERVICE 

Marian Tyndall, M.D., Edwin Doty, M.D., 

Physician in Chief Consulting Psychiatrist 

[47] 



MEMBERS OF OTHER DEPARTMENTS AND 
ORGANIZATIONS PARTICIPATING IN 

THE NURSING PROGRAM 



NUTRITION DEPARTMENT 

Margaret Gillam, M.A., Director Susan N. Paige, B.S. 

Barbara Correll, B.S. Betty Richmond, B.S. 

Marie Krause, M.S. Marjorie Skinner, B.S. 

Erva Livingston, B.S. Ruth Wayre, B.S. 



OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY DEPARTMENT, 
PAYNE WHITNEY CLINIC 



Elizabeth Spargo, Director 



PHYSICAL THERAPY DEPARTMENT, 
PAYNE WHITNEY CLINIC 

Grace Brindle, Director 



SOCIAL SERVICE DEPARTMENTS 

Theodate H. Soule, M.A., Director, Main Hospital 
Mrs. Virginia T. Kinzel, Director y Woman s Clinic 
Mrs. Melly Simon, Director, Payne Whitney Clinic 



HENRY STREET VISITING NURSE SERVICE 
Leah M. Blaisdell, B.S., R.N., Acting Director 

COMMUNITY SERVICE SOCIETY 

Department of Educational Nursing 
Alta E. Dines, M.A., L.H.D., R.N., Director 

[48] 



THE SOCIETY OF THE NEW YORK HOSPITAL 

Langdon P. Marvin President, Board of Governors 

James W. Husted Secretary , Board of Governors 

Murray Sargent Administrator-in-Chief 

NURSING SERVICE 

STAFF OF ADMINISTRATION 

Bessie A. R. Parker Acting Dean, School of 'Nursing 

Acting Director, Nursing Service 

Charlotte S. Argabrite Night Administrative Assistant 

Cora E. Kay Evening Administrative Assistant 

Sarah E. Moore Day Administrative Assistant 

See Faculty for Heads of Clinical Nursing Services 

ASSISTANTS IN ADMINISTRATION 
Frances Walker, Secretary Margaret Yogel, Secretary 

NURSING SERVICE COMMITTEE 

Bessie A. R. Parker, Chairman Alice M. Moffatt 

Charlotte S. Argabrite Sarah E. Moore 

Yerda F. Hickcox Olive M. Reid 

Cora E. Kay Agnes Schubert 

May Kennedy Carolyne A. Sprogell 

Veronica Lyons Thelma Stone 

SUPERVISORS 

Madeleine O'Brien, Private Patients Service 
(Other Supervisors listed under Faculty) 



HEAD NURSES 



Medical 

Ruth Brockman 
Alice Bullivant 
Mary Capuano 
Elizabeth Curtin 
Leone Delelys 
Barbara Derr 
Doris Dieterle 
Janet Dempsey Dunn 
Antoinette Fedorowicz 
Sara Gericke 
Anne Gruen 

EsTELLE LUBA 



and Surgical Services 

Mary McNeer 

Elizabeth Fairclough Murphy 

Edith Nielson 

Emily Piotrowski 

Hazel Poole 

Agnes Rafferty 

Stella Smariga 

Edna Stratton 

Dorothy Strunk 

Doris Sweeney 

Arlene Webster 

Katherine Zorn 

[49] 



Out-Patient Service 



Beatrice Brooks 
Evelyn Clark 
Virginia Codington 
Katherine Drucklieb 
Elsie Fiege 
Elizabeth Geiger 
Jean Haseltine 

WlLETTA HAYNES 

Lucille Lambert 



Evelyn Liddle 
Marjorie Liu 
Elsa Nussbaumer 
Dorothy Parkhill 
Celia Pehr 
Eva Poor 

Margaret Rouchleau 
Elizabeth Talbot 
luella uhrhane 



Stella Copley 
Gertrude Goodman 
Elizabeth Hilliard 
Doris Jacobson 
Grace Lundgren 



Payne Whitney Psychiatric Clinic 

Beatrice McKee 
Jessie Weaver 



Mary Goforth Whitaker 
Arlene Wilson 
Faye Wise 



Frances Irvine 
Ola Macpherson 



Pediatric Service 



Lois Schouten 
Edith Weaver 



Private and Semi-Private Services 



Lois Cautrell 
Faye Dumphy 
Lydia Hansen 
Grace Coates Kurtz 



Ane Nielsen 
Dorothy Shafer 
Lois Tait 
Barbara Walsh 



Woman s Clinic 



Alma Bott 
Elizabeth Calder 
Florence Campbell 
Agnes Connor 
Marcia Cronin 
Florence Gemski 
Violet Knox 
Esther Lipsheez 



Christine MacAdam 

Rose Novak 

Selma Buchdahl Nurick 

Esther Sorber 

Rose Valpreda 

Lucille White 

Louise Woermbke 



[50] 




ON THE WAY TO HOSPITAL 



CORNELL UNIVERSITY OFFICIAL PUBLICATION 
VOLUME 36 : AUGUST 1, 1944 : NUMBER 3 



Announcement of 
Cornell University-New York Hospital 

School of Nursing 

for 1944-45 




525 EAST 68th STREET, NEW YORK 21, N. Y. 



Requests for further information should be ad- 
dressed to the Dean, Cornell University-New York 
Hospital School of Nursing, 525 East 68th Street, 
New York 21, N. Y. 

An application form will be sent upon request 
to prospective students able to satisfy the re- 
quirements for admission. 



CORNELL UNIVERSITY OFFICIAL PUBLICATION 
VOLUME 36 AUGUST 1, 1944 : NUMBER 3 



Announcement of 
Cornell University- New York Hospital 

School of Nursing 

for 1944-45 




525 EAST 68th STREET, NEW YORK 21, N. Y 



CORNELL UNIVERSITY OFFICIAL PUBLICATION 

PUBLISHED BY CORNELL UNIVERSITY AT ITHACA, N. Y. 

Monthly in September, October, and November 
Semi-monthly, December to August inclusive 

[Entered as second-class matter, December 14, 1916, at the post office at 
Ithaca, New York, under the act of August 24, 1912] 



INDEX 

PAGE 

Administrative Policies 14 

Admissions Requirements 9 

Advanced Standing 13 

Aims of the School 9 

Calendar 5 

Citizenship 16 

Curriculum 11-23 

Degree and Diploma 14 

Extracurricular Opportunities 20 

Facilities of the School 9 

Faculty 39 

Fees 18 

Health Service 19 

History of the School 

Loan Funds 20 

Maintenance and General Expenses 19 

Registration of the School 8 

Registration and Orientation of New Students 11 

Scholarship Requirements 12 

School Government 21 

State Registration of Graduates 16 

U. S. Cadet Nurse Corps 13 

Vacations and Other Absences 20 




THE NEW YORK HOSPITAL, SOUTH VIEW 



CALENDAR 



1944 




Sept 


26 


Tuesday 


Sept. 


30 


Saturday 


Oct. 


2 


Monday 


Oct. 


12 


Thursday 


Nov 


23 


Thursday 


Dec. 


25 


Monday 


1945 




Jan. 


1 


Mondav 


Jan. 


13 


Saturday 


Jan. 


21 


Sunday 


Jan. 


22 


Monday 


Feb. 


12 


Monday 


Feb. 


22 


Thursday 


Feb. 


26 


Monday 


May 


13 


Sunday 


May 


14 


Monday 


May 30 


Wednesday 


July 


4 


Wednesday 


Julv 


14 


Saturday 


Sept. 


3 


Monday 


Sept. 


25 


Tuesday 


Sept. 


29 


Saturday 


Oct. 


1 


Monday 


Oct. 


12 


Friday 


Nov 


22 


Thursdav 


Dec. 


25 


Tuesdav 



Commencement 

Registration day (First-year students, Fall class) 

First term begins 
Thursdav Columbus Day — No classes except for pre- 
clinical students 
Thursdav Thanksgiving Day — No classes 

Christmas Dav — No classes 



New Year's Day — No classes 

Last day for filing applications for February 
class 

First term ends 

Second term begins 

Lincoln's Birthday — No classes 

Washington's Birthday — No classes 

Registration Day (First year students, Spring 
class) 

Second term ends 

Third term begins 

Decoration Day — No classes 

Independence Day — No classes 

Last day for filing applications for September 
class 

Labor Day — No classes 

Commencement 

Registration Day (First year students, Fall class) 

First term begins 

Columbus Day — No classes except for pre- 
clinical students 

Thanksgiving Day — No classes 

Christmas Dav — No classes 



Term dates apply to September admissions. Adjustments necessary 
for Februarv sections. 




LOBBY OF XURSES RESIDENCE 



GENERAL STATEMENT 



H 



I STORY 



CORNELL University-New York Hospital School of 
Nursing has the resources of two great institutions of 
learning, both of which have a long history and an envia- 
ble record of achievement in the fields of education and 
public welfare. 

Cornell University received its first endowment from the 
Federal Government's Educational Land Grant of 1862. 
The appropriation under the Morrill Act was to endow a 
college "where the leading object shall be . . .to teach 
such branches of learning as are related to agriculture and 
the mechanical arts. ' ' This was the beginning of a remark- 
able system of higher education. It, however, received its 
greatest impetus through the vision and generosity of Ezra 
Cornell who, under the influence of Andrew D. White, his 
colleague and later the first president, determined the form 
of the new University. In 1864 an agreement was reached 
with the Legislature of New York State which resulted in 
the founding of "a University of a new type, ... an insti- 
tution where any person can find instruction in any study. 
This combination of Federal, State, and private interests 
and resources is unique. It gives strength to the organiza- 
tion, broadens the aims and policies of the University, and 
extends the influence of its educational ideals. 

It is interesting to note how one school after another has 
been organized and made a unit of this educational system, 
the most recent of which is the School of Nursing which 
was added in July, 1942. 

The school, known until recently as The New York Hos- 
pital School of Nursing, was organized in 1877 as an inte- 
gral part of The New York Hospital, the second oldest 
hospital in America maintained by private endowment. 
George the Third of England granted the hospital its 

[7] 



charter of incorporation on June 13, 1771, under the title 
of the Society of the Hospital in the City of New York in 
America. In 1810 the title was changed to The Society of 
the New York Hospital by an Act of the New York 
Legislature. 

This hospital has the distinction of being the first insti- 
tution in America devoted to the care of the sick to give 
organized instruction to its nursing personnel. It was in 
1799 that Doctor Valentine Seaman, a scholarly man and 
prominent physician, organized a series of lectures com- 
bined with a course of practical instruction in the wards. 
This cannot be considered the beginning of the school, but 
it certainly formed the groundwork. 

In June, 1927, The New York Hospital completed an 
association with Cornell University Medical College. Five 
years later they moved to their present location on York 
Avenue, between sixty-eighth and seventy-first streets. 
The increased facilities thus made available contributed to 
the progressive development of the school of nursing and 
it seemed only a natural consequence that on its sixty-fifth 
anniversary it became a unit in a great university. 

The school is justly proud of its sixteen hundred gradu- 
ates among whom are many who have nation-wide recog- 
nition for their outstanding contributions in the various 
fields of nursing. 

Registration of the School 

The School of Nursing is registered by the Regents of the 
University of the State of New York and its graduates are 
eligible to take the state board examinations for license as 
registered professional nurses. 

The school is accredited by the National League of Nurs- 
ing Education which functions as the Department of Edu- 
cation of the American Nurses' Association. 

The hospital is approved by the American College of 
Surgeons and is a member of the American Hospital Asso- 
ciation. It is also approved for internships by the American 
Medical Association. 

[8] 



Aims of the School of Nursing 

Nursing offers a challenge to young women of excep- 
tional personal and professional qualifications who are 
interested in social welfare. The aim of Cornell University- 
New York Hospital School of Nursing is to prepare care- 
fully selected students in the fundamental principles of 
nursing and their practical application to the various 
clinical aspects of patient care in the hospital, in the home, 
and in other community service. Emphasis is placed on 
health teaching throughout the entire course. The develop- 
ment of the individual student as a responsible member of 
civic and social life is a significant outcome of the program. 

Facilities for the School 

A special building for the School of Nursing is adjacent 
to the hospital buildings. It provides adequate and well 
equipped class-rooms, laboratories, library, and recreation 
rooms as well as attractive and comfortable living accom- 
modations for students and faculty. 

Further necessary laboratory and library facilities are 
available through association with the Cornell University 
Medical College. 

The clinical facilities of The New York Hospital are un- 
surpassed for the care and study of patients. The hospital 
with a capacity of over one thousand beds admits all types 
of patients including medical, surgical, obstetric, gyne- 
cological, pediatric, and psychiatric. The out-patient de- 
partment provides ample opportunity for the study of 
ambulatory patients. 

Close cooperation with the Visiting Nurse Service of 
New York and other community agencies affords oppor- 
tunities for observation in a community nursing program. 

The social service department of The New York Hospital 
participates in the nursing course through the integration 
of social service in the program of study. 

Requirements for Admission 

A qualifying certificate from the Board of Regents of the 
State of New York is necessary for admission. The form 

[9] 



for requesting this certificate will be sent an applicant 
from the office of the Dean of the School of Nursing after 
application for admission to the school has been filed. 

Requirements for admission include the satisfactory com- 
pletion of two years of work in an accredited college. Stu- 
dents of unusual merit and promise who have less than the 
above requirements may be given special consideration. 

The following units of study in an accredited high school 
or a recognized preparatory school are required : 

English, Four years 3 units 

History 1 unit 

Civics yi unit 

Mathematics 2 units 

Algebra 1 unit 

Plane geometry 1 unit 

Science 2 units 

General science or biology. . . 1 unit 

Chemistry 1 unit 

Foreign language, Three years of one 
language or two years of each of two 

languages 3 or 4 units 

Electives (According to the amount of 

foreign language offered) 3j^ or lyi units 

Total 15 units 

It is recommended that prospective students include in 
their college program basic courses in general chemistry or 
inorganic and organic chemistry, zoology or biology, and 
the social sciences including psychology. Emphasis is 
placed upon scholarship of applicants. All students should 
review arithmetic prior to admission. 

Besides these scholastic admission requirements appli- 
cants should be at least eighteen and not over thirty years 
of age and must present evidence of physical and personal 
fitness for nursing. 

It is desirable that the applicant and her parent or 
guardian arrange for an interview with the Dean of the 
School of Nursing after formal application has been sub- 
mitted. An appointment will be made upon request. 

[10] 



At their own expense applicants must also present a 
report from the Nurse Testing Division for Schools of 
Nursing of the Psychological Corporation. Upon applica- 
tion to Cornell University-New York Hospital School of 
Nursing the card of application for admission to this 
examination will be forwarded to the applicant with 
necessary instructions. 

The Admissions Committee takes into account all in- 
formation received from these various sources in judging 
the suitability of an individual for admission to the school 
of nursing. 

An applicant must deposit $25.00 upon notification of 
acceptance for admission to the school. This deposit is 
credited toward fees payable on registration day but is not 
refundable if the applicant withdraws before that date. 

All applications for admission should be addressed to 
the Dean, Cornell University-New York Hospital School 
of Nursing, 525 East Sixty-eighth Street, New York 21, 
New York. 

(See ' 'Calendar ' for admission dates and last days for filing 
applications.) 

Registration and Orientation 
First year students must be at the school not later than 
10:00 a.m. on registration day. (See "Calendar" for exact 
date.) 

A brief orientation program precedes formal instruction. 
During this time students have necessary physical exami- 
nations with Schick, Dick, and Mantoux tests, are 
measured for uniforms, and procure books and other 
equipment. 

The Curriculum 

The three-year curriculum of the school of nursing is so 
planned as to give each student a thorough understanding 
of the basic sciences and principles underlying good nurs- 
ing and of the best methods to use in the care of the sick, 
in the prevention of disease, and in health education. 

The first and second years are divided into three terms 
each. The third year is divided into six terms and all formal 

[11] 



teaching is completed in the first three terms. The last 
three terms are assigned to supervised practice in con- 
formity with the requirements of the United States Public 
Health Service for those schools participating in the U. S. 
Cadet Nurse Corps program. 

During the first term and a half of the first year limited 
nursing practice is given in the pavilions of the hospital 
and the clinics of the out-patient department while a 
greater amount of time is spent in class and laboratory. 
In subsequent terms the student's nursing practice increases 
in length of time and in responsibility. A sequence is 
planned to include the various types of clinical services 
during day, evening, and night periods. An introduction 
to community nursing is provided in order that the 
student may acquire a more complete understanding of 
patients' needs. 

During the clinical terms each student is scheduled forty- 
eight hours a week, which includes all class and nursing 
practice assignments. 

Scholarship Requirements for Promotion 
and Graduation 

The established system of grading is the literal scale of 
F to A, with D as the lowest passing grade. 

An average of C for a given term is required for pro- 
motion without condition. A grade of C is required in the 
course Introduction to Nursing Arts, and a grade of B in the 
course Drugs and Solutions. A grade below C in any clinical 
field of nursing practice or a term average which is less 
than C places a student on major warning. This must be 
removed by the end of the next term to insure further 
promotion. A student on major warning is ineligible to 
hold office in student organizations. 

A grade of incomplete (I) is assigned if the work of a 
course is not completed because of illness or unavoidable 
absence and if, in the judgment of the instructor, the stu- 
dent has shown evidence that she can complete the course 
satisfactorily in a reasonable length of time. 

A failure (F) in any given subject may necessitate with- 

[12] 



drawal from the school unless the student's scholarship 
is exceptional in other respects, in which case repetition of 
the course may be recommended by the instructor. 

A cumulative average of C for three years' work is re- 
quired for graduation. 

Advanced Standing 

An applicant who has received her baccalaureate degree 
may have her time in the school reduced by two to six 
months if she maintains an average of B in theory and in 
practice throughout the course. Exemption must be re- 
quested during the last term of the second year. 

United States Cadet Nurse Corps 

The United States Cadet Nurse Corps has been organized 
in an effort to meet the critical shortage in nursing services 
caused by the war emergency. A unit of the Corps has 
been established in the school of nursing. Membership is 
voluntary and open to any student who is willing to agree 
to serve in military, governmental, or essential civilian 
nursing service until the end of hostilities. 

Applicants who wash to be enrolled in the Cadet Nurse 
Corps must meet the same admission requirements as other 
applicants. After registering in the school they have the 
same rights and privileges as other students and must meet 
the same requirements for promotion. Upon graduation, 
they are eligible for State licensure. 

Required fees and expenses will be paid through Federal 
funds for all students joining the Corps at least ninety 
days before the war ends. Their maintenance will be paid 
for the first nine months. Thereafter maintenance is pro- 
vided by the school. Corps members will receive Federal 
stipends at the rate of $15-00 per month during the first 
nine months and $20.00 per month from the tenth through 
the thirtieth month. From the thirty-first through the 
thirtv-sixth month the hospital agrees to pav a stipend 
of $30.00 per month. 

Attractive outdoor uniforms are provided and a dis- 
tinctive insignia will be worn on the indoor uniform. 

[13] 



Members of the Cadet Corps who withdraw from the 
school, either voluntarily or upon advice of the faculty, 
must return membership card, all distinctive Corps in- 
signia, and all textbooks and indoor uniform accessories 
provided through Federal funds. If in the school less than 
nine months at the time of withdrawal, all outdoor 
uniforms must be returned. 

General Administrative Policies 

Cornell University-New York Hospital School of Nurs- 
ing reserves the privilege of retaining in the school only 
those students who in the judgment of its faculty satisfy 
the requirements of scholarship, health, and personal 
suitability for the nursing profession. 

It also reserves the prerogative of changing its curricu- 
lum, educational policies, and fees as deemed necessary 
for the progressive development of the school. 

Degree and Diploma 

All students will receive a diploma in nursing from the 
Society of the New York Hospital upon satisfactory com- 
pletion of the course. Those students who enter the school 
with at least two years of college work acceptable to 
Cornell University will be granted in addition the degree 
of Bachelor of Science in Nursing from the University. 



[14 




STUDENT CARES FOR CONVALESCENT PATIENT IN SOLARIUM 




CONVALESCENT CHILDREN RECEIVE DIRECTION IN PLAY 



State Registration and Citizenship Requirements 

Students who satisfactorily complete the course are 
eligible for admission to the examination for license as a 
registered professional nurse in New York State if they 
submit evidence of citizenship in the United States or have 
declared intention of becoming a citizen. If citizenship is 
not completed within seven years from the date of the 
declaration of intention, State licensure is revoked. This 
ruling is in accordance with the law of New York State. 



[16 




THE GREEN DINING ROOM 




STUDY IN THE LIBRARY 



Fees 

First Year 

Matriculation Fee $11.00 

Administration Fee 20.00 

Tuition Fee 100.00 

Payable at registration $75-00 

Payable at beginning of second 

term, first year 25.00 

Laboratory Fee 25.00 

Chemistry Breakage (refundable if not 

used) 5-00 

Library Fee 2.00 

Health Service Fee 10.00 

$173.00 

Second Year 

Tuition Fee $50.00 

Library Fee 1.50 

Health Service Fee 500 

56.50 

Third Year 

Tuition Fee $50.00 

Library Fee 1.50 

Health Service Fee 500 

Graduation Fee 15 00 

Payable at beginning of fifth term, third 
year. Refundable if student is not gradu- 
ated. 

Degree Fee 500 

76.50 

Grand Total $306.00 

In addition to these fees students pay an annual Student 
Activity Fee of $5-25 which is collected by the class 
treasurer. 

[18] 






Maintenance and General Expenses 

The School of Nursing provides maintenance and limited 
gratuitous care in case of illness. Each student is furnished 
with uniforms and caps which remain the property of the 
school. 

The following estimated expenses must be met by the 
student: 

1st yr. 
1st term 2nd yr. 3rd yr. Optional 

Uniform aprons, bibs, and 

accessories $26.50 $3-00 

Uniform shoes 8.60 8.60 

Uniform sweater 4. 25 

Uniform cape $15-00 

Gymnasium suits 10.00 

Books, keys, bandage scis- 
sors, and miscellaneous 
supplies 30.00 S5-00 5-00 10.00 

Rental laboratory coat .. . 1.00 

Rental Public Health uni- 
forms 1.50 

Expenses for Public Health 

and other observations. . 2.00 20.00 2 00 



$82.35 $26.50 $18.60 $25.00 

None of the aforementioned articles should be purchased 
before admission to the school. Students should be pro- 
vided with an allowance for other personal needs deter- 
mined by individual requirements. A list of limited neces- 
sary personal equipment will be sent each prospective stu- 
dent when accepted for admission. For the three-year 
course the total cost to the student should not exceed four 
hundred fifty dollars in addition to personal expenditures 
as determined by the student. 

Health Regulations and Service 

The school of nursing maintains a health service for its 
students. A well equipped infirmary with necessary staff is 

[19] 



provided in the nurses* residence. A physical examination 
by the school physician with chest x-rays is required upon 
admission to the school and subsequent annual physical 
examinations will be given. 

Vaccinations against typhoid fever and smallpox will be 
required of all students before admission to the school. 
Schick and Dick tests and immunization for positive reac- 
tion to the Schick test will be required of all students 
after admission to the school. Mantoux tests will be 
given during the pre-clinical period and for those who 
are negative will be repeated at regular intervals. 

Gratuitous infirmary care for minor illnesses will be 
limited to four weeks at any one time in the case of all stu- 
dents. For more serious illnesses students will be cared for 
gratuitously in the hospital for not more than two weeks 
at any one time for the first-year students, and not more 
than four weeks at any one time for second and third year 
students. Expenses for special nursing care and special 
therapies must be borne by the student or her family. 

Vacations and Other Absences 

A vacation of four weeks is given in each of the first 
two years and two weeks in the third year. Students who 
have an exemption of time are not granted a vacation in the 
third year. All vacations are arranged to conform to the 
requirements of the educational program. 

As a result of absences the repetition of a course of study 
or special examinations may be required, class registration 
may be changed, and in necessary instances nursing practice 
will have to be made up. 

Loan Funds 

Student loan funds have been established for those who 
need financial aid and show promise in nursing. Appli- 
cation should be made in writing to the Dean of the School. 

Extracurricular Opportunities 

Believing that the education of young women today 
must include activities relating to healthful social rela- 

[20] 



tionships, generous provision for this development in the 
life of the student has been made. 

The beautiful fireproof, sixteen-story residence, erected 
adjacent to the hospital buildings, is the center for these 
activities. Every effort has been made in its construction 
and equipment to provide for the normal and healthy life 
of students and faculty. 

Each of the eight student residence floors contains at- 
tractively furnished single bedrooms with lavatories, 
ample common baths, showers, and toilet facilities, a com- 
mon sitting-room with adjoining kitchenette for informal 
gatherings, and a laundryette. The increased enrollment 
incident to the war emergency has made it necessary to 
assign two students to some of the larger bedrooms. 

Comfortable lounges, reading, reception, and dining- 
rooms are on the first and ground floors. 

For further recreational activities, a large, well equipped 
gymnasium, game-rooms, tennis courts, and porches are 
available. Arrangements for the use of an indoor swimming 
pool are made. 

To insure the full benefit and proper use of these facilities, 
well-qualified instructors are appointed to direct the social 
and recreational activities of the school. 

School Government 

The School of Nursing has a cooperative government in 
which the students take an active part. A student organi- 
zation has been established and functions with the Faculty 
Committee on Student Affairs in all matters relating to 
social and professional conduct and discipline. 

An annual student activities fee of $5-25 is required and 
collected by each class. 



[21 
















A STUDENT ROOM 




SUNDAY MORNING BREAKFAST IN THE FLOOR SITTING ROOM 



THE CURRICULUM 



First Year 








Class and 
Labora- 


Approx- 
imate 




tory 


Hours 




Hours 


Practice 



(Orientation — 28 hours, includes Personal 
Hygiene — 8 hours, and Personality Study 

— 6 hours) 28 

Anatomy 60 

Chemistry 55 

Microbiology 68 

Physiology 48 

History of Nursing 24 

Elementary Psychology 30 

Psychology of Deviate Behavior 15 

Introduction to Nursing Arts 118 300 

Professional Adjustments 1 15 

Nutrition and Cookery 30 

Diet Therapy 30 

Social and Economic Aspects of Health and 

Disease 30 

Pharmacology and Therapeutics 30 

Medicine 30 

Communicable Diseases 22 

Medical Nursing 30 480 

Surgery 59 

Surgical Nursing 30 480 

Totals 732 1260 



[23 



Second Year 

Class and Approx- 
Labora- imate 
tory Hours 

Hours Practice 

Medical Nursing 192 

Diet Therapy Practice 192 

Operative Technique 15 359 

Pediatrics 30 

Pediatric Nursing 30 698 

Obstetrics and Gynecology 30 

Obstetric and Gynecological Nursing 30 698 

Includes 48 hours observation in the 
Public Health Field 
Development of Behavior in Children 30 

Totals 165 2139 

Third Year 
(Accelerated program) 
First half of year 

Medical Nursing 8 172 

Surgical Nursing 8 172 

Emergency Nursing 22 

Professional Adjustments II 15 

Psychiatry 30 

Psychiatric Nursing 30 316 

Family and Community Health 20 

Out-Patient Nursing 356 

Includes 48 hours in Nutrition Clinic 
Second half of year 

Medical Nursing 240 

Surgical Nursing 240 

Psychiatric Nursing 384 

Private Patients Nursing 192 

Out-Patient Nursing 192 

Totals 133 2264 

Grand Total Hours 1030 5663 

Two or more hours a week of bedside instruction and individual 
conferences, which approximate a total of 244 hours, are included in 
practice assignments. 

For Physical Education see Description of Courses. 

[24] 



DESCRIPTION OF COURSES 

Preclinical Sciences 

100. Anatomy 

This course includes both gross and microscopical 
anatomy. The gross anatomy is taught by lectures, demon- 
strations, and student dissection of the cadaver. The 
microscopical work is directly correlated with the gross 
dissection and includes a detailed study of prepared slides. 
Significant embryological information is included in the 
lectures. 

60 Hours, First Year 

Dr. Hinsey, Dr. Yntema, Dr. Hammond 

101. Chemistry 

A course designed to acquaint students with the funda- 
mental principles of inorganic and physiological chemistry 
with special application to nursing practice. Studies in the 
general composition of the blood and urine, and in the 
digestion and utilization of foods are included. Lectures, 
recitations, demonstrations, and laboratory. 
55 Hours, First Year 
Dr. DuVigneaud, Miss Rynbergen T 
Dr. Chandler, Mrs. Lee, Mrs. Young 

102. Microbiology 

The study of the habits and morphology of microorgan- 
isms emphasizing those of pathogenic character; sources, 
modes, and prevention of infection; disinfection and asep- 
sis; the more important tissue changes occurring in the 
healing process, infections, and neoplasms; clinical micro- 
scopy of the blood and blood grouping; kidney function 
and urinalysis. Practical demonstrations and applications 
are made which relate directly to nursing. The blood group 
of each student is ascertained and recorded. Lectures, reci- 
tations, and laboratory. 

68 Hours, First Year 

Dr. Barr, Dr. Stillman, Miss Watsoa 

[25] 



103- Pharmacology and Therapeutics 

A course designed to acquaint the student with the fun- 
damental weights, measures, terms, and symbols used in 
the preparation and administration of drugs, common anti- 
septics, disinfectants, and other solutions. A study of im- 
portant and commonly used drugs, their preparation, dos- 
age, administration, physiological and therapeutic ac- 
tions, idiosyncrasies, cumulative and minor toxic symp- 
toms, antidotes and emergency treatments. Emphasis is 
placed on the accurate administration of drugs and the 
careful observation of their effects through supervised 
practice in nursing courses. 

30 Hours, First Year 
Dr. Cattell 
104. Physiology 

This course is designed to give a basic understanding of 
the functions of the normal human body as an essential 
prerequisite to the study of health and nutrition and the 
pathological changes due to disease. Lectures, recitations, 
demonstrations, and laboratory. 

48 Hours, First Year 

Dr. DuBois, Miss Rynbergen, 

Dr. McLeod, Dr. Miiller, Mrs. Young 

Medical Nursing 

110. Medicine 

Medical aspects of diseases are considered in these lec- 
tures and clinics. Material presented will supplement, em- 
phasize, and interpret required reading covering etiology, 
sources of infection, symptomatology, usual course pathol- 
ogy, complications, treatment, prognosis, and prevention. 

30 Hours, First Year 
Dr. Barr and staff 

111. Communicable Diseases 

A study of communicable diseases, including tuberculo- 
sis. Special emphasis is placed upon etiology, modes of 
transmission, and prevention. Lectures and clinics. 

22 Hours, First Year 
Dr. Barr and staff 

[26] 




NUTRITION AND COOKERY CLASS 




SURGICAL TECHNIQUE DEMONSTRATED TO FIRST-YEAR STUDENTS 



112. Principles of Medical Nursing Including Communi- 

cable Disease Nursing 
Through lectures, clinics, and demonstrations, students 
are taught principles and methods of nursing as applied to 
the care of medical patients. In the third year emphasis is 
placed upon managerial and teaching problems and the 
newer methods of treatment are presented. 
30 Hours, First Year 
8 Hours, Third Year 
Miss Lyons, Mrs. Crispell, Miss Fritz 

113. Practice of Medical Nursing Including Communicable 

Disease Nursing 
Supervised practice and study of the application of medi- 
cal nursing principles and methods to the care of patients 
on the medical pavilions of the hospital. In addition stu- 
dents study and practice medical aseptic nursing as related 
to the care of patients suffering from communicable dis- 
eases including tuberculosis. Practice includes care of pa- 
tients and managerial experience during day, evening, and 
night. Demonstrations and conferences. 

1084 Hours, First, Second, and Third Years 
(includes 384 hours of communicable disease nursing) 
Miss Lyons, Mrs. Crispell, Miss Fritz, Miss Hender- 
son, Miss Hills, Miss Nielsen and staff 

114. Practice in Care of Private Patients 
Application of principles of medical and surgical nursing 

to the care of private patients. 

192 Hours, Third Year 

Miss Moffatt, Mrs. Miller and staff 

Nursing 
120. Orientation 

This course is designed to give the beginning student a 
general conception of the field of nursing; the responsibili- 
ties and obligations of each individual in choosing the pro- 
fession; the importance of general conduct in building up 
the right habits of living and attitudes of the nurse. In- 

[28] 



eludes lectures in personal hygiene and personality study, 
emphasizing the importance of physical and mental health 
especially as it relates to the life of the nurse and is re- 
flected in her work. 

28 Hours, First Year 

Miss Parker, Miss Kennedy, Mrs. Overholser, 

Dr. Doty, Dr. Tyndall, Miss McDermott 

121. a. Introduction to Nursing Arts 

A course designed to give the student a basic understand- 
ing of the principles of nursing with emphasis upon her at- 
titude toward her patient, the existing social relationships, 
the physical requirements for the proper care of patients, 
and the procedures found most helpful for the promotion 
of health. Lectures and demonstrations. 

118 Hours, First Year 
Miss Stone 

121. b. Practice of Elementary Nursing 

Practice includes application of the theories of nursing 
in laboratory practice, in the surgical supply room, and in 
the actual care of convalescent patients in the pavilions and 
out-patient department of the hospital. 

300 Hours, First Year 

Miss Stone, Miss Farthing, Miss Zorn 

122. History of Nursing 

A survey of the historical development of nursing from 
its early conception to modern times. Lectures and panel 
discussions. 

24 Hours, First Year 
Mrs. Overholser 
123- Professional Adjustments I 

A general consideration of fundamental ethical and phil- 
osophical principles and their application to problems 
which arise in the practice of nursing. An attempt is made 
to coordinate this course closely with each course of nurs- 
ing practice through class discussions of pertinent prob- 
lems. Lectures and conferences. 

15 Hours, First Year 
Mrs. Overholser 

[29] 



124. Professional Adjustments II 

Through a general survey of the nursing field, the stu- 
dent has an opportunity to learn the trends and advances in 
the profession; the need and opportunities for specialized 
preparation; the importance and types of legislation; the 
activities of professional organizations and the obligations 
of their members. Lectures and conferences. 

15 Hours, Third Year 
Miss Parker and Special Lecturers 

125. Emergency Nursing 

This course supplements the instruction in nursing and 
deals with the application of these principles to emergency 
situations in the home and community. Lectures and 
demonstrations. First Aid certificate granted by American 
Red Cross. 

22 Hours, Third Year 
Dr. Redden 

See description of other courses in nursing relating to 
specific clinical fields. 

Nutrition 

130. Nutrition and Cookery 

An elementary course in normal adult nutrition and in 
food preparation. In addition, the nutrition requirements 
in childhood and in pregnancy are discussed during the 
student's practice on pediatric and obstetric services. 

30 Hours, First Year 
Miss Rynbergen, Mrs. Young 

131. Diet Therapy 

A course designed to present the underlying principles 
in treatment of disease by means of special dietaries; given 
concurrently with the lectures in Medical and Surgical 
Diseases. This course is supplemented by conference work 
during the student's practice on medical and surgical 
services. Lectures, recitations, and laboratory. 

30 Hours, First Year 
Miss Rynbergen, Mrs. Young 

[30] 




TENNIS IS A HEALTHFUL RECREATION 



132. Practice of Diet Therapy 

The application of the principles of diet therapy in super- 
vised practice on the pavilions in the hospital. Conferences 
and case studies. 

192 Hours, Second Year 

Miss Gillam, Miss Rynbergen, Mrs. Young, 

Miss Livingston, Miss Skinner 

Obstetrics and Gynecology 

140. Obstetrics and Gynecology 

This course deals with physiological and pathological 
changes during pregnancy, labor, and puerperium; the care 
of the normal newborn; the nutrition of the mother and 
baby; the prevention of complications; the social signifi- 
cance of infant and maternal mortality; the relation of 
obstetrics to various gynecological conditions; the results 
of infection and tumor growth and the required surgical 
interference and operative treatment. Lectures. 

30 Hours, Second Year 

Dr. Stander and staff 

Miss Rynbergen, Mrs. Young 

141. Principles of Obstetric and Gynecological Nursing 

This course emphasizes the importance of prenatal in- 
struction, observation, and care; infant, obstetric, and 
gynecological nursing procedure with particular attention 
to infections and their special therapy. Classes, demonstra- 
tions, and conferences. 

30 Hours, Second Year 
Miss Hickcox, Miss Boyle, Miss Walters, 
Miss Geuss, Miss Klein, Miss Rynbergen, 
Mrs. Young 

142. Practice of Obstetric and Gynecological Nursing 

Under supervised practice in the pavilions, nurseries, 
operating rooms, labor and delivery rooms, and out- 
patient department, students have the opportunity to 

[32] 



observe and care for infants and obstetric and gynecologi- 
cal patients. Nursing practice, case studies, and conferences. 

698 Hours, Second Year 

Miss Hickcox, Mrs. Bourgeois, Miss Geuss, 

Mrs. Hogan, Miss Klein, Miss Walters and 

staff 

Mrs. Overholser, Miss Boyle 

Pediatrics 

150. Pediatrics 

This course emphasizes the influence of social, economic, 
and medical contributions on normal growth and de- 
velopment. Through a study of representative diseases of 
infancy and childhood, the resulting effects on morbidity 
and mortality are shown. Lectures and clinics. 

30 Hours, Second Year 
Dr. Levine and staff 

151. Principles of Pediatric Nursing 

The basic principles in the care of well and sick infants 
and children are given together with the social, educa- 
tional, and nutritional aspects of their treatment and be- 
havior as normal children. Classes, conferences, and 
demonstrations. 

30 Hours, Second Year 

Miss Schubert, Mrs. Blatt, Miss Ferguson, Miss 

Rebentisch, Miss Woodfall and staff 

Miss Rynbergen, Mrs. Young 

152. Practice of Pediatric Nursing 

This consists of supervised experience in aseptic nursing 
methods in the care of infants and children in the pavilion, 
formula laboratory, premature nursery, and out-patient 
department. Case studies and conferences. 

698 Hours, Second Year 

Miss Schubert, Miss Ferguson, Miss Meigs, 

Miss Rebentisch, Miss Woodfall and staff 

Mrs. Blatt, Miss Correll 

[33] 



153- Development of Behavior in Children 

A study of the normal child and his behavior. The sus- 
ceptibility of the child's behavior responses to the various 
details of family life and of school will be emphasized. 
Lectures and recitations. 

30 Hours, Second Year 
Miss Whitley 

Personal Hygiene and Public Health 

Personal Hygiene 

(8 hours — Included in 120. Orientation.) 

160. Physical Education 

Each student will be required to participate in regular 
physical exercise. This program is designed primarily to 
maintain positive health with emphasis upon posture and 
corrective measures and to stimulate sportsmanship. 

64 Hours, Each Year 

Miss McDermott and Miss Sawyer 

161. Social and Economic Aspects of Health and Disease 

This course attempts to relate the care of the patient in 
the hospital to the home and the community situation. 
Discussion of the nurse's part in the prevention of illness 
and the promotion of health. Lectures and conferences. 

30 Hours, First Year 

Mrs. Overholser, Miss Soule 

162. Family and Community Health 

An introduction to the study of public health; local, 
state, and national services. In connection with field obser- 
vations a brief survey of public health nursing is given; 
its development, aims, opportunities, requirements, and 
preparation. Lectures. 

20 Hours, Third Year 

Dr. Smillie, Mrs. Overholser 

[34] 



163- Community Nursing Principles and Practice 

Nursing practice in the out-patient department; visits of 
observation to community agencies; contact with the 
home through the social service department and public 
health nursing agencies in the community. 
48 Hours, Second Year 

Observation, Visiting Nurse Service of New York 
548 Hours, Third Year 

Medical and Surgical Out-Patient Department 
Mrs. Overholser, Miss Reid, Miss Rolfe and staff 
Social Service Department, Miss Soule and staff 



Psychiatry 

170. Psychiatry 

A course of study designed to acquaint students with 
psychopathic conditions, their etiology, pathology, and 
treatment. Included in this course is an historical survey of 
psychiatry and the mental hygiene movement, a discussion 
of the problems most frequently found in the different 
periods of human development: nursery school age, pre- 
puberty, adolescent, climactic, and senile. An introduction 
to the techniques and social agencies available in helping 
people meet their problems. 

30 Hours, Third Year 
Dr. Diethelm and staff 

171. Principles of Psychiatric Nursing 

This course is organized to give students an understand- 
ing of the basic principles in the nursing care of personality 
disorders and the nursing procedures used in their treat- 
ment. Emphasis is placed also upon the relation of emotion- 
al disturbances to physical illness and of early development 
to future adult life. Lectures, demonstrations, and clinics. 

30 Hours, Third Year 

Miss Sprogell, Miss Corrigan, Miss Joinville, 

Miss Lewis, Miss Noble and staff 

[35] 



172. a. Practice of Psychiatric Nursing 

The application of the principles of psychiatric nursing 
through supervised practice in and conferences on the care 
of adults both in the in-patient and out-patient depart- 
ments. Behavior studies and case studies. Two eight-week 
periods. 

650 Hours, Third Year 

Miss SprogeJl, Miss Corrigan, Miss Gnau, Miss Joinville, 

Miss Lewis, Miss Noble and staff 

172. b. Special Therapeutics in Psychiatric Nursing 

An opportunity is given the student for observation and 
practice in hydrotherapy, occupational and recreational 
therapies, with special emphasis on needs of the individual 
patient. Conferences and supervised practice. 

50 Hours, Third Year, Second Period 
Miss Spargo, Miss Brindle 

Psychology 

180. Elementary Psychology 

An introduction to the study of human behavior and the 
underlying principles of mental adjustments and habit for- 
mation. An effort is made to apply this study to the stu- 
dent's own personality and give her a more scientific basis 
by which she can get a better understanding of the be- 
havior of herself, her co-workers, and her patients. 
Lectures and recitations. 

30 Hours, First Year 
Miss Kennedy 

181. Psychology of Deviate Behavior 

A study of the deviations in behavior of adults and 
children, due to organic and sociological factors, and of 
the nursing care necessary in assisting patients in making 
more adequate adjustments during illness. The principles 
of mental hygiene are emphasized. Lectures and recitations. 

15 Hours, First Year 
Miss Kennedy 

Development of Behavior in Children (See Pediatrics) 

[36] 



Surgical Nursing 
190. Surgery 

Surgical aspects of diseases are presented in these lectures 
and clinics. Factors determining the need for surgical 
interference are discussed and the major steps in the opera- 
tion outlined. Special emphasis is placed upon signs, 
symptoms, and observations which should be made both 
preceding and following operation. 

39 Hours, First Year 
Dr. Heuer and staff 



191- Principles of Surgical Nursing 

Through lectures and demonstrations students are taught 
the principles and methods of surgical asepsis aud the nurs- 
ing of surgical patients. In the third year emphasis is 
placed upon managerial aud teaching problems, and the 
newer methods of treatment are presented. 

30 Hours, First Year 
8 Hours, Third Year 
Miss Lyons, Miss Fedder, Miss Harmon, 
Miss Newton 



192. Practice of Surgical Nursing 

Supervised practice and study of the application of nurs- 
ing principles to the care of patients on surgical pavilions 
of the hospital. Practice includes care of patients and 
managerial experience during the day, evening, and night. 
Demonstrations and conferences. 

892 Hours, First and Third Years 

Miss Lyons, Miss Fedder, Miss Harmon, 

Miss Henderson, Miss Hills, 

Miss Newton, Miss Nielsen and staff" 

[37] 



193. Operative Technique 

This course is designed to give the student a thorough 
understanding of surgical aseptic technique. It is planned 
to develop dexterity and intelligent response in assisting 
with operations and in meeting surgical emergencies. 
Experience is given in the general operating room and 
the gynecological operating room. 

15 Hours, lectures, demonstrations, and conferences 

359 Hours, practice, Second Year 

Miss Lyons, Miss Haslup, Mrs. Gross and staff 




STUDY IN A CONFERENCE ROOM 



[38 



CORNELL UNIVERSITY-NEW YORK 
HOSPITAL SCHOOL OF NURSING 



STAFF OF ADMINISTRATION 

Edmund Ezra Day President of the University 

Bessie A. R. Parker Acting Dean 

May Kennedy Associate Director 

ASSISTANTS IN ADMINISTRATION 

Flora J. Bergstrom Librarian 

Alice Harriman Registrar 

Margaret Vogel Secretary 



EXECUTIVE FACULTY 



Edmund Ezra Day 
Verda F. Hickcox Margery T. Overholser 

Bessie A. R. Parker 
Olive M. Reid 
Agnes Schubert 
Carolyne A. Sprogell 
HenricusJ. Stander 



Joseph C. Hinsey 
May Kennedy 
Veronica Lyons 
Alice M. Moffatt 
Sarah E. Moore 



[39] 



STANDING COMMITTEES OF THE FACULTY 

Committee on Curriculum 
Bessie A. R. Parker, Chairman Samuel Levine 

OSKAR DlETHELM VERONICA LYONS 

George J. Heuer Margery Overholser 

Verda Hickcox Thelma Stone 

May Kennedy Chester L. Yntema 

Committee on Nursing Principles and Practice 

Thelma Stone, Chairman Catherine P. Geuss 

Helma Fedder Margaret Joinville 

Edna Fritz Daphne Rolfe 

Ruth E. Woodfall 

Committee on Admissions 

Mary Klein, Chairman Sarah E. Moore 

Elizabeth Harmon Thelma Stone 

Eugene F. Bradford, Director of Admissions, 
Cornell University, Member ex-officio 

Committees on Promotion 

FIRST YEAR STUDENTS 

Thelma Stone, Chairman Kathleen Newton 

Edna Fritz Adelle Sawyer 

Genevieve Young 

second year students 

Veronica Lyons, Chairman Jean Rebentisch 

Frances Boyle Henderika Rynbergen 

Martha Haslup Jeanette Walters 

third year students 

Carolyne A. Sprogell, Chairman Elizabeth Harmon 
Mabel Crispell Helen Miller 

Daphne Rolfe 

[40] 



Library Committee 
May Kennedy, Chairman Margery Overholser 

Flora J. Bergstrom Jean Rebentisch 

Mabel Crispell Olive M. Reid 

Kathleen Newton Henderika Rynbergen 

Genevieve Noble Jeanette Walters 

Committee on Records 
May Kennedy, Chairman Alice M. Moffatt 

Verda Hickcox Olive M. Reid 

Veronica Lyons Agnes Schubert 

Carolyne A. Sprogell 

Committee on Student and Staff Health 
Margery Overholser, Chairman Verda Hickcox 
Eleanor M. Corrigan Veronica Lyons 

Sarah Ferguson Helen Miller 

Rita Genner Olive M. Reid 

Marian Tyndall 

Committee on Scholarship Aid and Student Loan 
May Kennedy, Chairman Frances Farthing 

Agnes Schubert 

Committee on Affiliating Students 
Agnes Schubert, Chairman Burnett a Blatt 

Verda Hickcox 

Committee on Graduate Courses 
Verda Hickcox, Chairman Margery Overholser 

Veronica Lyons Olive M. Reid 

Carolyne A. Sprogell 

Committee on Student Affairs 
Catherine Geuss, Chairman Eleanor Lewis 
Edna Fritz Mary McDermott 

Henderika Rynbergen 

ALUMNAE COMMITTEE OF THE 
SCHOOL OF NURSING 
Mary Beard, Chairman 
Minnie H. Jordan Annie W. Goodrich, Vice Chairman 

[41] 



FACULTY 

Edmund Ezra Day, B.S., M.A., Ph.D., LL.D., 

President of the University 

Cornelius Betten, Ph.D., D.Sc, Dean of the University Faculty 

PROFESSORS 

Bessie A. R. Parker, B.S., R.N., Professor of Nursing, Acting Dean of the 

School of Nursing and Acting Director of the Nursing Service. 
Diploma in Nursing, Rhode Island Hospital Training School for Nurses, 
Providence, Rhode Island, 1918; B.S., Teachers College, Columbia 
University, 1937. 

May Kennedy, M.A., R.N., Professor of Nursing, Associate Director of 

the School of Nursing. 
Diploma in Nursing, St. Joseph's Hospital, Chicago, Illinois, 1907; 
B.S., Teachers College, Columbia University, 1917; M.A., University 
of Chicago, 1932. 

ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS 

Verda F. Hickcox, B.S., R.N., Associate Professor of Nursing, Head of 

Obstetric and Gynecological Nursing Service. 
Diploma in Nursing, Presbyterian Hospital School for Nurses, Chicago, 
Illinois, 1916; B.S., Teachers College, Columbia University, 1927. 

Margery T. Overholser, M.A., R.N., Associate Professor of Public 

Health Nursing. 
Diploma in Nursing, Wesley Memorial Hospital School of Nursing, 
Chicago, Illinois, 1922; B. S., Teachers College, Columbia University, 
1927; M.A., ibid, 1944. 

Olive M. Reid, A.B., R.N., Associate Professor of Nursing, Head of Out- 

Patient Nursing Service. 
A.B., Western College for Women, 1916; Diploma in Nursing, Army 
School of Nursing, Washington, D. C, 1921. 

Agnes Schubert, M.S., R.N., Associate Professor of Nursing, Head of 

Pediatric Nursing Service. 
B.S., Northwestern University, 1917; Diploma in Nursing, Western 
Reserve University School of Nursing, Cleveland, Ohio, 1926; M.S., 
Teachers College, Columbia University, 1932. 

Carolyne A. Sprogell, B.S., R.N., Associate Professor of Nursing, 

Director, Psychiatric Nursing Service. 
Diploma in Nursing, St. Lukes Hospital School of Nursing, New York, 
New York, 1924; B.S., Teachers College, Columbia University, 1936. 

[42] 



ASSISTANT PROFESSORS 

Eleanor M. Corrigan, B.S., R.N., Assistant Professor of Nursing, 

Administrative Assistant, Psychiatric Nursing Service. 
Diploma in Nursing, St. Lukes Hospital School of Nursing, New York, 
New York, 1927; B.S., Teachers College, Columbia University, 1940. 

Catherine P. Geuss, M.A., R.N., Assistant Professor of Nursing, Super- 
visor, Obstetric and Gynecological Nursing Service. 
Diploma in Nursing, Michael Reese Hospital School of Nursing, 
Chicago, Illinois, 1928; B.S., Teachers College, Columbia University, 
1932; M.A., ibid., 1942. 

Mary Elizabeth Klein, B.S., R.N., Assistant Professor of Nursing, 

Supervisor, Obstetric and Gynecological Nursing Service. 
Diploma in Nursing, Hahnemann Hospital School of Nursing, Phila- 
delphia, Pennsylvania, 1916; B.S., Teachers College, Columbia Uni- 
versity, 1936. 

Veronica Lyons, B.S., R.N., Assistant Professor of Nursing, Head of 

Medical and Surgical Nursing Service. 
Diploma in Nursing, The Johns Hopkins Hospital School for Nurses, 
1927; B.S., Teachers College, Columbia University, 1936. 

Mary T. McDermott, M.A., Assistant Professor of Physical Education, 

Director, Nurses' Re side nee. 
Diploma, Bouve Boston School of Physical Education, Boston, Massa- 
chusetts, 1916; B.S., New York University, 1930; M.A., ibid., 1932. 

Alice Maud Moffatt, R.N., Assistant Professor of Nursing, Head of 

Private Patients Nursing Service. 
Diploma in Nursing, The New York Hospital School of Nursing, New 
York, New York, 1912. 

Sarah E. Moore, R.N., Assistant Professor of Nursing, Administrative 

Assistant, Day Nursing Service. 
Diploma in Nursing, The New York Hospital School of Nursing, New 
York, New York, 1913- 

Henderika J. Rynbergen, M.S., Assistant Professor of Sciences. 
B.S., Simmons College, 1922; M.S., Cornell University Medical Col- 
lege, 1938. 

INSTRUCTORS 

Frances Lucretia Boyle, R.N., Instructor in Nursing, Supervisor, 

Obstetric Out-Patient Nursing Service. 
Diploma in Nursing, Moses Taylor Hospital, Scranton, Pennsvlvania, 
1924. 

[43] 



Mabel Story Crispell, B.S., R.N., Instructor in Nursing, Supervisor , 
Medical Nursing Service. 

Diploma in Nursing, Cornell University-New York Hospital School 
of Nursing, New York, New York, 1942; B.S. in Nursing, Cornell 
University, 1943. 

Helma Fedder, B.S., R.N., Instructor in Nursing, Supervisor, Surgical 
Nursing Service. 

Diploma in Nursing, Washington University School of Nursing, St. 
Louis, Missouri, 1933; B.S., University of Chicago, 1942. 

Sarah M. Ferguson, R.N., Instructor in Nursing, Supervisor, Pediatric 
Nursing Service. 

Diploma in Nursing, Children's Hospital School of Nursing, Boston, 
Massachusetts, 1932. 

Edna Fritz, M.A., R.N., Instructor in Nursing, Supervisor, Medical 

Nursing Service. 
Diploma in Nursing, Russell Sage College School of Nursing, Troy, 
New York, 1940; B.S., ibid., 1940; M.A., Teachers College, Columbia 
University, 1942. 

Elizabeth Harmon, B.A., R.N., Instructor in Nursing, Supervisor, 

Surgical Nursing Service. 
B.A., College of Wooster, 1928; Diploma in Nursing, Presbyterian 
Hospital School of Nursing, Chicago, Illinois, 1931. 

Martha Woodburn Haslup, R.N., Instructor in Nursing, Supervisor, 

General Operating Rooms. 
Diploma in Nursing, The Johns Hopkins Hospital School of Nursing, 

Baltimore, Maryland, 1929. 

Thirza Hills, B.S., R.N., Instructor in Nursing, Supervisor, Medical and 

Surgical Nursing Service. 
Diploma in Nursing, Presbyterian Hospital School for Nurses, Chicago, 
Illinois, 1925; B.S., Teachers College, Columbia University, 1942. 

Margaret Joinville, B.S., R.N., Instructor in Nursing, Supervisor, 

Psychiatric Nursing Service. 
Diploma in Nursing, The Army School of Nursing, Washington, D. C, 
1929; B.S., Teachers College, Columbia University, 1941. 

Eleanor Lewis, B.A., B.N., R.N., Instructor in Nursing, Supervisor, 

Psychiatric Out- Patient Nursing Service. 
B.A., Radcliffe College, 1925; B.N., Yale University School of Nursing, 
New Haven, Connecticut, 1928. 

[44] 



Kathleen Newton, B.S., R.N., Instructor in Nursing, Supervisor, Surgical 

Nursing Service. 
B.S. in General Sciences, University of Washington, 1934; Diploma in 
Nursing, ibid., 1936; B.S. in Nursing Education, ibid., 1936. 

Genevieve Noble, M.A., R.N., Instructor in Nursing, Supervisor, 

Psychiatric Nursing Service. 
B.A., Goucher College, 1932; M.A., Teachers College, Columbia Uni- 
versity, 1927; Diploma in Nursing, Presbyterian Hospital School of 
Nursing, New York, New York, 1938. 

Jean I. Rebentisch, M.A., R.N., Instructor in Nursing, Supervisor, Pedi- 
atric Nursing Service. 
Diploma in Nursing, Methodist Hospital School of Nursing, Brooklyn, 
New York, 1929; B.S., Teachers College, Columbia University, 1940., 
M.A., ibid, 1944. 

Daphne Rolfe, B.S., R.N., Instructor in Nursing, Supervisor, Out-Patient 

Nursing Service. 
Diploma in Nursing, The American Hospital of Paris, Paris, France, 
1933; B.S., Teachers College, Columbia University, 1940. 

Thelma L. Stone, B.S., R.N., Instructor in Nursing Arts. 

Diploma in Nursing, The New York Hospital School of Nursing, New 

York, New York, 1936; B.S., Simmons College, 1941. 

Jeanette Walters, B.S., R.N., Instructor in Nursing, Supervisor, 

Obstetric and Gynecological Nursing Service. 
Diploma in Nursing, Temple University Hospital School of Nursing, 
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 1923; B.S., New York University, 1944. 

One to be appointed. 

ASSISTANTS 

Burnetta Blatt, R.N., Assistant in Out-Patient Nursing, Supervisor, 

Pediatric Out- Patient Nursing Service. 
Diploma in Nursing, The New York Hospital School of Nursing, New 
York, New York, 1934. 

Marguerite Bourgeois, M.S., R.N., Assistant in Nursing, Supervisor, 

Obstetric and Gynecological Nursing Service. 
B.S., Massachusetts State College, 1931; Diploma in Nursing, Massa- 
chusetts General Hospital School of Nursing, Boston, Massachusetts. 
1936; M.S., Massachusetts State College, 1937. 

Frances Farthing, B.S., R.N., Assistant in Nursing Arts. 
B.S., Appalachian College, 1935; Diploma in Nursing, Cornell Uni- 
versity-New York Hospital School of Nursing, New York, New York, 
1942; B.S. in Nursing, Cornell University, 1943- 

[45] 



Rita Malloch Genner, R.N., Assistant in Nursing, Supervisor, Nurses' 

Infirmary. 
Diploma in Nursing, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, New 
York, New York, 1920. 

Inez Gnau, R.N., Assistant in Nursing, Supervisor, Psychiatric Nursing 

Service. 
Diploma in Nursing, Jefferson Hospital School of Nursing, Phila- 
delphia, Pennsylvania, 1935- 

Lilian Mead Henderson, R.N., Assistant in Nursing, Supervisor, Medi- 
cal and Surgical Nursing Service. 
Diploma in Nursing, Syracuse University School of Nursing, Syracuse, 
New York, 1930. 

Lucy Macdonald Hickey, R.N., Assistant in Nursing, Assistant Super- 
visor, General Operating Rooms. 
Diploma in Nursing, The New York Hospital School of Nursing, New 
York, New York, 1927. 

Sara Lapsley Hog an, R.N., Assistant in Nursing, Supervisor, Obstetric 
and Gynecological Nursing Service. 

Diploma in Nursing, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, New 

York, New York, 1931. 

Florence J. Meigs, R.N., Assistant in Nursing, Supervisor, Pediatric 
Nursing Service. 

Diploma in Nursing, Metropolitan Hospital School of Nursing, New 

York, New York, 1932. 

Helen V. Miller, R.N., Assistant in Nursing, Supervisor, Private 
Patients Nursing Service. 

Diploma in Nursing, The Long Island College Hospital School of Nurs- 
ing, Brooklyn, New York, 1932. 

Edith Nielsen, R.N., Assistant in Nursing, Supervisor, Medical and 
Surgical Nursing Service. 

Diploma in Nursing, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, New 

York, New York, 1931. 

Adelle Sawyer, Assistant in Physical Education. 

Diploma, Bouve Boston School of Physical Education, Boston, Massa- 
chusetts, 1942. 

Ruth Woodfall, R.N., Assistant in Nursing, Supervisor, Pediatric Nurs- 
ing Service. 

Diploma in Nursing, The Children's Hospital School of Nursing 

Boston, Massachusetts, 1932. 

Genevieve Jarosz Young, M.A., Assistant in Sciences. 

B.A., Hunter College, 1939; M.A., Teachers College, Columbia Uni- 
versity, 1944. 

Two to be appointed. 

[46] 



MEMBERS OF THE FACULTY OF CORNELL 

UNIVERSITY MEDICAL COLLEGE WHO 

ARE ALSO MEMBERS OF THE 

FACULTY OF THE SCHOOL 

OF NURSING 

Joseph C. Hinsey, Ph.D Dean — Professor of Anatomy 

David P. Barr, M.D Professor of Medicine 

McKeen Cattell, M.D Professor of Pharmacology 

Joseph P. Chandler, Ph.D Assistant Professor of Biochemistry 

Oskar Diethelm, M.D Professor of Psychiatry 

Edwin J. Doty, M.D Assistant Professor of Psychiatry 

Eugene F. DuBois, M.D Professor of Physiology 

Vincent Du Yigneaud, Ph.D Professor of Biochemistry 

Warner S. Hammond, Ph.D Assistant Professor of Anatomy 

George J. Heuer, M.D Professor of Surgery 

Samuel Z. Levine, M.D Professor of Pediatrics 

John McLeod, Ph.D Instructor of Physiology 

Otto H. Muller, D.Sci Research Associate of Anatomy 

Wilson G. Smillie,M.D., Professor of Public Health and Preventive Medicine 
Henricus J. Stander, M.D. . . . Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology 

Ralph G. Stillman, M.D Assistant Professor of Medicine 

Chester L. Yntema, Ph.D Assistant Professor of Anatomy 

LECTURERS 

Johanna Lee, B.A Chemistry 

Department of Biochemistry 

Cornell University Medical College 
W. R. Redden, M.D Emergency Nursing 

American Red Cross, New York Chapter 
Elizabeth L. Watson, M.A., The New York Hospital . Microbiology 
Mary T. Whitley, Ph.D Child Psychology 

HEALTH SERVICE 

Marian Tyndall, M.D., Edwin Doty, M.D., 

Physician in Chief Consulting Psychiatrist 

[47] 



MEMBERS OF OTHER DEPARTMENTS AND 
ORGANIZATIONS PARTICIPATING IN 
THE NURSING PROGRAM 

NUTRITION DEPARTMENT 

Margaret Gillam, M.A., Director Susan N. Paige, B.S. 

Barbara Correll, B.S. Betty Richmond, B.S. 

Marie Krause, M.S. Marjorie Skinner, B.S. 

Erva Livingston, B.S. Ruth Wayre, B.S. 



OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY DEPARTMENT, 
PAYNE WHITNEY CLINIC 

Elizabeth Spargo, Director 



PHYSICAL THERAPY DEPARTMENT, 
PAYNE WHITNEY CLINIC 

Grace Brindle, Director 



SOCIAL SERVICE DEPARTMENTS 

Theodate H. Soule, M.A., Director, Main Hospital 
Mrs. Virginia T. Kinzel, Director, Woman s Clinic 
Mrs. Melly Simon, Director, Payne Whitney Clinic 

VISITING NURSE SERVICE OF NEW YORK 
Marion Randall, B.S., R.N., Director 



COMMUNITY SERVICE SOCIETY 

Department of Educational Nursing 
Alta E. Dines, M.A., L.H.D., R.N., Director 



[48 



THE SOCIETY OF THE NEW YORK HOSPITAL 

Langdon P. Marvin President, Board of Governors 

Murray Sargent Administrator-in-Chief 



NURSING SERVICE 

STAFF OF ADMINISTRATION 

Bessie A. R. Parker Acting Dean, School of 'Nursing 

Acting Director, Nursing Service 

Charlotte S. Argabrite Night Administrative Assistant 

Cora E. Kay Evening Administrative Assistant 

Sarah E. Moore Day Administrative Assistant 

See Faculty for Heads of Clinical Nursing Services 

NURSING SERVICE COMMITTEE 

Bessie A. R. Parker, Chairman Alice M. Moffatt 

Charlotte S. Argabrite Sarah E. Moore 

Verda F. Hickcox Olive M. Reid 

Cora E. Kay Agnes Schubert 

May Kennedy Carolyne A. Sprogell 

Veronica Lyons Thelma Stone 

SUPERVISORS 

Madeleine O'Brien, Private Patients Service 
(Other Supervisors listed under Faculty) 

HEAD NURSES 

Medical and Surgical Services 

Ruth Brockman Estelle Luba 

Mary Capuano Mary McNeer 

Elizabeth Curtin Marion Meehan 

Leone Delelys Hazel Poole 

Barbara Derr Agnes Rafperty 

Doris Dieterle Stella Smariga 

Janet Dempsey Dunn Edna Stratton 

Antionette Fedorowicz Dorothy Strunk 

Sara Gericke Doris Sweeney 

Anne Gruen Crescentia Troy 

Marguerite Haggerty Arlene Webster 

Emily P. Luomanen Katherine Zorn 

T491 



Out-Patient Service 



Evelyn Clark 
Virginia Codington 
Leta Counihan 
Katherine Drucklieb 
Elizabeth Geiger 
Annabelle Gottesman 
Jean Haseltine 

WlLETTA HAYNES 

Lucille Lambert 
Evelyn Liddle 



Marjorie Liu 
Eleanor Mills 
Elsa Nussbaumer 
Dorothy Parkhill 
Celia Pehr 
Eva Poor 

Margaret Rouchleau 
Elizabeth Talbot 

LuELLA UHRHANE 

Irene Yurchukonis 



Payne Whitney Psychiatric Service 



Marjorie Campbell 
Stella Copley 
Elin Friberg 
Elizabeth Gardner 
Gertrude Goodman 
Elizabeth Hilliard 
Grace Lundgren 



Beatrice McKee 

Dorothy Ranson 

Olga Trupo 

Jessie Weaver 

Mary Goforth Whitaker 

Arlene Wilson 

Faye Wise 



Margaret Hodges 



Pediatric Service 

Marguerite Mershon 
Lois Schouten 



Lois Cantrell 
Faye Dumphy 
Lydia Hansen 
Dorothea James 



Private and Semi-Private Services 



Grace Coates Kurtz 

Ane Nielsen 
Dorothy Shafer 
Lois Tait 



Obstetric and Gynecological Service 



Alma Bott 
Elizabeth Calder 
Florence Campbell 
Anna Colwell 
Agnes Connor 
Florence Gemski Gross 
Clara Hawtin 
Anna Klubko 
Violet Knox 



Esther Lipsheez 

Christine MacAdam 

Margery Patrick Marcussen 

Rose Novak 

Selma Buchdahl Nurick 

Rose Valpreda 

Lucille White 

Kathleen Young 



[50] 




ON THE WAY TO HOSPITAL 



CORNELL UNIVERSITY OFFICIAL PUBLICATION 
VOLUME 37 : AUGUST 1, 1945 : NUMBER 3 



Announcement of 
Cornell University-New York Hospital 

School of Nursing 

for 1945-46 




525 EAST 68th STREET, NEW YORK 21, N. Y. 



Requests for further information should be ad- 
dressed to the Dean, Cornell University-New York 
Hospital School of Nursing, 525 East 68th Str-eet, 
New York 21, N. Y. 

An application form will be sent upon request 
to prospective students able to satisfy the re- 
quirements for admission. 



CORNELL UNIVERSITY OFFICIAL PUBLICATION 

PUBLISHED BY CORNELL UNIVERSITY AT ITHACA, N. Y. 

Monthly in September, October, and November 
Semi-monthly, December to August inclusive 

[Entered as second-class matter, December 14, 1916, at the post office at 
Ithaca, New York, under the act of August 24, 1912] 



CORNELL UNIVERSITY OFFICIAL PUBLICATION 
VOLUME 37 : AUGUST 1, 1945 : NUMBER 3 



Announcement of 
Cornell University- New York Hospital 

School of Nursing 

for 1945-46 



525 EAST 68th STREET, NEW YORK 21, N. Y. 



INDEX 

PAGE 

Administrative Policies 12 

Admissions Requirements 7 

Advanced Standing 11 

Aims of the School 7 

Calendar 4 

Citizenship 12 

Curriculum 9, 17 

Degree and Diploma 12 

Extracurricular Opportunities 15 

Facilities of the School 7 

Faculty 31 

Fees 13 

Health Service 14 

History of the School 5 

Loan Funds 15 

Maintenance and General Expenses 14 

Registration of the School . 6 

Registration and Orientation of New Students 9 

Scholarship Requirements 10 

School Government 16 

State Registration of Graduates 12 

U. S. Cadet Nurse Corps 11 

Vacations and Other Absences 15 




THE NEW YORK HOSPITAL, SOUTH VIEW 



CALENDAR 



1945 




Sept. 25 


Tuesday < 


Sept. 29 


Saturday 


Oct. 12 


Friday 


Nov. 22 


Thursday 


Dec. 25 


Tuesday 


1946 




Jan. 1 


Tuesday 


Jan. 16 


Wednesday 


Feb. 12 


Tuesday 


Feb. 14 


Thursday 


Feb. 22 


Friday 


Feb. 25 


Monday 


May 30 


Thursday 


July 4 


Thursday 


July 17 


Wednesday 


Sept. 2 


Monday 


Sept. 24 


Tuesday 


Sept. 28 


Saturday 


Oct. 12 


Saturday 


Nov. 21 


Thursday 


Dec. 25 


Wednesday 



Commencement (September class) 

Registration (First year students, September 
class) 

Columbus Day — No classes except for pre- 
clinical students 

Thanksgiving Day — No classes 

Christmas Dav — No classes 



New Year's Day — No classes 

Last day for filing applications for February 

class 
Lincoln's Birthday — No classes 
Commencement (February class) 
Washington's Birthday — No classes 

Registration (First year students, Februarv 

class) 
Decoration Day — No classes 
Independence Day — No classes 

Last day for filing applications for September 

class 
Labor Day — No classes 
Commencement (September class) 

Registration (First year students, September 

class) 
Columbus Day — No classes 
Thanksgiving Day — No classes 
Christmas Day — No classes 



TERM DATES 1945-1946 

September Classes February Classes* 

Oct. 1, 1945— Jan. 20, 1946 Oct. 29, 1945— Feb. 17, 1946 

Jan. 21, 1946— May 12, 1946 Feb. 18, 1946— June 9, 1946 

May 13, 1946— Sept. 29, 1946 June 10, 1946— Oct. 28, 1946 



'Term for entering class starts on Registration Day. 



GENERAL STATEMENT 



History 



CORNELL University-New York Hospital School of 
Nursing has the resources of two great institutions of 
learning, both of which have a long history and an envia- 
ble record of achievement in the fields of education and 
public welfare. 

Cornell University received its first endowment from the 
Federal Government's Educational Land Grant of 1862. 
The appropriation under the Morrill Act was to endow a 
college "where the leading object shall be ... to teach 
such branches of learning as are related to agriculture and 
the mechanical arts. ' ' This was the beginning of a remark- 
able system of higher education. It, however, received its 
greatest impetus through the vision and generosity of Ezra 
Cornell who, under the influence of Andrew D. White, his 
colleague and later the first president, determined the form 
of the new University. In 1864 an agreement was reached 
with the Legislature of New York State which resulted in 
the founding of "a University of a new type, ... an insti- 
tution where any person can find instruction in any study." 
This combination of Federal, State, and private interests 
and resources is unique. It gives strength to the organiza- 
tion, broadens the aims and policies of the University, and 
extends the influence of its educational ideals. 

It is interesting to note how one school after another has 
been organized and made a unit of this educational system, 
the most recent of which is the School of Nursing which 
was added in July, 1942. 

The school, known until recently as The New York Hos- 
pital School of Nursing, was organized in 1877 as an inte- 
gral part of The New York Hospital, the second oldest 
hospital in America maintained by private endowment. 
George the Third of England granted the hospital its 

[5] 



charter of incorporation on June 13, 1771, under the title 
of the Society of the Hospital in the City of New York in 
America. In 1810 the title was changed to The Society of 
the New York Hospital by an Act of the New York 
Legislature. 

This hospital has the distinction of being the first insti- 
tution in America devoted to the care of the sick to give 
organized instruction to its nursing personnel. It was in 
1799 that Doctor Valentine Seaman, a scholarly man and 
prominent physician, organized a series of lectures com- 
bined with a course of practical instruction in the wards. 
This cannot be considered the beginning of the school, but 
it certainly formed the groundwork. 

In June, 1927, The New York Hospital completed an 
association with Cornell University Medical College. Five 
years later they moved to their present location on York 
Avenue, between sixty-eighth and seventy-first streets. 
The increased facilities thus made available contributed to 
the progressive development of the School of Nursing and 
it seemed only a natural consequence that on its sixty-fifth 
anniversary it became a unit in a great university. 

The school is justly proud of its seventeen hundred gradu- 
ates among whom are many who have nation-wide recog- 
nition for their outstanding contributions in the various 
fields of nursing. 

Registration of the School 

The School of Nursing is registered by the Regents of the 
University of the State of New York and its graduates are 
eligible to take the state board examinations for license as 
registered professional nurses. 

The school is accredited by the National League of Nurs- 
ing Education which functions as the Department of Edu- 
cation of the American Nurses' Association. 

The hospital is approved by the American College of 
Surgeons and is a member of the American Hospital Asso- 
ciation. It is also approved for internships by the American 
Medical Association. 

[6] 



Aims of the School of Nursing 

Nursing offers a challenge to young women of excep- 
tional personal and professional qualifications who are 
interested in social welfare. The aim of Cornell University- 
New York Hospital School of Nursing is to prepare care- 
fully selected students in the fundamental principles of 
nursing and their practical application to the various 
clinical aspects of patient care in the hospital, in the home, 
and in other community service. Emphasis is placed on 
health teaching throughout the entire course. The develop- 
ment of the individual student as a responsible member of 
civic and social life is a significant outcome of the program. 

Facilities for the School 

A special building for the School of Nursing is adjacent 
to the hospital buildings. It provides adequate and well 
equipped class-rooms, laboratories, library, and recreation 
rooms as well as attractive and comfortable living accom- 
modations for students and faculty. 

Further necessary laboratory and library facilities are 
available through association with the Cornell University 
Medical College. 

The clinical facilities of The New York Hospital are un- 
surpassed for the care and study of patients. The hospital 
with a capacity of over one thousand beds admits all types 
of patients including medical, surgical, obstetric, gyne- 
cological, pediatric, and psychiatric. The out-patient de- 
partment provides ample opportunity for the study of 
ambulatory patients. 

Close cooperation with the Visiting Nurse Service of 
New York and other community agencies affords oppor- 
tunities for observation in a community nursing program. 

The social service department of The New York Hospital 
participates in the nursing course through the integration 
of social service in the program of study. 

Requirements for Admission 

A qualifying certificate from the Board of Regents of the 
State of New York is necessary for admission. The form 

[7] 



for requesting this certificate will be sent an applicant 
from the office of the Dean of the School of Nursing after 
application for admission to the school has been filed. 

Requirements for admission include the satisfactory com- 
pletion of two years of work in an accredited college. Stu- 
dents of unusual merit and promise who have less than the 
above requirements may be given special consideration. 

The following units of study in an accredited high school 
or a recognized preparatory school are required : 

English, four years 3 units 

History 1 unit 

Civics y 2 unit 

Mathematics 2 units 

Algebra 1 unit 

Plane geometry 1 unit 

Science 2 units 

General science or biology. . . 1 unit 

Chemistry 1 unit 

Foreign language, three years of one 
language or two years of each of two 

languages 3 or 4 units 

Electives (According to the amount of 

foreign language offered) 3>^ or V/ 2 units 

Total 15 units 

It is recommended that prospective students include in 
their college program basic courses in general chemistry or 
inorganic and organic chemistry, zoology or biology, and 
the social sciences including psychology. Emphasis is 
placed upon scholarship of applicants. 

Besides these scholastic admission requirements appli- 
cants should be at least eighteen and not over thirty years 
of age and must present evidence of physical and personal 
fitness for nursing. 

It is desirable that the applicant and her parent or 
guardian arrange for an interview with the Dean of the 
School of Nursing after formal application has been sub- 
mitted. An appointment will be made upon request. 

[8] 



At their own expense applicants must also present a 
report from the Nurse Testing Division for Schools of 
Nursing of the Psychological Corporation. Upon applica- 
tion to Cornell University-New York Hospital School of 
Nursing the card of application for admission to this 
examination will be forwarded to the applicant with 
necessary instructions. 

The Admissions Committee takes into account all in- 
formation received from these various sources in judging 
the suitability of an individual for admission to the School 
of Nursing. 

An applicant must deposit $25.00 upon notification of 
acceptance for admission to the school. This deposit is 
credited toward fees payable on registration day but is not 
refundable if the applicant withdraws before that date. 

All applications for admission should be addressed to 
the Dean, Cornell University-New York Hospital School 
of Nursing, 525 East Sixty-eighth Street, New York 21, 
New York. 

(See "Calendar" for admission dates and last days j or filing 
applications?) 

Registration and Orientation 

First year students must be at the school not later than 
10:00 a.m. on registration day. (See '"Calendar" for exact 
date.) 

A brief orientation program precedes formal instruction. 
During this time students have necessary physical exami- 
nations with Schick, Dick, and Mantoux tests, are 
measured for uniforms, and procure books and other 
equipment. 

The Curriculum 

The three-year curriculum of the School of Nursing is so 
planned as to give each student a thorough understanding 
of the basic sciences and principles underlying good nurs- 
ing and of the best methods to use in the care of the sick, 
in the prevention of disease, and in health education. 

The school year is divided into three terms. Each term 
of the third year is divided into two units and all formal 

[9] 



teaching is completed in the first three units. The last 
three units are assigned to supervised practice in con- 
formity with the requirements of the United States Public 
Health Service for those schools participating in the U. S. 
Cadet Nurse Corps program. 

During the first term and a half of the first year limited 
nursing practice is given in the pavilions of the hospital 
and the clinics of the out-patient department while a 
greater amount of time is spent in class and laboratory. 
In subsequent terms the student's nursing practice increases 
in length of time and in responsibility. A sequence is 
planned to include the various types of clinical services 
during day, evening, and night periods. An introduction 
to community nursing is provided in order that the 
student may acquire a more complete understanding of 
patients' needs. 

During the clinical terms each student is scheduled forty- 
eight hours a week, which includes all class and nursing 
practice assignments. 

Scholarship Requirements for Promotion 
and Graduation 

The established system of grading is the literal scale of 
F to A, with D as the lowest passing grade. 

An average of C for a given term is required for pro- 
motion without condition. A grade of C is required in the 
course Introduction to Nursing Arts, and a grade of B in the 
course Drugs and Solutions. A grade below C in any clinical 
field of nursing practice or a term average which is less 
than C places a student on major warning. This must be 
removed by the end of the next term to insure further 
promotion. A student on major warning is ineligible to 
hold office in student organizations. 

A grade of I (incomplete) is assigned if the work of a 
course is not completed because of illness or unavoidable 
absence and if, in the judgment of the instructor, the stu- 
dent has shown evidence that she can complete the course 
satisfactorily in a reasonable length of time. 

An F (failure) in any given subject may necessitate with- 

[10] 



drawal from the school unless the student's scholarship 
is exceptional in other respects, in which case repetition of 
the course may be recommended by the instructor. 

A cumulative average of C for three years' work is re- 
quired for graduation. 

Advanced Standing 

An applicant who has received her baccalaureate degree 
may have her time in the school reduced by two to six 
months if she maintains an average of B in theory and in 
practice throughout the course. Exemption must be re- 
quested during the last term of the second year. 

United States Cadet Nurse Corps 

The United States Cadet Nurse Corps has been organized 
in an effort to meet the critical shortage in nursing services 
caused by the war emergency. A unit of the Corps has 
been established in the School of Nursing. Membership is 
voluntary and open to any student who is willing to agree 
to serve in military, governmental, or essential civilian 
nursing service until the end of hostilities. 

Applicants who wish to be enrolled in the Cadet Nurse 
Corps must meet the same admission requirements as other 
applicants. After registering in the school they have the 
same rights and privileges as other students and must meet 
the same requirements for promotion. Upon graduation, 
they are eligible for State licensure. 

Required fees and expenses will be paid through Federal 
funds for all students joining the Corps at least ninety days 
before the cessation of hostilities. Their maintenance will be 
paid for the first nine months. Thereafter maintenance is 
provided by the school . Corps members will receive Federal 
stipends at the rate of $15.00 per month during the first 
nine months and $20.00 per month from the tenth through 
the thirtieth month. From the thirty-first through the 
thirty-sixth month the hospital agrees to pay a stipend 
of $30. 00 per month. 

Attractive outdoor uniforms are provided and a dis- 
tinctive insignia will be worn on the indoor uniform. 

[11] 



Members of the Cadet Corps who withdraw from the 
school, either voluntarily or upon advice of the faculty, 
must return membership card, all distinctive Corps in- 
signia, and all textbooks and indoor uniform accessories 
provided through Federal funds. If in the school less than 
nine months at the time of withdrawal, all outdoor 
uniforms must be returned. 

General Administrative Policies 

Cornell University-New York Hospital School of Nurs- 
ing reserves the privilege of retaining in the school only 
those students who in the judgment of its faculty satisfy 
the requirements of scholarship, health, and personal 
suitability for the nursing profession. 

It also reserves the prerogative of changing its curricu- 
lum, educational policies, and fees as deemed necessary 
for the progressive development of the school. 

Degree and Diploma 

All students will receive a diploma in nursing from the 
Society of the New York Hospital upon satisfactory com- 
pletion of the course. Those students who enter the school 
with at least two years of college work acceptable to 
Cornell University will be granted in addition the degree 
of Bachelor of Science in Nursing from the University. 

State Registration and Citizenship Requirements 

Students who satisfactorily complete the course are 
eligible for admission to the examination for license as a 
registered professional nurse in New York State if they 
submit evidence of citizenship in the United States or have 
declared intention of becoming a citizen. If citizenship is 
not completed within seven years from the date of the 
declaration of intention, State licensure is revoked. This 
ruling is in accordance with the law of New York State. 



[12] 



Fees 

First Year 

Matriculation Fee $11.00 

Administration Fee 20.00 

Tuition Fee 100.00 

Payable at registration $75-00 

Payable at beginning of second 

term, first year 25.00 

Laboratory Fee 25.00 

Chemistry Breakage (refundable if not 

used) 5-00 

Library Fee 2.00 

Health Service Fee 10.00 



Second Year 

Tuition Fee $50.00 

Library Fee 1.50 

Health Service Fee 5-00 



Third Year 

Tuition Fee $50.00 

Library Fee 1.50 

Health Service Fee 5-00 

Graduation Fee 15-00 

Degree Fee 5-00 

Graduation and degree fees payable at 
beginning of fourth unit, third year. Re- 
fundable if student is not graduated. 



$173-00 



56.50 



76.50 
Grand Total $306.00 

In addition to these fees students pay an annual Student 
Organization Fee of $5-25 which is collected by the class 
treasurer. 

[13] 



Maintenance and General Expenses 

The School of Nursing provides maintenance and limited 

gratuitous care in case of illness. Each student is furnished 

with uniforms and caps which remain the property of the 

school. 

The following estimated expenses must be met by the 

student: 

1st yr. 
1st term 2nd yr. 3rd yr. Optional 

Uniform aprons, bibs, and 

accessories $26.50 $3.00 

Uniform shoes 8.60 8.60 

Uniform sweater 4.25 

Uniform cape $15-00 

Gymnasium suits 10.00 

Books, keys, bandage scis- 
sors, and miscellaneous 
supplies 30.00 $5-00 5-00 10.00 

Rental laboratory coat .. . 1.00 

Rental Public Health uni- 
forms 1.50 

Expenses for Public Health 

and other observations.. 2.00 10.00 2.00 



$82.35 $16.50 $18.60 $25.00 

None of the aforementioned articles should be purchased 
before admission to the school. Students should be pro- 
vided with an allowance for other personal needs deter- 
mined by individual requirements. A list of necessary 
personal equipment will be sent each prospective student 
when accepted for admission. For the three-year course 
the total cost to the student should not exceed four 
hundred fifty dollars in addition to personal expenditures 
as determined by the student. 

Health Regulations and Service 

The School of Nursing maintains a health service for its 
students. A well equipped infirmary with necessary stafT is 

[14] 



provided in the nurses' residence. A physical examination 
by the school physician with chest x-rays is required upon 
admission to the school and subsequent annual physical 
examinations will be given. 

Vaccinations against typhoid fever and smallpox will be 
required of all students before admission to the school. 
Schick and Dick tests and immunization for positive reac- 
tion to the Schick test will be required of all students 
after admission to the school. Mantoux tests will be 
given during the pre-clinical period and for those who 
are negative will be repeated at regular intervals. 

Gratuitous infirmary care for minor illnesses will be 
limited to four weeks at any one time in the case of all stu- 
dents. For more serious illnesses students will be cared for 
gratuitously in the hospital for not more than two weeks 
at any one time for the first-year students, and not more 
than four weeks at any one time for second and third year 
students. Expenses for special nursing care and special 
therapies must be borne by the student or her family. 

Vacations and Other Absences 

A vacation of four weeks is given in each of the first 
two years and two weeks in the third year. Students who 
have an exemption of time are not granted a vacation in the 
third year. All vacations are arranged to conform to the 
requirements of the educational program. 

As a result of absences the repetition of a course of study 
or special examinations may be required, class registration 
may be changed, and in necessary instances nursing practice 
will have to be made up. 

Loan Funds 

Student loan funds have been established, and are availa- 
ble after the first term in the school, for those who need 
financial aid and show promise in nursing. Application 
should be made in writing to the Dean of the School. 

Extracurricular Opportunities 

Believing that the education of young women today 
must include activities relating to healthful social rela- 
te] 



tionships, generous provision for this development in the 
life of the student has been made. 

The beautiful fireproof, sixteen-story residence, erected 
adjacent to the hospital buildings, is the center for these 
activities. Every effort has been made in its construction 
and equipment to provide for the normal and healthy life 
of students and faculty. 

Each of the eight student residence floors contains at- 
tractively furnished single bedrooms with lavatories, 
ample common baths, showers, and toilet facilities, a com- 
mon sitting-room with adjoining kitchenette for informal 
gatherings, and a laundryette. The increased enrollment 
incident to the war emergency has made it necessary to 
assign two students to some of the larger bedrooms. 

Comfortable lounges, reading, reception, and dining- 
rooms are on the first and ground floors. 

For further recreational activities, a large, well equipped 
gymnasium, game-rooms, tennis courts, and porches are 
available. Arrangements for the use of an indoor swimming 
pool are made. 

To insure the full benefit and proper use of these facilities, 
well-qualified instructors are appointed to direct the social 
and recreational activities of the school. 

School Government 

The School of Nursing has a cooperative government in 
which the students take an active part. A student organi- 
zation has been established and functions with the Faculty 
Committee on Student Affairs in all matters relating to 
social and professional conduct and discipline. 

An annual student activities fee of $5-25 is required and 
collected by each class. 



[16 



THE CURRICULUM 

First Year 

Class and Approx- 
Labora- imate 
torv Hours 

Hours Practice 
(Orientation — includes Personal Hygiene — 

8 hours, and Personality Study — 6 hours) 30 

Anatomy 60 

Chemistry 55 

Microbiology 50 

Clinical Pathology 20 

Physiology 50 

History of Nursing 24 

Elementary Psychology 30 

Psychology of Deviate Behavior 15 

Introduction to Nursing Arts 95 283 

Professional Adjustments 1 15 

Nutrition and Cookery 30 

Diet Therapy 30 

Social and Economic Aspects of Health and 

Disease 30 

Pharmacology and Therapeutics 30 

Medicine 40 

Communicable Diseases 14 

Medical Nursing, including Communicable 

Disease Nursing 45 500 

Surgery 38 

Surgical Nursing 30 500 

Totals 731 1283 



[17] 



Second Year 



Class and 
Labora- 
tory 
Hours 



Approx- 
imate 
Hours 
Practice 
192 
192 
359 

688 



Medical Nursing 

Diet Therapy Practice 

Operative Technique 15 

Pediatrics 20 

Pediatric Nursing 50 

Obstetrics and Gynecology 30 

Obstetric and Gynecological Nursing 30 698 

Includes 48 hours observation in the 

Public Health field 
Development of Behavior in Children 30 

Totals 175 2129 

Third Year 
(Accelerated program) 

First half of year 

Medical Nursing 8 172 

Surgical Nursing 8 172 

Emergency Nursing 22 

Professional Adjustments II 15 

Psychiatry 30 

Psychiatric Nursing 30 316 

Family and Community Health 20 

Out-Patient Nursing 356 

Includes 48 hours in Nutrition Clinic 

Second half of year 

Medical Nursing 240 

Surgical Nursing 240 

Psychiatric Nursing 384 

Private Patients Nursing 192 

Out-Patient Nursing 192 

Totals ~133 2264 

Grand Total Hours 1039 5676 

Two or more hours a week of bedside instruction and conferences, 
which approximate a total of 244 hours, are included in practice 
assignments. 

For Physical Education see Description of Courses. 

[18] 



DESCRIPTION OF COURSES 

Preclinical Sciences 

100. Anatomy 

This course includes both gross and microscopical 
anatomy. The gross anatomy is taught by lectures, demon- 
strations, and student dissection of the cadaver. The 
microscopical work is directly correlated with the gross 
dissection and includes a detailed study of prepared slides. 
Significant embryological information is included in the 
lectures. 

60 Hours, First Year 

Dr. Hinsey, Dr. Yntema, Dr. Hammond 

101. Chemistry 

A course designed to acquaint students with the funda- 
mental principles of inorganic and physiological chemistry 
with special application to nursing practice. Studies in the 
general composition of the blood and urine, and in the 
digestion and utilization of foods are included. Lectures, 
recitations, demonstrations, and laboratory. 

55 Hours, First Year 

Dr. DuVigneaud, Miss Rynbergen, 

Dr. Summerson, Mrs. Lee, Mrs. Young 

102. Microbiology 

An introduction to the study of microorganisms, par- 
ticularly the microbial agents of disease. Sources, modes 
of spread, and prevention of infectious diseases; principles 
and practice of asepsis. Applications of bacteriology and 
immunology to the diagnosis, prevention and treatment 
of infectious diseases. 

50 Hours, First Year 
Dr. Neill, Dr. Hehre 

[19] 



103. Clinical Pathology 

A brief orientation course designed to acquaint the 
student with some of the more common laboratory pro- 
cedures and to indicate the relation of the clinical labora- 
tories to hospital activities. It presents pathologic changes 
in infections and neoplasms, hematology, blood grouping 
and transfusions, urinalysis and parasitology with prac- 
tice in a few of the technics. The blood group of each 
student is ascertained and recorded. Lectures, conferences 
and laboratory. 

20 Hours, First Year 
Dr. Stillman 



104. Pharmacology and Therapeutics 

A course designed to acquaint the student with the fun- 
damental weights, measures, terms, and symbols used in 
the preparation and administration of drugs, common anti- 
septics, disinfectants, and other solutions. A study of im- 
portant and commonly used drugs, their preparation, dos- 
age, administration, physiological and therapeutic ac- 
tions, idiosyncrasies, cumulative and minor toxic symp- 
toms, antidotes and emergency treatments. Emphasis is 
placed on the accurate administration of drugs and the 
careful observation of their effects through supervised 
practice in nursing courses. 

30 Hours, First Year 
Dr. Cattell, Mr. Clarke 

105. Physiology 

This course is designed to give a basic understanding of 
the functions of the normal human body as an essential 
prerequisite to the study of health and nutrition and the 
pathological changes due to disease. Lectures, recitations, 
demonstrations, and laboratory. 

50 Hours, First Year 

Dr. DuBois, Miss Rynbergen, 

Dr. McLeod, Mrs. Young 

T201 



Medical Nursing 

110. Medicine 

Medical aspects of diseases are considered in these lec- 
tures and clinics. Material presented will supplement, em- 
phasize, and interpret required reading covering etiology, 
sources of infection, symptomatology, usual course pathol- 
ogy, complications, treatment, prognosis, and prevention. 

40 Hours, First Year 
Dr. Barr and staff 

111. Communicable Diseases 

A study of communicable diseases, including tuberculo- 
sis. Special emphasis is placed upon etiology, modes of 
transmission, and prevention. Lectures and clinics. 

14 Hours, First Year 
Dr. Barr and staff 

112. Principles of Medical Nursing Including Communi- 

cable Disease Nursing 
Through lectures, clinics, and demonstrations, students 
are taught principles and methods of nursing as applied to 
the care of medical patients. In the third year emphasis is 
placed upon managerial and teaching problems and cur- 
rent developments requiring new methods of treatment. 
45 Hours, First Year 
8 Hours, Third Year 
Miss Lyons, Mrs. Crispell, Miss Moehring 

113- Practice of Medical Nursing Including Communicable 
Disease Nursing 
Supervised practice and study of the application of medi- 
cal nursing principles and methods to the care of patients 
on the medical pavilions of the hospital. In addition stu- 
dents study and practice medical aseptic nursing as related 
to the care of patients suffering from communicable dis- 
eases including tuberculosis. Practice includes care of pa- 
tients and managerial experience during day, evening, and 
night. Demonstrations and conferences. 

1104 Hours, First, Second, and Third Years 
(includes 384 hours of communicable disease nursing) 
Miss Lyons, Mrs. Crispell, Miss Henderson, Miss 
Hills, Miss Moehring, Miss Swanwick and staff 

[21] 



114. Practice in Care of Private Patients 

Application of principles of medical and surgical nursing 
to the care of private patients. 

192 Hours, Third Year 

Miss Moffatt, Mrs. Miller and staff 

Nursing 

120. Orientation 

This course is designed to give the beginning student a 
general conception of the field of nursing; the responsibili- 
ties and obligations of each individual in choosing the pro- 
fession; the importance of general conduct in building up 
the right habits of living and attitudes of the nurse. It 
includes lectures in personal hygiene and personality study, 
emphasizing the importance of physical and mental health 
especially as it relates to the life of the nurse and is re- 
flected in her work. 

30 Hours, First Year 

Miss Parker, Miss Kennedy, Mrs. Overholser, 

Dr. Doty, Dr. Lansdown, Miss McDermott 

121. a. Introduction to Nursing Arts 

A course designed to give the student a basic understand- 
ing of the principles of nursing with emphasis upon her at- 
titude toward her patient, the existing social relationships, 
the physical requirements for the proper care of patients, 
and the procedures found most helpful for the promotion 
of health. Lectures and demonstrations. 

95 Hours, First Year 
Miss Stone 

121. b. Practice of Elementary Nursing 

Practice includes application of the theories of nursing 
in laboratory practice, in the surgical supply room, and in 
the actual care of convalescent patients in the pavilions and 
out-patient department of the hospital. 

283 Hours, First Year 

Miss Stone, Miss Deaterly, Miss A. McCluskey, 

Miss Zorn 

[22] 



122. History of Nursing 

A survey of the historical development of nursing from 
its early conception to modern times. Lectures and panel 
discussions. 

24 Hours, First Year 
Mrs. Overholser 

123. Professional Adjustments I 

A general consideration of fundamental ethical and phil- 
osophical principles and their application to problems 
which arise in the practice of nursing. An attempt is made 
to coordinate this course closely with each course of nurs- 
ing practice through class discussions of pertinent prob- 
lems. Lectures and conferences. 

15 Hours, First Year 
Mrs. Overholser 

124. Professional Adjustments II 

Through a general survey of the nursing field, the stu- 
dent has an opportunity to learn the trends and advances in 
the profession; the need and opportunities for specialized 
preparation; the importance and types of legislation; the 
activities of professional organizations and the obligations 
of their members. Lectures and conferences. 

15 Hours, Third Year 

Miss Parker and special lecturers 

125. Emergency Nursing 

This course supplements the instruction in nursing and 
deals with the application of these principles to emergency 
situations in the home and community. Lectures and 
demonstrations. First Aid certificate granted by American 
Red Cross. 

22 Hours, Third Year 
Dr. Redden 

See description of other courses in nursing relating to 
specific clinical fields. 

[23] 



Nutrition 

130. Nutrition and Cookery 

An elementary course in normal adult nutrition and in 
food preparation. In addition, the nutrition requirements 
in childhood and in pregnancy are discussed during the 
student's practice on pediatric and obstetric services. 

30 Hours, First Year 
Miss Rynbergen, Mrs. Young 

131. Diet Therapy 

A course designed to present the underlying principles 
in treatment of disease by means of special dietaries; given 
concurrently with the lectures in Medical and Surgical 
Diseases. This course is supplemented by conference work 
during the student's practice on medical and surgical 
services. Lectures, recitations, and laboratory. 

30 Hours, First Year 
Miss Rynbergen, Mrs. Young 

132. Practice of Diet Therapy 

The application of the principles of diet therapy in super- 
vised practice on the pavilions in the hospital. Conferences 
and case studies. 

192 Hours, Second Year 

Miss Gillam, Miss Rynbergen, Mrs. Young, 

Miss Skinner, Miss Tillotson, Miss Traynor, 

Miss Warye 

Obstetrics and Gynecology 

140. Obstetrics and Gynecology 

This course deals with physiological and pathological 
changes during pregnancy, labor, and puerperium; the care 
of the normal newborn; the nutrition of the mother and 
baby; the prevention of complications; the social signifi- 
cance of infant and maternal mortality; the relation of 
obstetrics to various gynecological conditions; the results 
of infection and tumor growth and the required surgical 
interference and operative treatment. Lectures. 

30 Hours, Second Year 

Dr. Stander and staff 

Miss Rynbergen, Mrs. Young 

[24] 



sc 



141. Principles of Obstetric and Gynecological Nursing 

This course emphasizes the importance of prenatal in- 
struction, observation, and care; infant, obstetric, and 
gynecological nursing procedure with particular attention 
to infections and their special therapy. Classes, demonstra- 
tions, and conferences. 

30 Hours, Second Year 

Miss Klein, Miss Boyle, Mrs. Bourgeois, 

Miss Geuss, Miss Walters, Miss Rynbergen, 

Mrs. Tolley, Mrs. Young 

142. Practice of Obstetric and Gynecological Nursing 

Under supervised practice in the pavilions, nurseries, 
operating rooms, labor and delivery rooms, and out- 
patient department, students have the opportunity to 
observe and care for infants and obstetric and gynecologi- 
cal patients. It also includes one week of observation and 
limited participation in planning under the supervision of 
the Visiting Nurse Service of New York. (See Course 163.) 
Nursing practice, case studies, and conferences. 

698 Hours, Second Year 

Miss Klein, Mrs. Bourgeois, Miss Geuss, 

Mrs. Sillcox, Miss Walters and staff 

Mrs. Overholser, Miss Boyle 

Pediatrics 

150. Pediatrics 

This course emphasizes the influence of social, economic, 
and medical contributions on normal growth and de- 
velopment. Through a study of representative diseases of 
infancy and childhood, the resulting effects on morbidity 
and mortality are shown. Lectures and clinics. 

20 Hours, Second Year 
Dr. Levine and staff 

151. Principles of Pediatric Nursing 

The basic principles in the care of well and sick infants 
and children are given together with the social, educa- 

[25] 



tional, and nutritional aspects of their treatment and be- 
havior as normal children. Classes, conferences, and 
demonstrations. 

50 Hours, Second Year 

Miss Schubert, Mrs. Blatt, Miss Ferguson, Miss 

Rebentisch, Miss Woodfall and staff 

Miss Rynbergen, Mrs. Young 

152. Practice of Pediatric Nursing 

This consists of supervised experience in aseptic nursing 
methods in the care of infants and children in the pavilion, 
formula laboratory, premature nursery, and out-patient 
department. Case studies and conferences. 

688 Hours, Second Year 

Miss Schubert, Miss Ferguson, Miss Meigs, 

Miss Rebentisch, Miss Steigerwalt, 

Miss Woodfall and staff 

Mrs Blatt, Miss Craver, Miss Johnson 

153. Development of Behavior in Children 

A study of the normal child and his behavior. The sus- 
ceptibility of the child's behavior responses to the various 
details of family life and of school will be emphasized. 
Lectures and recitations. 

30 Hours, Second Year 
Miss Whitley 

Personal Hygiene and Public Health 

Personal Hygiene 

(8 hours — Included in Course 120. Orientation.) 

160. Physical Education 

Each student will be required to participate in regular 
physical exercise. This program is designed primarily to 
maintain positive health with emphasis upon posture and 
corrective measures and to stimulate sportsmanship. 

64 Hours, Each Year 

Miss McDermott, Miss Smith 

[26] 



161. Social and Economic Aspects of Health and Disease 

This course attempts to relate the care of the patient in 
the hospital to the home and the community situation. 
Discussion of the nurse's part in the prevention of illness 
and the promotion of health. Lectures and conferences. 

30 Hours, First Year 

Mrs. Overholser, Miss Soule 

162. Family and Community Health 

An introduction to the study of public health; local, 
state, and national services. In connection with field obser- 
vations a brief survey of public health nursing is given; 
its development, aims, opportunities, requirements, and 
preparation. Lectures. 

20 Hours, Third Year 

Dr. Smillie, Mrs. Overholser 

163- Community Nursing Principles and Practice 

Nursing practice in the out-patient department; visits of 
observation to community agencies; contact with the 
home through the social service department and public 
health nursing agencies in the community. 
48 Hours, Second Year 

Observation, Visiting Nurse Service of New York 
548 Hours, Third Year 

Medical and Surgical Out-Patient Department 
Mrs. Overholser, Miss Reid, Miss Boyle, Miss Poor, 
and staff, Miss Rynbergen and Miss Richmond 
Social Service Department, Miss Soule and staff 

Psychiatry 
170. Psychiatry 

A course of study designed to acquaint students with 
psychopathic conditions, their etiology, pathology, and 
treatment. Included in this course is an historical survey of 
psychiatry and the mental hygiene movement, a discussion 
of the problems most frequently found in the different 
periods of human development: nursery school age, pre- 

[27] 



puberty, adolescent, climactic, and senile. An introduction 
to the techniques and social agencies available in helping 
people meet their problems. 

30 Hours, Third Year 
Dr. Diethelm and staff 

171. Principles of Psychiatric Nursing 

This course is organized to give students an understand- 
ing of the basic principles in the nursing care of personality 
disorders and the nursing procedures used in their treat- 
ment. Emphasis is placed also upon the relation of emotion- 
al disturbances to physical illness and of early development 
to future adult life. Lectures, demonstrations, and clinics. 

30 Hours, Third Year 

Miss Sprogell, Miss Corrigan, Miss Joinville, 

Miss Lewis, Miss Santos and staff, Miss Paige 



172. a. Practice of Psychiatric Nursing 

The application of the principles of psychiatric nursing 
through supervised practice in and conferences on the care 
of adults both in the in-patient and out-patient depart- 
ments. Behavior studies and case studies. Two eight-week 
periods. 

650 Hours, Third Year 

Miss SprogeJl, Miss Corrigan, Miss Gnau, Miss Joinville, 

Miss Lewis, Miss Santos and staff 



172. b. Special Therapeutics in Psychiatric Nursing 

An opportunity is given the student for observation and 
practice in hydrotherapy, occupational and recreational 
therapies, with special emphasis on needs of the individual 
patient. Conferences and supervised practice. 

50 Hours, Third Year, Second Period 
Miss Spargo, Miss Brindle 

[28] 



Psychology 

180. Elementary Psychology 

An introduction to the study of human behavior and the 
underlying principles of mental adjustments and habit for- 
mation. An effort is made to apply this study to the stu- 
dent's own personality and give her a more scientific basis 
by which she can get a better understanding of the be- 
havior of herself, her co-workers, and her patients. 
Lectures and recitations. 

30 Hours, First Year 
Miss Kennedy 

181. Psychology of Deviate Behavior 

A study of the deviations in behavior of adults and 
children, due to organic and sociological factors, and of 
the nursing care necessary in assisting patients in making 
more adequate adjustments during illness. The principles 
of mental hygiene are emphasized. Lectures and recitations. 

15 Hours, First Year 
Miss Kennedy 

Development of Behavior in Children (See Pediatrics) 



Surgical Nursixg 

190. Surgery 

Surgical aspects of diseases are presented in these lectures 
and clinics. Factors determining the need for surgical 
interference are discussed and the major steps in the opera- 
tion outlined. Special emphasis is placed upon signs, 
symptoms, and observations w r hich should be made both 
preceding and following operation. 

38 Hours, First Year 
Dr. Heuer and staff 

[29] 



191. Principles of Surgical Nursing 

Through lectures and demonstrations students are taught 
the principles and methods of surgical asepsis aud the nurs- 
ing of surgical patients. In the third year emphasis is 
placed upon managerial and teaching problems, and cur- 
rent developments requiring new methods of treatment. 

30 Hours, First Year 
8 Hours, Third Year 
Miss Lyons, Miss Fedder, Miss Harmon, 
Miss Hunt, Miss C. McCluskey 



192. Practice of Surgical Nursing 

Supervised practice and study of the application of nurs- 
ing principles to the care of patients on surgical pavilions 
of the hospital. Practice includes care of patients and 
managerial experience during the day, evening, and night. 
Demonstrations and conferences. 

912 Hours, First and Third Years 
Miss Lyons, Miss Fedder, Miss Harmon, 
Miss Henderson, Miss Hills, Miss Hunt 
Miss C. McCluskey, Miss Swanwick and 
staff 



193- Operative Technique 

This course is designed to give the student a thorough 
understanding of surgical aseptic technique. It is planned 
to develop dexterity and intelligent response in assisting 
with operations and in meeting surgical emergencies. 
Experience is given in the general operating room and 
the gynecological operating room. 

15 Hours, lectures, demonstrations, and conferences 
359 Hours, practice, Second Year 
Miss Lyons, Miss Haslup and staff 



[30] 



CORNELL UNIVERSITY-NEW YORK 
HOSPITAL SCHOOL OF NURSING 

STAFF OF ADMINISTRATION 

Edmund Ezra Day President of the University 

Bessie A. R. Parker Acting Dean 

May Kennedy Associate Director 



ASSISTANTS IN ADMINISTRATION 

Flora J. Bergstrom Librarian 

Dorothy Jacobus Registrar 

Mary Alice Slack Assistant Registrar 

Margaret Vogel Secretary 



EXECUTIVE FACULTY 

Edmund Ezra Day Elizabeth Moser 

Joseph C. Hinsey Margery T. Oyerholser 

May Kennedy Bessie A. R. Parker 

Mary E. Klein Olive M. Reid 

Veronica Lyons Agnes Schubert 

Alice M. Moffatt Carolyne A. Sprogell 

Sarah E. Moore Henricus J. Stander 

[31] 



STANDING COMMITTEES OF THE FACULTY 

Committee on Curriculum 
Bessie A. R. Parker, Chairman Samuel Levine 

OSKAR DlETHELM VERONICA LYONS 

George J. Heuer Margery Overholser 

May Kennedy Thelma Stone 

Mary Klein Chester L. Yntema 

Committee on Nursing Principles and Practice 

Thelma Stone, Chairman Margaret Joinville 

Helma Fedder Mabel Moehring 

Catherine P. Geuss M. Eva Poor 

Ruth E. Woodfall 

Committee on Admissions 

Mary Klein, Chairman Margaret Joinville 

Elizabeth Harmon Sarah E. Moore 

Thelma Stone 
Eugene F. Bradford, Director of Admissions 
Cornell University, Member ex-officio 

Committees on Promotion 

FIRST YEAR STUDENTS 

Thelma Stone, Chairman Catherine McClusky 

Mabel Crispell Henderika Rynbergen 

Margery E. Smith 

SECOND YEAR STUDENTS 

Jean Rebentisch, Chairman Veronica Lyons 

BURNETTA BLATT JeANETTE WALTERS 

Martha Haslup Genevieve Young 

third year students 

Eleanor Corrigan, Chairman Helen Miller 
Helma Fedder Mabel Moehring 

Olive Reid 

[32] 



Library Committee 
May Kennedy, Chairman Jean Rebentisch 

Flora J. Bergstrom Olive M. Reid 

Mabel Crispell Henderika Rynbergen 

Elizabeth Harmon Elvin H. Santos 

Margery Overholser Jeanette Walters 

Committee on Records 
May Kennedy, Chairman Alice M. Moffatt 

Mary Klein Olive M. Reid 

Veronica Lyons Agnes Schubert 

Carolyne A. Sprogell 

Committee on Student and Staff Health 
Margery Overholser, Chairman Frances Lansdown 
Eleanor M. Corrigan Veronica Lyons 

Sarah Ferguson Helen Miller 

Rita Genner Elizabeth Moser 

Mary Klein Olive M. Reid 

Committee on Scholarship Aid and Student ho an 
May Kennedy, Chairman Barbara Hunt 

Agnes Schubert 

Committee on Affiliating Students 
Frances Boyle, Chairman Marguerite Bourgeois 

Agnes Schubert 

Committee on Graduate Courses 
Margery Overholser, Chairman Elizabeth Moser 
Mary Klein Olive M. Reid 

Veronica Lyons Carolyne A. Sprogell 

Committee on Student Affairs 
Catherine Geuss, Chairman Mary McDermott 
Eleanor Lewis Elizabeth Moser 

Henderika Rynbergen 

ALUMNAE COMMITTEE OF THE 
SCHOOL OF NURSING 

Mary Beard, Chan-man 
Minnie H. Jordan Annie W. Goodrich, Vice Chairman 

[33] 



FACULTY 

Edmund Ezra Day, B.S., M.A., Ph.D.. LL.D.. 

President of the University 

Cornelius Betten, Ph.D., D.Sc, Dean of the University faculty 

PROFESSORS 

Bessie A. R. Parker, B.S., R.X., Professor of Xursing, Acting Dean of the 

School of Xursing and Acting Director of the Xursing Service. 
Diploma in Xursing, Rhode Island Hospital Training School for Xurses, 
Providence, Rhode Island, 1918; B.S., Teachers College, Columbia 

University. 193" ■ 

May Kennedy. M.A.. R.X.. Professor of Xursing, Associate Director of 

the School of Xursing. 
Diploma in Xursing, St. Joseph's Hospital, Chicago, Illinois, 1907; 
B.S., Teachers College, Columbia Universitv, 1917; M.A.. Universitv 
of Chicago, 1932. 

ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS 

*Verda F. Hickcox, B.S.. R.X.. Associate Professor of Obstetric and 
Gynecological Xursing, Head of Obstetric and Gynecological Xursing 
Service. 
Diploma in Xursing, Presbyterian Hospital School for Xurses, Chicago, 
Illinois, 1916; B.S., Teachers College, Columbia University, 1927. 

Margery T. Overholser, M.A., R.X., Associate Professor of Public 

Health Xursing. 
Diploma in Xursing, Weslev Memorial Hospital School of Xursing, 
Chicago, Illinois, 1922; B. S., Teachers College, Columbia Universitv, 
1927; M.A., ibid, 1944. 

Olive M. Reid, A.B., R.X., Associate Professor of Out-Patient Xursing, 

Head of Out-Patient Xursing Service. 
A.B., Western College for Women, Oxford, Ohio, 1916; Diploma in 
Xursing, Army School of Xursing, Washington, D. C, 1921. 

Agnes Schubert, M.S., R.X., Associate Professor of Pediatric Xursing, 

Head of Pediatric Xursing Service. 
B.S., Xorthwestern University, 1917; Diploma in Xursing, Western 
Reserve Universitv School of Xursing, Cleveland, Ohio, 1926; M.S.. 
Teachers College, Columbia University, 1932. 

Carolyne A. Sprogell, B.S., R.X., Associate Professor of Psychiatric 

Xursing, Director, Psychiatric Xursing Service. 
Diploma m Xursing, St. Lukes Hospital School of Xursing, New York, 
New York, 1924; B.S., Teachers College, Columbia University, 1936. 

*On leave of absence. With American Red Cross. 

[34; 






ASSISTANT PROFESSORS 

Eleanor M. Corrigan, B.S., R.N., Assistant Professor of Psychiatric 

Nursing, Administrative Assistant, Psychiatric Nursing Service. 
Diploma in Nursing, St. Lukes Hospital School of Nursing, New York, 
New York, 1927; B.S., Teachers College, Columbia University, 1940. 

Catherine P. Geuss, M.A., R.N., Assistant Professor of Obstetric and 
Gynecological Nursing, Supervisor, Obstetric and Gynecological Nursing 
Service. 

Diploma in Nursing, Michael Reese Hospital School of Nursing, 

Chicago, Illinois, 1928; B.S., Teachers College, Columbia University, 

1932; M.A., ibid., 1942. 

Mary Elizabeth Klein, B.S., R.N., Assistant Professor of Obstetric and 
Gynecological Nursing, Acting hie ad Obstetric and Gynecological Nursing 
Service. 
Diploma in Nursing, Hahnemann Hospital School of Nursing, Phila- 
delphia, Pennsylvania, 1916; B.S., Teachers College, Columbia Uni- 
versity, 1936. 

Veronica Lyons, B.S., R.N., Assistant Professor of Medical and Surgical 

Nursing, Head of Medical and Surgical Nursing Service. 
Diploma in Nursing, The Johns Hopkins Hospital School of Nursing, 
1927; B.S., Teachers College, Columbia University, 1936. 

Mary T. McDermott, M.A., Assistant Professor of Physical Education, 

Director, Nurses' Residence. 
Diploma, Bouve Boston School of Physical Education, Boston, Massa- 
chusetts, 1916; B.S., New York University, 1930; M.A., ibid., 1932. 

Alice Maud Moffatt, R.N., Assistant Professor of Nursing, Head of 

Private Patients Nursing Service. 
Diploma in Nursing, The New York Hospital School of Nursing, New 
York, New York, 1912. 

Sarah E. Moore, R.N., Assistant Professor of Nursing, Administrative 

Assistant, Day Nursing Service. 
Diploma in Nursing, The New York Hospital School of Nursing, New 
York, New York, 1913- 

Elizabeth Moser, M.A., R.N., Assistant Professor of Nursing, Assistant 

Dean, School of Nursing, and Assistant Director, Nursing Service. 
A.B., BlufFton College, Bluffton, Ohio, 1921; Diploma in Nursing, The 
Johns Hopkins Hospital School of Nursing, Baltimore, Maryland, 1926; 
M.A., Teachers College, Columbia University, 1944. 

Henderika J. Rynbergen, M.S., Assistant Professor of Sciences. 
B.S., Simmons College, 1922; M.S., Cornell University Medical Col- 
lege, 1938. 

[35] 



INSTRUCTORS 

Frances Lucretia Boyle, B.S., R.N., Instructor in Out-Patient Nursing, 

Supervisor, Obstetric Out-Patient Nursing Service. 
Diploma in Nursing, Moses Taylor Hospital, Scranton, Pennsylvania, 
1924. B.S., Teachers College, Columbia University, 1945. 

Mabel Story Crispell, B.S., R.N., Instructor in Medical Nursing, 

Supervisor, Medical Nursing Service. 
Diploma in Nursing, Cornell University-New York Hospital School 
of Nursing, New York, New York, 1942; B.S. in Nursing, Cornell 
University, 1943. 

Helma Fedder, B.S., R.N., Instructor in Surgical Nursing, Supervisor, 

Surgical Nursing Service. 
Diploma in Nursing, Washington University School of Nursing, St. 
Louis, Missouri, 1933; B.S., University of Chicago, 1942. 

Sarah M. Ferguson, R.N., Instructor in Pediatric Nursing, Supervisor, 

Pediatric Nursing Service. 
Diploma in Nursing, Children's Hospital School of Nursing, Boston, 
Massachusetts, 1932. 

Elizabeth Harmon, B.A., R.N., Instructor in Surgical Nursing, Super- 
visor, Surgical Nursing Service. 
B.A., College of Wooster, Wooster, Ohio, 1928; Diploma in Nursing, 
Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, Chicago, Illinois, 1931. 

Martha Woodburn Haslup, R.N., Instructor in Surgical Nursing, 

Supervisor, General Operating Rooms. 
Diploma in Nursing, The Johns Hopkins Hospital School of Nursing, 

Baltimore, Maryland, 1929. 

Thirza Hills, B.S., R.N., Instructor in Medical and Surgical Nursing, 

Supervisor, Medical and Surgical Nursing Service. 
Diploma in Nursing, Presbyterian Hospital School for Nurses, Chicago, 
Illinois, 1925; B.S., Teachers College, Columbia University, 1942. 

Barbara C. Hunt, B.A., B.S., R.N., Instructor in Surgical Nursing, Super- 
visor, Surgical Nursing Service. 
B.A., Elmira College, Elmira, New York, 1940; Diploma in Nursing, 
Cornell University-New York Hospital School of Nursing, New York, 
New York, 1943; B.S. in Nursing, Cornell University, 1943. 

Margaret Joinville, B.S., R.N., Instructor in Psychiatric Nursing, 

Supervisor, Psychiatric Nursing Service. 
Diploma in Nursing, The Army School of Nursing, Washington, D. C, 
1929; B.S., Teachers College, Columbia University, 1941. 

[36] 



Eleanor Lewis, B.A., B.N., R.N., Instructor in Psychiatric Nursing, 

Supervisor, Psychiatric Out-Patient Nursing Service. 
B.A., Radcliffe College, 1925; B.N., Yale University School of Nursing, 
New Haven, Connecticut, 1928. 

Catherine J. McCluskey, R.N., Instructor in Surgical Nursing, Super- 
visor, Surgical Nursing Service. 
Diploma in Nursing, Kings County Hospital School of Nursing, 
Brooklyn, New York, 1942. 

Mabel S. Moehring, B.S., R.N., Instructor in Medical Nursing, Super- 
visor, Medical Nursing Service. 
Diploma in Nursing, University of Minnesota School of Nursing, 
Minneapolis, Minnesota, 1939; B.S., University of Minnesota, 1941. 

M. Eva Poor, A.B., R.N., Instructor in Out-Patient Nursing, Supervisor, 

Out-Patient Nursing Service. 
A.B., Tufts College, Medford, Massachusetts, 1930; Diploma in Nurs- 
ing, The New York Hospital School of Nursing, New York, New 
York, 1939. 

Jean I. Rebentisch, M.A., R.N., Instructor in Pediatric Nursing, Super- 
visor, Pediatric Nursing Service. 
Diploma in Nursing, Methodist Hospital School of Nursing, Brooklyn, 
New York, 1929; B.S., Teachers College, Columbia University, 1940; 
M.A., ibid, 1944. 

Elvin H. Santos, B.S., R.N., Instructor in Psychiatric Nursing, Super- 
visor, Psychiatric Nursing Service. 
Diploma in Nursing, Duke University School of Nursing, Durham, 
North Carolina, 1943; B.S., Catholic University of America, Washing- 
ton, D.C., 1945- 

Thelma L. Stone, B.S., R.N., Instructor in Nursing Arts. 

Diploma in Nursing, The New York Hospital School of Nursing, New 

York, New York, 1936; B.S., Simmons College, 1941. 

Jeanette Walters, B.S., R.N., Instructor in Obstetric and Gynecological 

Nursing, Supervisor, Obstetric and Gynecological Nursing Service. 
Diploma in Nursing, Temple University Hospital School of Nursing, 
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 1923; B.S., New York University, 1944. 



ASSISTANTS 

Burnetta Blatt, R.N., Assistant in Out-Patient Nursing, Supervisor. 

Pediatric Out-Patient Nursing Service 
Diploma in Nursing, The New York Hospital School of Nursing, 
New York, New York, 1934. 

[37] 



Marguerite Bourgeois, M.S., R.N., Assistant in Obstetric and Gyne- 
cological Nursing, Supervisor, Obstetric and Gynecological Nursing 
Service. 

B.S. Massachusetts State College, 1931; Diploma in Nursing, Massa- 
chusetts General Hospital School of Nursing, Boston, Massachusetts, 
1936; M.S., Massachusetts Sate College, 1937. 

Esther H. Deaterly, B.S., R.N., Assistant in Nursing Arts. 
B.S., Pennsylvania State Teachers College, State College, Pennsylvania, 
1928; Diploma in Nursing, The New York Hospital School of Nursing, 
New York, New York, 1937- 

Rita Malloch Genner, R.N., Assistant in Nursing, Supervisor, Nurses' 
Infirmary. 

Diploma in Nursing, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, New 
York, New York, 1920. 

Inez Gnau, R.N., Assistant in Psychiatric Nursing, Supervisor, Psychiatric 

Nursing Service. 
Diploma in Nursing, Jefferson Hospital School of Nursing, Phila- 
delphia, Pennsylvania, 1935- 

Lilian Mead Henderson, B.S., R.N., Assistant in Medical and Surgical 

Nursing, Supervisor, Medical and Surgical Nursing Service. 
Diploma in Nursing, Syracuse University School of Nursing, Syracuse, 
New York, 1930; B.S., Teachers College, Columbia University, 1945- 

Lucy Macdonald Hickey, R.N., Assistant in Surgical Nursing, Assistant 

Supervisor, General Operating Room. 
Diploma in Nursing, The New York Hospital School of Nursing, New 
York, New York, 1927. 

Audrey M. McCluskey, B.S., R.N., Assistant in Nursing Arts. 
Diploma in Nursing, Cornell University-New York Hospital School of 
Nursing, New York, New York, 1944; B.S., Temple University, 
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 1945- 

Florence J. Meigs, R.N., Assistant in Pediatric Nursing, Supervisor, 

Pediatric Nursing Service. 
Diploma in Nursing, Metropolitan Hospital School of Nursing, New 
York, New York, 1932. 

Helen V. Miller, R.N., Assistant in Nursing, Supervisor, Private 

Patients Nursing Service. 
Diploma in Nursing, The Long Island College Hospital School of 
Nursing, Brooklyn, New York, 1932. 

Mary L. Sillcox, R.N., Assistant in Obstetric and Gynecological Nursing, 

Supervisor, Obstetric and Gynecological Nursing Service. 
Diploma in Nursing, Faxton Hospital School of Nursing, Utica, New 
York, 1916. 

[38] 



Margery E. Smith, B.S., Assistant in Physical Education. 
B.S., Russell Sage College, Troy, New York, 1945. 

Mildred M. Steigerwalt, B.S., R.N., Assistant in Pediatric Nursing, 

Supervisor, Pediatric Nursing Service. 
Diploma in Nursing, Cornell University-New York Hospital School 
of Nursing, New York, New York, 1944; B.S., in Nursing, Cornell 
University, 1944. 

Mary H. Swanwick, B.S., R.N., Assistant in Medical and Surgical 

Nursing, Supervisor, Medical and Surgical Nursing Service. 
Diploma in Nursing, St. Vincent's Hospital School of Nursing, New 
York, 1941; B.S., St. John's University, Brooklyn, New York, 1945- 

Ruth Woodfall, R.N., Assistant in Nursing, Supervisor, Pediatric 

Nursing Service. 
Diploma in Nursing, The Children's Hospital School of Nursing, 
Boston, Massachusetts, 1932. 

Genevieve Jarosz Young, M.A., Assistant in Sciences. 

B.A., Hunter College, 1939; M.A., Teachers College, Columbia 

University, 1944. 

One to be appointed. 



[39 



MEMBERS OF THE FACULTY OF CORNELL 

UNIVERSITY MEDICAL COLLEGE WHO 

ARE ALSO MEMBERS OF THE 

FACULTY OF THE SCHOOL 

OF NURSING 

Joseph C. Hinsey, Ph.D Dean — Professor of Anatomy 

David P. Barr, M.D Professor of Medicine 

McKeen Cattell, M.D Professor of Pharmacology 

Oskar Diethelm, M.D Professor of Psychiatry 

Edwin J. Doty, M.D Assistant Professor of Psychiatry 

Eugene F. DuBois, M.D Professor of Physiology 

Vincent Du Vigneaud, Ph.D Professor of Biochemistry 

Warner S. Hammond, Ph.D Assistant Professor of Anatomy 

Edward J. Hehre, M.D Assistant Professor, Bacteriology and 

Immunology 
George J. Heuer, M.D Professor of Surgery 

Samuel Z. Levine, M.D Professor of Pediatrics 

John McLeod, Ph.D Instructor of Physiology 

James M. Neill, Ph.D. Professor of Bacteriology and Immunology 

Wilson G. Smillie, M.D. , Professor of Public Health and Preventive Medicine 

Henricus J. Stander, M.D. . . . Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology 

Ralph G. Stillman, M.D Assistant Professor of Medicine 

William H. Summerson, Ph.D. Assistant Professor of Biochemistry 

Chester L. Yntema, Ph.D Assistant Professor of Anatomy 

LECTURERS 

Donald A. Clarke, B.S Pharmacology 

Johanna Lee, B.A Chemistry 

Department of Biochemistry 
Cornell University Medical College 

W. R. Redden, M.D Emergency Nursing 

American Red Cross, New York Chapter 

Mary T. Whitley, Ph.D Child Psychology 

HEALTH SERVICE 

Frances Lansdown, M.D. Edwin Doty, M.D. 

Physician in Chief Consulting Psychiatrist 

[40] 



MEMBERS OF OTHER DEPARTMENTS AND 
ORGANIZATIONS PARTICIPATING IN 
THE NURSING PROGRAM 

NUTRITION DEPARTMENT 

S. Margaret Gillam, M.A., Director Elizabeth Richmond, B.S. 
Blanche Bohach, M.S. Marjorie Skinner, B.S. 

Anne Craver, B.S. Jeanne Tillotson, B.S. 

Eleanor Johnson, B.S. Violet Tolley, B.S. 

Susan Paige, B.S. Phyllis Traynor, B.S. 

Ruth Warye, B.S. 

OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY DEPARTMENT, 
PAYNE WHITNEY CLINIC 

Elizabeth Spargo, Director 

PHYSICAL THERAPY DEPARTMENT, 
PAYNE WHITNEY CLINIC 

Grace Brindle, Director 

SOCIAL SERVICE DEPARTMENTS 

Theodate H. Soule, M.A., Director, Main Hospital 
Mrs. Virginia T. Kinzel, Director, Woman s Clinic 
Mrs. Melly Simon, Director, 'Payne Whitney Clinic 

VISITING NURSE SERVICE OF NEW YORK 
Marion Randall, B.S., R.N., Director 

COMMUNITY SERVICE SOCIETY 

Department of Educational Nursing 
Alta E. Dines, M.A., L.H.D., R.N., Director 

[41] 



THE SOCIETY OF THE NEW YORK HOSPITAL 

Langdon P. Marvin President, Board of Governors 

Murray Sargent Director 

NURSING SERVICE 

STAFF OF ADMINISTRATION 

Bessie A. R. Parker Acting Dean, School of Nursing 

Acting Director, Nursing Service 

Elizabeth Moser Assistant Dean, School of Nursing 

Assistant Director, Nursing Service 

Charlotte S. Argabrite Night Administrative Assistant 

Sarah E. Moore Day Administrative Assistant 

Vanda Summers Evening Administrative Assistant 

(See Faculty for Heads of Clinical Nursing Services) 

NURSING SERVICE COMMITTEE 

Bessie A. R. Parker, Chairman Sarah E. Moore 

Charlotte S. Argabrite Elizabeth Moser 

May Kennedy Olive M. Reid 

Mary S. Klein Agnes Schubert 

Veronica Lyons Carolyne A. Sprogell 

Alice M. Moffatt Thelma Stone 

Vanda Summers 

SUPERVISORS 

Estelle Luba, Assistant Supervisor, Operating Rooms 
Madeleine O'Brien, Private Patients Service 

(Other Supervisors listed under Faculty) 

HEAD NURSES 
Medical and Surgical Services 

Ruth Brockman Betty Merrill 

Mary Capuano Mary McNeer 

Elizabeth Curtin Hazel Poole 

Leone Delelys Agnes Rafferty 

Barbara Derr Alverna Skoog 

Doris Dieterle Stella Smariga 

Rosemary Farmer Alberta Smith 

Antoinette Fedorowicz Elsa Sprietzer 

Sara Gericke Edna Stratton 

Dorothy Halliday Doris Sweeney 

Rhoda Hines Crescentia Troy 

Anne Hughes Salome Yauniskas 

Priscilla MacLean Katherine Zorn 

[42] 



Out- Pat tent Service 



Evelyn Clark 
Virginia Codington 
Elizabeth Geiger 
Jean Haseltine 

WlLETTA HAYNES 

Lucille Lambert 
Evelyn Liddle 



Marjorie Liu 
Delia Meachard 
Eleanor Mills 
Elsa Nussbaumer 
Margaret Rouchleau 
luella uhrhane 
Irene Yurchukonis 



Payne Whitney Psychiatric Service 



Virginia Alcott 
Elin Friberg 
Elizabeth Gardner 
Agnes Gent 
Gertrude Goodman 
Grace Lundgren 
Beatrice McKee 



Dorothy Ranson 
Margaret Swatska 
Olga Trupo 
Jessie Weaver 
Arlene Wilson 
Faye Wise 



Alice Don Dero 
Margaret Hodges 



Pediatric Service 



Grace Navin 
Kathleen Nestor 



Lois Cantrell 
Faye Dumphy 
Lydia Hansen 
Dorothea James 



Private and Semi-Private Services 



Grace Coates Kurtz 
Lois Tait Mandick 

Ane Nielsen 
Genevieve Swatski 



Obstetrical and Gynecological Service 



Alma Bott 
Elizabeth Calder 
Anna Colwell 
Agnes Connor 
Clara Hawtin 
Anna Klubko 
Violet Knox 



Mary Grace Linley 
Lucy Morgester 
Rose Novak 
Rose Valpreda 
Lucille White 
Kathleen Young 



[43 



[& 



1<T)^«> 



CORNELL UNIVERSITY 



OFFICIAL PUBLICATION 



AUGUST 1, 1946 






Cornell University — New York Hospital 

School of Nuning 




ANNOUNCEMENT FOR 
1946-1947 SESSIONS 



TERM DATES 1946-1947 

September Classes February Classes* 

Sept. 30, 1946 - Jan. 19, 1947 

Jan. 20, 1947 - May 11, 1947 

May 12, 1947 - Sept. 28, 1947 

Sept. 29, 1947 - Jan. 18, 1948 

•Note: The admission of classes in February has been discontinued. 
Last class admitted in 1945. 



Oct. 


28, 


1946 


- Feb. 


16, 


1947 


Feb. 


17, 


1947 


-June 


8, 


1947 


June 


9, 


1947 


- Oct. 


26, 


1947 


Oct. 


27, 


1947 


- Feb. 


15, 


1948 



CORNELL UNIVERSITY OFFICIAL PUBLICATION 

PUBLISHED BY CORNELL UNIVERSITY AT ITHACA, NEW YORK 
Monthly in September, October, and November. Semimonthly Decem- 
ber to August inclusive. Volume 38. August 1, 1946. Number 3. 
Entered as second-class matter, December 14, 1916, at the post office 
at Ithaca, New York, under the act of August 24, 1912. 



CORNELL UNIVERSITY 
OFFICIAL PUBLICATION 



Cornell University— New York Hospital 

School of Nursing 

1946-1947 

525 FAST 68TH STREET, NEW YORK 21, N. Y. 



CONTENTS 

Calendar 2 

Faculty and Staff 5 

History 12 

Opportunities in the Field of Nursing 13 

Facilities for Instruction 14 

Aim of the School 16 

Requirements for Admission and Graduation 16 

Requirements for Admission 16 

Application for Admission 17 

Requirements for Promotion and Graduation .18 

Advanced Standing 18 

Degree and Diploma 18 

State Registration 19 

Expenses 19 

Fees and Expenses 19 

Maintenance 20 

Financial Aid 20 

Health Service 20 

Vacations and Absences 21 

Residence and Student and Alumnae Activities 21 

Residence Facilities 21 

Recreational Facilities 21 

School Government 22 

Alumnae Association 22 

General Plan of Instruction 23 

Description of Courses 26 



CALENDAR 



Sept. 


25 


Wednesday 


Sept. 


30 


Monday 


Oct. 


12 


Saturday 


Nov. 


28 


Thursday 


Dec. 


24 


Tuesday 


Dec. 


25 


Wednesday 


1947 






Jan. 


1 


Wednesday 


Feb. 


12 


Wednesday 


Feb. 


22 


Saturday 


Feb. 


27 


Thursday 


May 


30 


Friday 


July 


4 


Friday 


Sept. 


1 


Monday 


Sept. 


27 


Saturday 


Sept. 


29 


Monday 


Oct. 


13 


Monday 


Nov. 


27 


Thursday 


Dec. 


24 


Wednesday 


Dec. 


25 


Thursday 


1948 






Jan. 


1 


Thursday 


Feb. 


12 


Thursday 


Feb. 


22 


Monday 


Feb. 


25 


Wednesday 


May 


31 


Monday 


July 


5 


Monday 



Commencement, September Class 

Registration of freshmen students 

Columbus Day: holiday (except for freshmen) ; 

Thanksgiving Day: a holiday 

Christmas recess for freshmen students begins 

Christmas Day: a holiday 

New Year's Day: a holiday. Last day of Christ- 
mas recess for freshmen ends 
Lincoln's Birthday: a holiday 
Washington's Birthday: a holiday 
Commencement, February class 
Memorial Day: a holiday 
Independence Day: a holiday 
Labor Day: a holiday 
Registration of freshmen students 
Commencement, September class 
Columbus Day: holiday (except for freshmen) 
Thanksgiving Day: a holiday 
Christmas recess for freshmen students begins ,; 
Christmas Day: a holiday 

New Year's Day: a holiday. Last day of Christ- 
mas recess for freshmen 
Lincoln's Birthday: a holiday 
Washington's Birthday: a holiday 
Commencement, February class 
Memorial Day: a holiday 
Independence Day: a holiday 



JOINT ADMINISTRATIVE BOARD 

EDMUND EZRA DAY, Chairman 

EDMUND EZRA DAY, President of the „ , , „ 

' . . ) Board of 1 rustees 

University r f 

NEAL DOW BECKER ( „ ° . 

| Cornell University 

. JOSEPH P. RIPLEY ' 

WILLIAM JACKSON, President Board of Governors 

HENRY S. STURGIS, Treasurer I of 

LANGDON P. MARVIN ) Th e New York Hospital 

JOHN W. DAVIS 

ADMINISTRATION 

|k EDMUND EZRA DAY President of the University 

GEORGE HOLLAND SABINE Vice President of the University 

VIRGINIA M. DUNBAR Dean 

BESSIE A. R. PARKER Associate Dean 

MAY KENNEDY* Associate Director 

VERONICA LYONS** Assistant Dean 

♦Fall Term 
** Appointment effective February 1, 1947. On leave in fall term 



;; 



ASSISTANTS IN ADMINISTRATION 

FLORA J. BERGSTROM Librarian 

DOROTHY JACOBUS Registrar 

MARY ALICE SLACK Assistant Registrar 

MARGARET E. VOGEL Secretary 

HELENE JAMIESON JORDAN Director of Public Information 



EXECUTIVE FACULTY 

EDMUND EZRA DAY, Chairman 
AGNES SCHUBERT, Secretary 
VIRGINIA M. DUNBAR SARAH E. MOORE 

JOSEPH C. HINSEY ELIZABETH MOSER 

VERDA HICKCOX MARGERY T. OVERHOLSER 

MAY KENNEDY BESSIE A. R. PARKER 

MARY E. KLEIN OLIVE REID 

VERONICA LYONS CAROLYNE A. SPROGELL 

ALICE M. MOFFATT HENRICUS J. STANDER 

STANDING COMMITTEES 

Committee on Admissions Mary E. Klein, Chairman 

Committee on Curriculum Virginia M. Dunbar, Chairman 

Committee on Nursing Principles 

and Practices H. Rosalind MacLean, Chairman 

Committees on Promotion 

First year students Henderika Rynbergen, Chairman 

Second year students Jean Rebentisch, Chairman 

Third year students Eleanor Corrigan, Chairman 

Library Committee May Kennedy, Chairman 

Committee on Records Veronica Lyons, Chairman 

Committee on Student and 

Staff Health Carolyne A. Sprogell, Chairman 

Committee on Scholarship Aid and 

Student Loan Olive Reid, Chairman I d 

Committee on Affiliating Students Frances Boyle, Chairman 

Committee on Graduate Courses Verda F. Hickcox, Chairman 

Committee on Student Affairs Catherine P. Geuss, Chairman '.; 

Alii 

rial 






FACULTY 

EDMUND EZRA DAY, Ph.D., LI..D., President of the University 

EMERJ rUS PROFESSOR 
H VRRIET FROST, Professor of Public Health and Oul Patient Nursing 

PROFESSORS 

VIRGINIA M. DUNBAR, A.B., M.A., R.N., Professor of Nursing, Dean of the School 
of Nursing, and Director of the Nursing Service. (A.B., Mount Holyoke College, South 
Hadley, Massachusetts, 1919; Diploma in Nursing, Johns Hopkins Hospital School 
of Nursing, Baltimore, Maryland, 1923; M.A., Teachers College, Columbia University, 
1930. Diploma, Bedford College and Florence Nightingale International Foundation, 
London, England, 1936.) 

BESSIE A. R. PARKER, B.S., R.N., Professor of Nursing, Associate Dean of the 
School of Nursing, and Associate Director of Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, 
, Rhode Island Hospital Training School for Nurses, Providence, Rhode Island, 1918; 
B.S., Teachers College, Columbia University, 1937.) 

•MAY KENNEDY, M.A., R.N., Professor of Nursing, Associate Director of the School 
. of Nursing. (Diploma in Nursing, St. Joseph's Hospital, Chicago, Illinois, 1907; B.S. 
Teachers College, Columbia University, 1917; M.A., University of Chicago, Chicago, 
Illinois, 1932.) 

ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS 

VERDA F. HICKCOX, B.S., R.N., Associate Professor of Obstetric and Gynecological 
< Nursing, Head of Obstetric and Gynecological Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, 
Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, Chicago, Illinois, 1916; B.S. Teachers Col- 
lege, Columbia University, 1927.) 

••VERONICA LYONS, B.S., R.N., Assistant Dean and Associate Professor of Nurs- 
ing. (Diploma in Nursing, The Johns Hopkins Hospital School of Nursing, 1927; 
; B.S., Teachers College, Columbia University, 1936.) 

ELIZABETH MOSER, M.A., R.N., Associate Professor of Nursing and Assistant 
I' Director of Nursing Service. (A.B., Bluffton College, Bluffton, Ohio, 1921; Diploma 
in Nursing, The Johns Hopkins Hospital School of Nursing, Baltimore, Maryland, 
1926; M.A., Teachers College, Columbia University, 1944.) 

MARGERY T. OVERHOLSER, M.A., R.N., Associate Professor of Public Health 
Nursing and Director of Public Health Nursing. (Diploma in Nursing, Wesley Memo- 
rial Hospital School of Nursing, Chicago, Illinois, 1922; B.S., Teachers College 
Columbia University, 1927; M.A., ibid, 1911.) 



♦Fall term 
••Spring term. On leave for study in fall term. 



OLIVE M. REID, A.B., R.N., Associate Professor of Out-Patient Nursing, Head of 
Out-Patient Nursing Service. (A.B., Western College for Women, Oxford, Ohio, 1916; 
Diploma in Nursing, Army School of Nursing, Washington, D. C, 1921.) 
AGNES SCHUBERT, M.S., R.N., Associate Professor of Pediatric Nursing, Head of 
the Pediatric Nursing Service. (B.S., Northwestern University, 1917; Diploma in 
Nursing, Western Reserve University School of Nursing, Cleveland, Ohio, 1926; 
M.S., Teachers College, Columbia University, 1932.) 

CAROLYNE A. SPROGELL, B.S., R.N., Associate Professor of Psychiatric Nursing, 
Director, Psychiatric Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, St. Lukes Hospital 
School of Nursing, New York, New York, 1924; B.S., Teachers College, Columbia 
University, 1936.) 

ASSISTANT PROFESSORS 
ELEANOR M. CORRIGAN, B.S., R.N., Assistant Professor of Psychiatric Nursing, 
Administrative Assistant, Psychiatric Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, St. Lukes 
Hospital School of Nursing, New York, New York, 1927; B.S., Teachers College, 
Columbia University, 1940.) 

CATHERINE P. GEUSS, M.A., R.N., Assistant Professor of Obstetric and Gyneco- 
logical Nursing, Supervisor, Obstetric and Gynecological Nursing Service. (Diploma 
in Nursing, Michael Reese Hospital School of Nursing, Chicago, Illinois, 1928; B.S., 
Teachers College, Columbia University, 1932; M.A., ibid., 1942.) 

MARY ELIZABETH KLEIN, B.S., R.N., Assistant Professor of Medical and Surgical 
Nursing, Head of Medical and Surgical Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Hahnemann 
Hospital School of Nursing, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 1916; B.S., Teachers College, 
Columbia University, 1936.) 

MARY T. McDERMOTT, M.A., Assistant Professor of Physical Education, Director, 
Nurses' Residence. (Diploma, Bouve Boston School of Physical Education, Boston, 
Massachusetts, 1916; B.S., New York University, 1930; M.A., ibid., 1932.) 
ALICE MAUD MOFFATT, R.N., Assistant Professor of Nursing, Head of Private 
Patients Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, The New York Hospital School of 
Nursing, New York, New York, 1912.) 

SARAH E. MOORE, R.N., Assistant Professor of Nursing, Administrative Assistant, 
Day Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, The New York Hospital School of Nurs- 
ing, New York, New York, 1913.) 

HENDERIKA J. RYNBERGEN, M.S., Assistant Professor of Sciences. (B.S., Simmons 
College, 1922; M.S., Cornell University Medical College, 1938.) 

INSTRUCTORS 
FRANCES LUCRETIA BOYLE, B.S., R.N., Instructor in Out-Patient Nursing, 
Supervisor, Obstetric Out-Patient Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Moses Tay- 
lor Hospital, Scranton, Pennsylvania, 1924, B.S., Teachers College, Columbia Uni- 
versity, 1945.) 

VIRGINIA DANIELS, B.S., R.N., Instructor in Medical and Surgical Nursing, Super- 
visor, Medical and Surgical Nursing Service. (B.S., Teachers College, Columbia Uni- 
versity, New York, New York, 1937; Diploma in Nursing, Presbyterian Hospital 
School of Nursing, Chicago, Illinois, 1930.) 



LOIS A. DUNN, B.A., M.N., R.N., Instructor in Medical Nursing. (B.A., Wellesley 
College, Wellesley, Massachusetts, 1932; M.N., Vale University, New Haven, Con- 
necticut, 1943.) 

HELMA FEDDER, B.S., R.N., Instructor in Surgical Nursing, Supervisor Surgical 
Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Washington University School of Nursing, 
St. Louis, Missouri, 1933; B.S., University of Chicago, 1912.) 

♦SARAH M. FERGUSON, R.N., Instructor in Pediatric Nursing, Supervisor, Pedi- 
atric Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Children's Hospital School of Nursing, 
Boston, Massachusetts, 1932.) 

LILLIAN MEAD HENDERSON, B.S., R.N., Instructor in Medical and Surgical 
Nursings Supervisor Medical and Surgical Nursing Senjice. (Diploma in Nursing, 
Syracuse University School of Nursing, Syracuse, New York, 1930; B.S., Teachers 
College, Columbia University, 1945.) 

ELIZABETH HARMON, B.A., R.N., Instructor in Medical and Surgical Nursing, 
Assistant Head of Medical and Surgical Nursing Service. (B.A., College of Wooster, 
Wooster, Ohio, 1928; Diploma in Nursing, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 
Chicago, Illinois, 1931.) 

MARTHA WOODBURN HASLUP, R.N., Instructor in Surgical Nursing, Supervisor, 
General Operating Rooms. (Diploma in Nursing, The Johns Hopkins Hospital School 
of Nursing, Baltimore, Maryland, 1929.) 

THIRZA HILLS, B.S., R.N., Instructor in Medical and Surgical Nursing, Supervisor, 
Medical and Surgical Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Presbyterian Hospital 
School for Nurses, Chicago, Illinois, 1925; B.S., Teachers College, Columbia Uni- 
versity, 1942.) 

MARGARET JOINVILLE, B.S., R.N., Instructor in Psychiatric Nursing, Supervisor, 
Psychiatric Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, The Army School of Nursing, 
Washington, D. C, 1929; B.S., Teachers College, Columbia University, 1941.) 

HARRIET KEMPER, B.S., R.N., Instructor in Medical Nursing. (Diploma in Nurs- 
ing, Washington University, St. Louis, Missouri, 1942; B.S., Western Reserve Uni- 
versity, Cleveland, Ohio, 1946.) 

CATHERINE J. McCLUSKEY, B.S., R.N., Instructor in Surgical Nursing. (Diploma 
in Nursing, Kings County Hospital School of Nursing, Brooklyn, New York, 1942; 
B.S., Teachers College, Columbia University, 1946.) 

H. ROSALIND MacLEAN, B.A., M.A., R.N., Instructor in Nursing Arts. (B.A., 
Adelphi College, Garden City, L. L, New York, 1932; M.A., Columbia University, 
Teachers College, 1933; Diploma in Nursing, Cornell University-New York Hospital 
School of Nursing, 1937.) 

M. EVA POOR, A.B., R.N., Instructor in Out-Patient Nursing, Supervisor, Out- 
patient Nursing Service. (A.B., Tufts College, Medford, Massachusetts, 1930; Diploma 
in Nursing, The New York Hospital School of Nursing, New York, New York, 1939.) 

J I AN I. REBENTISCH, M.A., R.N., Instructor in Pediatric Nursing, Supervisor, 
Pediatric Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Methodist Hospital School of Nurs- 
ing, Brooklyn, New York, 1929; B.S., Teachers College, Columbia University, 1940; 
M.A., ibid., 1944.) 



*On leave for study during fall term. 



ELVIN H. SANTOS, B.S., R.N., Instructor in Psychiatric Nursing, Supervisor, Psy- 
chiatric Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Duke University School of Nursing, 
Durham, North Carolina, 1943; B.S., Catholic University of America, Washington, 
D. C, 1945.) 

JEANETTE WALTERS, B.S., R.N., Instructor in Obstetric and Gynecological Nurs- 
ing, Supervisor, Obstetric and Gynecological Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, 
Temple University Hospital School of Nursing, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 1923; 
B.S., New York University, 1944.) 

ASSISTANTS 
BURNETTA BLATT, R.N., Assistant in Out-Patient Nursing, Supervisor, Pediatric 
Out-Patient Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, The New York Hospital School 
of Nursing, New York, New York, 1934.) 

JEAN H. BRADFORD, R.N., Assistant in Obstetric and Gynecological Nursing. 
(Diploma in Nursing, Memorial Hospital, Houston, Texas, 1939.) 

RITA MALLOCH GENNER, R.N., Assistant in Nursing, Supervisor, Nurses' In- 
firmary. (Diploma in Nursing, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, New York, 
New York, 1920.) 

INEZ GNAU, R.N., Assistant in Psychiatric Nursing, Supervisor, Psychiatric Nursing 
Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Jefferson Hospital School of Nursing, Philadelphia, 
Pennsylvania, 1935.) 

LUCY MacDONALD HICKEY, R.N., Assistant in Surgical Nursing, Assistant Super- 
visor, General Operating Room. (Diploma in Nursing, The New York Hospital 
School of Nursing, New York, New York, 1927.) 

DORIS JEAN IBA, B.S., Assistant in Sciences. (B.S., University of Missouri, Columbia, 
Missouri, 1944.) 

AUDREY M. McCLUSKEY, B.S., R.N., Assistant in Nursing Arts. (Diploma in Nurs- 
ing, Cornell University-New York Hospital School of Nursing, New York, New York, 
1944; B.S., Temple University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 1945.) 

HELEN V. MILLER, R.N., Assistant in Nursing, Supervisor, Private Patients Nurs- 
ing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, The Long Island College Hospital School of Nurs- 
ing, Brooklyn, New York, 1932.) 

MARY McNEER, R.N., Assistant Medical and Surgical Nursing Service Supervisor. 
(Diploma in Nursing, Jewish Hospital School of Nursing, Philadelphia, Pennsyl- 
vania, 1936.) 

HELEN RATUSHNY, B.S., R.N., Assistant in Psychiatric Nursing. (Diploma in 
Nursing, Cornell University-New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1944; B.S. in 
Nursing, Cornell University-New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1944.) 

MARY L. SILLCOX, R.N., Assistant in Obstetric and Gynecological Nursing, Super- 
visor, Obstetric and Gynecological Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Faxton 
Hospital School of Nursing, Utica, New York, 1916.) 

HELEN M. SCHIRMER, B.A., M.A., Assistant in Physical Education. (B.A., Hunter 
College, New York, 1944; M.A., Teachers College, Columbia University, 1946.) 

MILDRED M. STEIGERWALT, B.S., R.N., Assistant in Pediatric Nursing, Super- 
visor, Pediatric Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Cornell University-New York 



Hospital School of Nursing, New York, New York, 1944; B.S. in Nursing, Cornell 
University, 1911.) 

MARY H. SWANWICK, B.S., R.N., Assistant in Medical and Surgical Nursing, 
Supervisor, Medical and Surgical Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, St. Vincent's 
Hospital School of Nursing, New York, New York, 1911; B.S., St. John's University, 
Brooklyn, New York, 1945.) 

RUTH VANDENBERG THOMAS, B.S., R.N., Assistant in Obstetric and Gyneco- 
logical Nursing. (Diploma in Nursing, Blodgett Memorial Hospital School of Nurs- 
ing, Grand Rapids, Michigan, 1939; B.S., Teachers College, Columhia University, 
1944.) 

RUTH WOODFALL, R.N., Assistant in Pediatric Nursing, Supervisor, Pediatric 
Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, The Children's Hospital School of Nursing, 
Boston, Massachusetts, 1932.) 



MEMBERS OF THE FACULTY OF 

CORNELL UNIVERSITY MEDICAL COLLEGE 

WHO ARE ALSO MEMBERS OF THE FACULTY 

OF THE SCHOOL OF NURSING 

JOSEPH C. HINSEY, Ph.D., Dean and Professor of Anatomy 

DAVID P. BARR, M.D., Professor of Medicine 

McKEEN CATTELL, M.D., Professor of Pharmacologx 

OSKAR DIETHELM, M.D., Professor of Psychiatry 

EDWIN J. DOTY, M.D., Assistant Professor of Psychiatry 

EUGENE F. DuBOIS, M.D., Professor of Physiology 

VINCENT DuVIGNEAUD, Ph.D., Professor of Biochemistry 

WARNER S. HAMMOND, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Anatomy 

EDWARD J. HEHRE, M.D., Assistant Professor, Bacteriology and Immunology 

GEORGE J. HEUER, M.D., Professor of Surgery 

SAMUEL Z. LEVINE, M.D., Professor of Pediatrics 

JOHN McLEOD, Ph.D., Instructor in Physiology 

JAMES M. NEILL, Ph.D., Professor of Bacteriology and Immunology 

WILSON G. SMILLIE, M.D., Professor of Public Health and Preventive Medicine 

HENRICUS J. STANDER, M.D., Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology 

RALPH G. STILLMAN, M.D., Assistant Professor of Medicine 

WILLIAM H. SUMMERSON, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Biochemistry 

LECTURES 
DONALD A. CLARKE, B.S. Pharmacology 

JOHANNA LEE, B.A. Chemistry 

Department of Biochemistry 

Cornell University Medical College 
W. R. REDDEN, M.D. Emergency Nursing 

American Red Cross, New York Chapter 
MARY T. WHITLEY, Ph.D. Child Psychology 



HEALTH SERVICE 

FRANCES LANSDOWN, M.D. EDWIN DOTY, M.D. 

Physician in Chief Consulting Psychiatrist 

CIATED WITH THE FACULTY 
NUTRITION DEPARTMENT 
LOUISE STEPHENSON, B.S., M.S., Director 

mildred babcock, b.s. susan paige, b.s. 

aurora commarta, b.s. elizabeth richmond, b.s 

meredith jones marjorie skinner, b.s. 

minna McCarthy, b.s. jeanne tillotson, b.s. 

mary ellis matthews, b.s. ruth warye, b.s. 

PAYNE WHITNEY CLINIC 
ELIZABETH SPARGO, Director, Occupational Therapy Dept. 
GRACE BRUNDLE, Director Physical Therapy Dept. 

SOCIAL SERVICE DEPARTMENTS 

THEODATE H. SOULE, M.A., Director Main Hospital 
MRS. VIRGINIA T. KINZEL, Director, Woman's Clinic 
MRS. MELLY SIMON, Director, Payne Whitney Clinic 

VISITING NURSE SERVICE OF NEW YORK 

MARION RANDALL, B.S., R.N., Director 

COMMUNITY SERVICE SOCIETY 
ALTA E. DINES, M.A., L.H.D., R.N., Director, Department of Educational Nursing 



THE SOCIETY OF 
THE NEW YORK HOSPITAL 

WILLIAM HARDING JACKSON, President, Board of Governors 
MURRAY SARGENT, Director 

NURSING SERVICE STAFF OF ADMINISTRATION 

VIRGINIA M. DUNBAR, Dean of the School of Nursing, Director of the Nursing 

Service 
BESSIE A. R. PARKER, Associate Dean of the School of Nursing, Associate Director 

of the Nursing Service 
ELIZABETH MOSER, Assistant Director of the Nursing Service 
CHARLOTTE S. ARGABRITE, Night Administrative Assistant 
SARAH E. MOORE, Day Administrative Assistant 
VANDA SUMMERS, Evening Administrative Assistant 

(See Faculty for Heads of Clinical Nursing Services) 

10 



NURSING SERVICE COMMITTEE 



BESSIE A. R. PARKER, Chairman 
VIRGINIA M. DUNBAR 
CHARLOTTES. ARGABR] I I 
VERDA HICKCOX 
MAY KENNEDY 
MARY E. KLEIN- 
VERONICA LYONs 
H.ROSALIND Mac LI AN 



ALICE M. MOIFATT 
SARAH E. MOORE 
1 LIZABE1 H MOM R 

()I I\ 1 M. kill) 
\(.\I s M 111 BERT 
( AROLYXE A. SPROG] II 

\ WD \ M.MM1 Us 



SUPERVISORS 

Ll ( >NE DELELYS, Assistant Supervisor, Operating Room 
INI./ MILLINS, Private Patients Service 
(Other Supervisors listed under Faculty) 



Medicine & Surgery 

CHRISTINE BILTZ 
RLTH BROCKMAX 
MARY CAPUANO 
DORIS CLAUSER 
BARBARA CULLINGTON 
ELIZABETH CURTIN 
BARBARA DERR 
DORIS DIETERLE 
ROSEMARY FARMER 
MARGARET GRIMM 
RHODA HINTS 
DORIS PLACE 
HAZEL POOLE 
AGNES RAFFERTY 
ROSALIE STURZ RAL 
ALVERNA SKOOG 
STELLA SMARIGA 
BEATRICE SPECTOR 
ELSA SPREITZER 
EDNA STRATTON 
DORIS SWEENEY 
CRESCENTIA TROY 
SALOME YAUNISKAS 
KATHERINE ZORN 

Pediatrics 

ALICE DON DERO 
MARGARET HODGES 
KATHLEEN NESTOR 



HEAD NURSES 

Obstetrics and Gynecology 
ALMA BOTT 
ELIZABETH CALDER 
ANNA COLWELL 
AGNES CONNER 
HENRIETTA EPPINK 
HARRIET ESTABROOK 
CLARA HAW TIN- 
MARY GRACE HOPKINS 
VIOLET KNOX 
ESTHER LIPTON 
VERONICA MAT IS 
LUCY MORGESTER 
MARGARET SKINNER 
LUCILLE WHITE 
KATHLEEN YOUNG 
Payne Whitney- 
Clinic — Psxchiatrx 
LUCILLE COLYIN 
ELIN FRIBERG 
ELIZABETH GARDNER 
GERTRUDE GOODMAN 
GRACE LUNDGREN 
BEATRICE McKEE 
ELIZABETH A. MELLADY 
ESTHER MORRISON- 
MARY NUTTING 
MARGARET SWATSKA 
JESSIE WEAVER 
ARLENE WILSON 
FAYE WISE 



Out-Patient Department 

EVELYN CLARK 
ELIZABETH GEIGER 
EVELYN GOLDEN 
JEAN HASELTINE 
LUCILLE LAMBER I 
EVELYN LIDDLE 
MARJORIE LIU 
ILENE LONG 
DELL A MEACHARD 
ELEANOR MILLS 
ELSA NUSSBAUMER 
FLORENCE ORLOPP 
ELISE RIGGS 
KATHRYN ROHRBAUGH 
MARGARET ROUCHLEAl 
IRENE YURCHUKONIS 

Private Patients 

LOIS CANTRELL 
FAYE DUNPHY 
LYDIA HANSEN 
Rl'TH LEARN 
EILEEN LOUGHNEY 
ANE NIELSON 
ELIZABETH RASELY 
GENEVIEVE SWATSKI 



HISTORY 

CORNELL University-New York Hospital School of Nursing has 
the resources of two great institutions, each of which has a long 
history and a notable record of achievement in the fields of education 
and public welfare. 

Cornell University received its first endowment from the Federal 
Government's Educational Land Grant in 1862. The appropriation 
under the Morrill Act was to endow a college "where the leading object 
shall be . . .to teach such branches of learning as are related to agricul- 
ture and the mechanical arts." This was the beginning of a remarkable 
system of higher education. It, however, received its greatest impetus 
through the vision and generosity of Ezra Cornell, who, under the 
influence of Andrew D. White, his colleague and later the first presi- 
dent, determined the form of the new University. In 1864 an agreement 
was reached with the legislature of New York State which resulted in 
the founding of "a University of a new type. . .an institution where 
any person can find instruction in any study." This combination of 
federal, state, and private interests and resources is unique. It gives 
strength to the organization, broadens the aims and the policies of the 
University, and extends the influence of its educational ideals. 

One field of service after another has found preparation for its 
workers within this great University. In June, 1927, an association be- 
tween the Cornell University Medical College and the New York 
Hospital was completed, cementing the relationship between the two 
and resulting in 1932 in their joint occupancy of the newly constructed 
buildings of the New York Hospital-Cornell University Medical Cen- 
ter on the East River between 68th and 71st Streets. Preparation for 
nursing was first brought under the auspices of the University in July, 
1942, when, by agreement between the Trustees of the University and 
the Governors of the New York Hospital, the School of Nursing, long 
conducted by The Society of the New York Hospital, was made an 
autonomous school in the University. 

The New York Hospital School of Nursing had been organized in 
1877 as an integral part of the New York Hospital, the second oldest 
hospital in America maintained by private endowment. George the 
Third of England granted the hospital its charter of incorporation on 
June 13, 1771, under the title of the Society of the Hospital in the 
City of New York in America. This title was changed in 1810 to the 
present title of The Society of the New York Hospital. 

12 






i 



The New York Hospital lias the distinction of being the first insti- 
tution in America devoted to the care of the sick which gave organized 
instruction to its nursing personnel. It was in 1799 that Dr. Valentine 
Seaman, a scholar and prominent physician, organized a series of 
lectures combined with a course of practical instruction on the wards. 
This cannot be considered the beginning of the school, but it is 
evidence of the long-standing interest of the Hospital in the prepa- 
ration of nurses. Although the theoretical instruction was meager and 
the practice was not systematically planned, the plan focused attention 
on the fact that the women who had had these brief courses gave 
better care to patients. Each year the instruction was amplified, and 
finally in 1877 a training school for nurses "to consist of one teacher 
and twenty-four pupils" was established. The first course was eighteen 
months in length. Thirteen years later the course was increased to two 
years, and in 1896, to three years. It was fitting that on the 65th 
anniversary of this great school it should become a school in a great 
university. 

OPPORTUNITIES IN 
THE FIELD OF NURSING 

Nursing plays an important role in civic and community life and 
nurses as a professional group must be prepared to accept unusual and 
increasing public responsibilities. The young woman w T ho enters the 
nursing profession today enters a field of community service in which 
new opportunities are being presented through the broadening of 
health services, increased hospital construction, and greater public 
awareness of health practices. 

A good grasp of the principles of bedside care, health teaching, and 
community organization are the bases of all work in nursing. Expert 
bedside care for all who are in need of it plus increased prevention of 
illness are national as well as local goals, the attainment of which can 
be realized only with the help of well-prepared nurses. 

The career opportunities for the well-equipped nurse are legion. 
Many nurses are needed for the direct care of patients in hospitals and 
in homes. Many are needed in teaching and administrative positions 
and to assist in the organization of the community for more complete 
health services. Participation in research studies and in the preparation 
of specialized materials for use in the nursing and health field are an 
important part of the work of nurses in a great many positions and 
offer career possibilities to those whose interests and abilities lie in 
these directions. These and similar positions are available in connec- 
tion with hospitals, public health agencies, and schools of nursing. 

13 



FACILITIES FOR INSTRUCTION 

Unusual instruction facilities are available to students of the nursing 
school in the class rooms, laboratories, libraries, clinical departments 
of the hospital and various community agencies of the city. 

Well-equipped class rooms, laboratories, library, and instructors' of- 
fices are provided on the second floor of the Nurses Residence, which 
is devoted entirely to a complete teaching unit. Through the Cornell 
University Medical College further laboratory and library facilities 
are available in adjacent buildings. 

The library of the school includes a wide selection of periodicals 
on nursing, including complete sets of important medical and nursing 
periodicals in bound volumes. The library is under the direction of a 
committee of the faculty. The facilities of the library of the Medical 
College are equally accessible and supplement those of the nursing 
school in such a way as to make available to students and faculty of the 
school unusual resources. A librarian is in constant attendance in both 
libraries. The open-shelf system prevails throughout, thereby permitting 
free access to all books. Additional small ward libraries are adjacent 
to the nursing conference rooms on the hospital floors in all depart- 
ments. Through the New York Public Library, valuable supplementary 
sociological materials are placed at the disposal of instructors and stu- 
dents as needed. 

The clinical facilities of the New York Hospital are unsurpassed for 
the care and study of patients. The Hospital was planned with the 
conception that it should be composed of five University clinics, largely 
self-contained. Each of these is provided not only with facilities ade- 
quate in every way for medical practice both for in-patients and out- 
patients, but also with facilities for teaching and for the conduct of 
research. An unusual number of specialized clinical services are there- 
fore available which are seldom found within a single organization. 
The hospital has a capacity of over one thousand beds and during the 
past year 22,260 patients were admitted. The conduct of research in all 
clinical departments gives the student nurse an opportunity to become 
increasingly aware of the part which the nurse must be prepared to 
play in research projects. Authenticity of the findings in such studies 
depends in no small degree on the accuracy with which the nurse car- 
ries out tests and procedures, and records and observes reactions. 

The medical and surgical departments include, in addition to 
general medicine and surgery, pavilions devoted to the specialties of 

14 



F 

to 

I 



urology, communicable diseases, eye, ear, nose, and throat disorders, 
medical neurology, emergencies, and metabolism. The Woman's Clinic, 
developed from the New York Lying-in and the Manhattan Maternity 
Hospital, has a capacity of 190 adults and 121 newborns and provides 
for obstetric and gynecological patients. During the past year 3,241 
deliveries took place in this clinic. The department of pediatrics, 
which took over the New York Nursery and Childs Hospital and the 
infants from the Manhattan Maternity Hospital, includes 86 beds with 
separate floors for the care of infants, children, and premature babies. 
Facilities for the recreation of convalescent children offer opportunities 
for the student of nursing to study the development and handling of 
convalescent as well as sick children. The Payne Whitney Clinic for 
psychiatric care has a bed capacity of 89 patients and offers partici- 
pation in hydrotherapy, occupational and recreational therapy as part 
of the experience in the care of the mentally ill. The close connection 
between the psychiatric medical staff and the medical staffs of the other 
clinical departments on a consultation basis gives the student an op- 
portunity to study the mental manifestations of illness throughout her 
experience in the hospital. 

The out-patient department of the Hospital provides excellent op- 
portunity for the study of ambulatory patients on all services. Last 
year 43,666 patients were cared for in this department, an average of 
842 patients daily. The out-patient department gives opportunity for 
participation in the consultant service for expectant mothers, mothers' 
classes, family studies, nutrition conferences, special aspects of the treat- 
ment and follow-up on venereal diseases, and many other activities in 
the care of ambulatory patients. 

Cooperation with the Visiting Nurse Service of New York, the De- 
partment of Educational Nursing of the Community Service Society 
of New York, and other community agencies, affords opportunities in 
community nursing programs. Altho'ugh, during the period of the war, 
public health nursing agencies have found it necessary to limit student 
activity due to staff shortage and increased service demands, it is antici- 
pated that these agencies, so essential in the preparation of the nurse, 
will be able to offer participation in nursing care and health teaching 
of patients in their homes. Several nursery schools in the city cooperate 
in offering opportunity for the study and handling of well children in 
group activity. The Kips Bay-Yorkville Health Center, the Lenox Hill 
Neighborhood House, and the Guggenheim Dental Clinic, all located 
within two blocks of the Hospital, offer convenient opportunity for 
student observations of community health programs, as do many other 
agencies in the city. 

The Social Service Department of the New York Hospital partici- 
pates in the nursing course through the integration of social service in 
i the program of study. 

15 






AIM OF THE SCHOOL 

The aim of the school is to give the student a good grasp of the 
principles of bedside care, health teaching, and community organi- 
zation for the care and prevention of illness; to develop the individual 
student as a responsible citizen; to qualify her for professional practice 
in the hospital, home, or public health agency. 



REQUIREMENTS FOR 
ADMISSION AND GRADUATION 

REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION 

All students enter the School of Nursing on the recommendation of 
the faculty Committee on Admissions which reviews all applications. 
Since nursing requires women of integrity, of high intelligence, and 
with a deep interest in public service, those candidates are selected 
whose credentials indicate high rank in scholarship, personal fitness 
for nursing, maturity, and good general health. 

The minimum educational requisites for admission are satisfactory 
completion of at least two years of college (60 credits exclusive of physi- 
cal education). The applicant may have taken her college work at 
Cornell University, Ithaca, New York, or at any university or senior 
or junior college accredited by the Association of American Universi- 
ties or by one of the regional associations of colleges and secondary 
schools. 

Because the work of the nurse requires that she have an understand- 
ing of human reactions and of social factors influencing community 
development, that she be able to express herself well, and participate 
in community planning for nursing services, it is important that she 
obtain a sound background in history, psychology, and other social 
sciences, as well as in literature, English, and foreign languages. With 
the exception of psychology, indicated below, specific requirements in 
these subjects are not laid down because a variety of satisfactory combi- 
nations can be accepted. A sound two-year liberal arts program serves 
as a foundation on which to build all professional advancement. 

Physical sciences are important in the preparation for admission, 
but should not be taken at the expense of the subjects referred to above. 
Obviously, the young woman who can devote more than two years to 
her liberal arts preparation has more leeway to include several science 
courses in her college work as well as further general academic courses, i 

16 



Unquestionably, this would be desirable in preparation for many po- 
sitions in the field of nursing. 

Beginning with the class entering in the fall of 1948 all applicants 
will be required to have completed college courses in the following 
physical and social sciences before admission to the school of nursing: 

Chemistry (including laboratory) 6 credit hours 

Biological Science (including laboratory) ... 6 credit hours 

Psychology 3 credit hours 

Students entering prior to that date are urged to include these subjects 
in their academic program. 

High school students will be guided in their selection of their high 
school curriculum by the entrance requirements of the colleges of their 
choice. The high school program should be devoted to English, history, 
mathematics, science, and foreign languages. 

APPLICATION FOR ADMISSION 

A blank for formal application for admission to the School of Nurs- 
ing, containing full instructions, may be obtained from the Dean of 
the Cornell University-New York Hospital School of Nursing, 525 East 
Sixty-eighth Street, New York 21, New York. As one measure of suita- 
bility for nursing, certain psychological tests are required at the time 
of application. The applicant is asked to meet the small charge for 
these tests. 

Arrangements for a personal interview will be made for the applicant 
whose record shows promise of meeting the requirements of the school. 
She will meet with a member of the Committee on Admissions of the 
school in New York, or, if this is not practicable, with an alumna or 
other qualified person designated by the committee and living in the 
vicinity of the applicant. 

Candidates for admission must make a deposit of $25.00 upon notifi- 
cation of acceptance to the school. The full amount is credited toward 
fees payable at registration. The deposit is not refundable if the candi- 
date withdraws her application. 

It is desirable for the prospective student to make formal application 
by the end of her first college year if she plans to enter this school after 
her second college year. Before that time the school welcomes any cor- 
respondence or interviews with the prospective candidate or her parents 
which will assist her in planning her high school or college program. 
Acceptance to the school is final only after all requirements have been 
completed satisfactorily. 

New students register at the school in New York, Monday, September 
29, 1947. It is urged that application be made well in advance of this 
date but consideration will be given as long as vacancies exist. 






i 



17 



REQUIREMENTS FOR PROMOTION AND GRADUATION 

The established system of grading is a scale of F to A, with D as the 
lowest passing grade. An average of C for a given term is required for 
promotion without condition. A grade of C is required in the course 
Nursing Arts I, and a grade of B in the course Pharmacology I. A grade 
below C in any clinical field of nursing practice or a term average 
which is less than C places a student on major warning. This must be 
removed by the end of the next term to insure further promotion. 
A student on major warning is ineligible to hold office in student 
organizations. 

A grade of I (incomplete) is assigned if the work of a course is not 
completed because of illness or unavoidable absence and if, in the judg- 
ment of the instructor, the student has shown evidence that she can 
complete the course satisfactorily in a reasonable length of time. 

An F (failure) in any given subject may necessitate withdrawal from 
the school unless the student's scholarship is exceptional in other 
respects, in which case repetition of the course may be recommended 
by the instructor. 

A cumulative average of C for three years' work is required for 
graduation. 

The school reserves the privilege of retaining in the school only 
those students who, in the judgment of the faculty, satisfy the require- 
ments of scholarship, health, and personal suitability for the nursing 
profession. 

ADVANCED STANDING 

A student who has received her baccalaureate degree before ad- 
mission may apply for a reduction in total time in clinical experience, 
thus reducing her time in the school by two to six months. An average 
of B in theory and practice throughout the course is necessary for 
favorable consideration. Exemption must be requested during the last 
term of the second year. 

DEGREE AND DIPLOMA 

The degree of Bachelor of Science in Nursing will be granted by 
Cornell University and a diploma in nursing by the New York Hospi- 
tal, upon recommendation of the faculty of the School of Nursing, to 
candidates who have completed satisfactorily the prescribed course in 
nursing. 

Any students admitted prior to establishment of the entrance re- 
quirement of two years of college for all students and who did not 
present two years of college preparation acceptable to the University 
for admission to the degree program are candidates for the diploma 
only. 

18 



STATE REGISTRATION 

Immediately upon completion graduates of the school are expected to 
make application to take the State Board examination for registration 
in New York State or in the state in which they expect to practice. 
In New York State citizenship or declared intention of becoming a 
citizen is required. If citizenship is not completed within seven years 
from the date of the declaration of intention, state licensure is revoked. 

EXPENSES 

FEES AND EXPENSES 

Fees and other expenses which must be met by the student are as 
follows: 

First Second Third 

FEES Year Year Year Total 

Matriculation $11.00 $11.00 

Administration 20.00 20.00 

Tuition 100.00 $50.00 $50.00 200.00 

Laboratory 25.00 25.00 

Public Health Affiliation 1.00 1.00 1.00 3.00 

Chemistry Breakage 5.00 5.00 

Library 2.00 1.50 1.50 5.00 

Health Service 10.00 5.00 5.00 20.00 

Graduation 20.00 20.00 

Student Organization 5.25 5.25 5.25 15.75 

$179.25 §62.75 $82.75 $324.75 
OTHER EXPENSES (Subject to variation) 

Aprons k accessories of uniforms $27.80 $3.00 $30.80 

Uniform shoes 10.00 10.00 20.00 

Uniform sweater 5.00 5.00 

, Uniform cape (optional) 15.00 15.00 

Gymnasium suits 10.00 10.00 

Books, keys, bandage scissors, 

and miscellaneous 40.00 $5.00 5.00 50.00 

Rental laboratory coat 1.00 1.00 

: Miscellaneous expenses in connec- 
tion with field trips, etc 2.00 2.00 2.00 6.00 

$110.80 $7.00 $20.00 $137.80 
TOTAL FEES & EXPENSES $290.05 $69.75 $102.75 $462.55 

19 






None of the articles listed should be obtained before admission to 
the school. A list of personal equipment will be sent to each student 
when accepted for admission. 

Upon acceptance for admission a deposit of $25.00 is required. This 
is credited towards the tuition for the first year but is not refundable 
if application is withdrawn. The $100.00 for the first year is payable 
$25.00 upon acceptance, $50.00 at registration, and $25.00 at the begin- 
ning of the second term. 

Breakage fee is refundable if no breakage is incurred. Graduation 
fee is payable at the beginning of the third term and is refundable if 
student is not graduated. Student organization fee is payable to class 
treasurer. Estimated expenses for books include approximately $10.00 
optional. 

MAINTENANCE 

The student has no expense for room, board or laundry during the 
course. The necessary dresses and caps of the school uniform are also 
provided without expense. Other items of the uniform for which the 
student pays are listed under expenses. In case of illness limited in- 
firmary and hospital care is provided without cost. 

FINANCIAL AID 

Student loan funds have been established and are available for stu- 
dents who need financial aid and show promise in nursing after the 
first term in the school. 

A few scholarships of a maximum of $200.00 are available for students 
entering in the fall of 1946 who are not able to meet the full payment 
of fees and expenses for the three years. These scholarships are granted 
at the end of the first year on the basis of satisfactory work as well as 
need. Applications may be made at the time of application to the school 
or at any time prior to the opening of the third term of the first year. 

A student w T ho is unable to meet the expenses of the first year and 
who in all other respects stands high in meeting admission requisites 
will also be considered on an individual basis for possible loan or 
scholarship aid. 

HEALTH SERVICE 

The school maintains a health service for its students under the 
general direction of a committee of the faculty with a physician ap- 
pointed to the staff of the school. Upon admission to the school a 
physical examination by the school physician and a chest X-ray are 
required. Subsequently a chest X-ray is required every four months. 

Vaccinations against typhoid fever and smallpox will be required of 

20 



all students before admission to the school. Schick and Dick tests and 
immunization for positive reaction to the Schick test will be required 
of all students after admission to the school. Mantoux tests will be 
given during the pre-clinical period and for those who are negative 
will be repeated at regular intervals. 

A well-equipped infirmary with necessary staff is maintained in the 
nurses' residence. Gratuitous infirmary care for minor illnesses will be 
limited to four weeks at any one time in the case of all students. For 
more serious illnesses students will be cared for gratuitously in the 
hospital for not more than two weeks at any one time for the first-year 
students, and not more than four weeks at any one time for second and 
third year students. Expenses for special nursing care and special thera- 
pies must be borne by the student or her family. 

VACATIONS AND ABSENCES 

A vacation of four weeks is given in each of the first two years and 
two weeks in the third. Students who have an exemption of time are 
not granted a vacation in the third year. All vacations are arranged to 
conform to the requirements of the educational program. 

As a result of absences the repetition of a course of study or special 
examinations may be required, class registration may be changed, and 
in necessary instances nursing practice will have to be made up. 

ACTIVITIES 

RESIDENCE FACILITIES 

Students live in the Nurses' Residence, a sixteen-story fireproof build- 
ing adjacent to the hospital. Every effort has been made in the con- 
struction and equipment of the residence to provide for the normal 
and healthy life of students and faculty. 

Comfortable lounges, reading, reception, and dining rooms are lo- 
cated on the first and ground floors. Students have attractively fur- 
nished single rooms with running water and each of the eight student 
floors is equipped with ample baths, showers, and toilet facilities, a 
laundry, and a common sitting room with adjoining kitchenette for 
informal gatherings. 

RECREATIONAL FACILITIES 

Believing that the education of young women today must include 

ictivities relative to healthful social relationships, generous provision 

or this development in the life of the student has been made. 

|; An excellent browsing library of fiction and biography includes both 

urrent and standard works and many magazines of general interest. 

21 



A branch of the New York Public Library is located within a few 
blocks of the hospital. 

In addition to the ample lounges for informal and formal use, a 
large, well-equipped gymnasium-auditorium is located in the south 
wing of the first floor of the residence. Other game rooms, sun porches, 
and a hobby room are also available for general use. Students who have 
had preparation in music are urged to keep up their interest and 
participation. Opportunities for glee club participation are available 
under a trained director. Student activities arranged jointly with the 
Cornell University Medical College are a regular part of the recreation. 

By arrangement with a nearby school, an indoor swimming pool and 
an additional large gymnasium are regularly available. Through the 
Students' Athletic Association arrangements are made for joining with 
other schools of nursing in special sports events. Beach equipment and 
an outdoor grill are available through the House Committee. 

To insure the full benefit of proper use of these facilities a Residence 
Director and well-qualified assistants for special activities are in charge. 
House activities are planned by the House Committee, which is made 
up of representatives of those living in the Residence, of staff members 
living out, and of alumnae. 

The cultural opportunities of New York City are almost limitless in 
music, art, ballet, theatre, and libraries. Through the House Committee 
students and graduates enjoy the benefits of such opportunities as mem- 
bership in the Metropolitan Museum of Art, American Museum of 
Natural History, Metropolitan Opera Guild, Institute of Arts and 
Sciences, and the Student and Professional Ticket Service. 

An annual activity fee, paid by students and graduates alike, sup- 
ports the varied activities. 

SCHOOL GOVERNMENT 

The school has a cooperative government in which the students carry 
a responsible and active part. All students belong to the Student Organ- 
ization which functions with the Faculty Committee on Student Affairs 
in all matters relating to social and professional conduct and discipline. 

All students entering the school accept the privileges and obligations 
of self-government under the honor system, which is understood to 
apply to all matters of personal and professional conduct. 

ALUMNAE ASSOCIATION 

The Cornell University-New York Hospital School of Nursing Alum- 
nae Association, originally the Alumnae Association of the New York 
Hospital School of Nursing, was organized in 1893. It was one of the 
ten alumnae associations which helped to bring about the national pro- 
fessional organization of nurses first known as the Nurses Associated 
Alumnae of the United States and Canada. This is now the American 

22 






Nurses Association. In 1945 the Alumnae Association became a part of 
the Cornell University Alumni Association. 

One of the lounges of the Residence is known as the Alumnae Room, 
and alumnae meetings and many alumnae functions are held in this 
room. 

PLAN OF INSTRUCTION 

The curriculum covers a period of three calendar years, the full time 
being spent in residence at the school with the exception of vacations, 
which total ten weeks. Each year is divided into three terms, two of 
sixteen weeks, and the summer term of twenty weeks, which includes 
vacation. 

In each clinical service, related classes, clinical conferences and bed- 
side instruction are given concurrently with practice. In several of the 
clinical services the student receives experience in evening and night 
duty so that she may have the complete picture of the care of the 
patient and his needs. An introduction to community nursing and to 
the various agencies assisting at the time of illness is provided through 
visits with the staff members of community health agencies, observation 
in various community organizations, conferences centered around fami- 
ly health, and participation in the referral of patients requiring nursing 
care after discharge from the hospital. 

In the first year, the first term and a half are devoted primarily to 
class and laboratory assignments with a limited amount of nursing 
practice in the pavilions of the hospital. In the remainder of the first 
year the student is assigned to the medical and surgical departments for 
theory and practice in these clinical fields. 

The three terms of the second year are devoted to classes and practice 
in pediatric, obstetric, gynecological, communicable disease, and oper- 
ating room nursing. Assignments are made to the main clinical depart- 
ments for sixteen-week periods during which students are rotated to 
the different divisions of the department. In the assignments to pedi- 
atrics and obstetrics, out-patient experience is included in this period 
and emphasis is placed on disease prevention and health instruction. 

The third-year program includes psychiatry, the out-patient depart- 
ment, and advanced assignments in the care of medical and surgical 
patients. In this year the three terms are divided into six units. Since 
most students admitted prior to October 15, 1945, became Cadets in 
the U. S. Cadet Nurse Corps, the third year for students completing 
before October 1948 is so arranged that all formal classes will be com- 
pleted in the first three units of the year. The last three units are de- 
voted to supervised practice. For students entering the school after 
October 15, 1945, there will be some changes from the accelerated pro- 
gram in effect during the war period. 

During the clinical terms students are scheduled for a forty-eight- 
hour week which includes all classes and nursing practice assignments. 

23 



FIRST YEAR 

HOURS 

Class and Practice * 
Laboratory (Approx.) 
Orientation including 

Personal Hygiene — 8 hrs., 

Personality Study — 6 hrs 30 

Anatomy 60 

Physiology 50 

Chemistry 55 

Microbiology 50 

Clinical Pathology 20 

Social & Economic Aspects of Health & Disease 30 

History of Nursing 24 

Professional Adjustments I 15 

Psychology 30 

Psychology of Deviate Behavior 15 

Nursing Arts I 49 104 

Nursing Arts II 38 164 

Nutrition & Cookery 30 

Diet Therapy 30 

Pharmacology I 15 

Pharmacology II 30 

Medicine 40 

Communicable Diseases 14 

Medical Nursing (including Communicable 

Diseases) 45 500 

Surgery 38 

Surgical Nursing 30 500 

Physical Education — 

Total hours first year 738 1268 * 

* Two or more hours a week of bedside instruction and conferences are included in 
hours of practice. 



LM 



SECOND YEAR 

HOURS 

Class and Practice * 
Laboratory (Approx.) 

Pediatrics 20 

Pediatric Nursing 50 688 

Development of Behavior in Children 30 



Obstetrics and Gynecology 



30 



Obstetric and Gynecological Nursing 30 698 

Medical Nursing 192 

Diet Therapy Practice 192 

Operative Technique 15 359 

Physical Education 



Total hours second year 175 2129 



* Two or more hours a week of bedside instruction and conferences are included in 
practice hours. 

THIRD YEAR 

Psychiatry 30 

Psychiatric Nursing 30 700 

Family and Community Health 20 

Out-Patient Nursing (Medical and Surgical) .... 356 

(Including Nutrition Clinic— 48 hrs.) 

Medical Nursing 8 412 

Surgical Nursing 8 412 

Emergency Nursing 22 

Private Patients Nursing 192 

Professional Adjustments II 15 

Elective 192 

Physical Education 



Total hours third year 133 2264 * 

Grand Totals 1046 5661 * 



* Two or more hours a week of bedside instruction and conferences which approxi- 
mate a total of 244 hours in the three years are included in the practice hours. 

25 



DESCRIPTION OF COURSES 

BIOLOGICAL AND PHYSICAL SCIENCES 

100. ANATOMY. This course includes both gross and microscopical anatomy. The 
gross anatomy is taught by lectures, demonstrations, and student dissection of the 
cadaver. The microscopical work is directly correlated with the gross dissection and 
includes a detailed study of prepared slides. Significant embryological information is 
included in the lectures. 

60 Hours, First Year. Dr. HINSEY, Dr. HAMMOND, Dr. BERRY. 

101. PHYSIOLOGY. The course is directed toward an understanding of the principles 
involved in the functioning of the human body and the integration of its various 
systems. It is an essential prerequisite to the study of nursing arts, nutrition, and 
pathology. Lectures, recitations, demonstrations, and laboratory. 

50 Hours, First Year. Dr. DuBOIS, Miss RYNBERGEN. 

102. CHEMISTRY. A course designed to acquaint students with some of the funda- 
mental principles of physiological chemistry as these apply to nursing practice. 
Studies of water balance, the digestion and metabolism of food, and the composition 
of blood, milk, and urine are included. Lectures, recitations, demonstrations, and 
laboratory. 

55 Hours, First Year. Dr. DuVIGNEAUD, Miss RYNBERGEN, Dr. SUMMERSON, 
Mrs. LEE. 

103. MICROBIOLOGY. An introduction to the study of microorganisms, particu- 
larly the microbial agents of disease. Sources, modes of spread and prevention of 
infectious diseases; principles and practice of asepsis. Applications of bacteriology 
and immunology to the diagnosis, prevention, and treatment of infectious diseases. 
50 Hours, First Year. Dr. NEILL, Dr. HEHRE. 

104. PATHOLOGY. A brief orientation course designed to acquaint the student with 
some of the more common laboratory procedures and to indicate the relation of the 
clinical laboratories to hospital activities. It presents pathologic changes in infections 
and neoplasms, hematology, blood grouping and transfusions, urinalysis, and para- 
sitology with practice in a few of the techniques. The blood group of each student is 
ascertained and recorded. Lectures, conferences, and laboratory. 

20 Hours, First Year. Dr. STILLMAN. 

SOCIAL SCIENCES 

110. PSYCHOLOGY. An introduction to the study of human behavior and the under- 
lying principles of mental adjustments and habit formation. An effort is made to 
apply this study to the student's own personality and give her a more scientific basis 
by which she can get a better understanding of the behavior of herself, her co- 
workers, and her patients. Lectures and recitations. 

30 Hours, First Year. Miss KENNEDY. 

111. PSYCHOLOGY OF DEVIATE BEHAVIOR. A study of the deviations in be- 
havior of adults and children, due to organic and sociological factors, and of the 

26 



nursing care necessary in assisting patients in making more adequate adjustments 
during illness. The principles of mental hygiene are emphasized. Lectures and reci- 
tations. 
15 Hours, First Year. Miss KENNEDY. 

112. SOCIAL AND HEALTH ASPECTS OF NURSING. Study of the patient as an 
individual conditioned by psychological and cultural influences. Interrelationship 
of individual, family, and community health and the work of the nurse in prevention 
of disease and the promotion of health. Lectures, conferences, reports, excursions to 
Community agencies. 

30 Hours, First Year. Mrs. OVERHOLSER, Miss SOULE. 

113. FAMILY AND COMMUNITY HEALTH. An introduction to the study of local, 
state, and national health services and how they may be used for family health. 
Consideration is given to nursing in public health and to the preparation of nurses 
for effective participation in its development. 

20 Hours, Third Year. Dr. SMILLIE, Mrs. OVERHOLSER. 

114. COMMUNITY NURSING PRINCIPLES AND PRACTICES. Practice in the 
Out-Patient Department; visits to community agencies; contact with the home 
through community nursing agencies; family study and related conferences with 
members of the social service department. 

308 Hours, Third Year. Medical and Surgical Out-Patient Department. Mrs. OVER- 
HOLSER, Miss REID, Miss POOR, Miss RYNBERGEN, Miss RICHMOND, and 
Miss SOULE and staff. 

115. HISTORY OF NURSING. A survey of nursing from its early beginnings to 
modern times. Nursing history considered in relation to concurrent philosophical, 
social, and scientific developments. 

24 Hours, First Year. Mrs. OVERHOLSER. 

116. PROFESSIONAL ADJUSTMENTS I. A consideration of the philosophical and 
ethical foundations of conduct and their application to the profession of nursing. 
Problems related to group life and adjustment to patients and co-workers are pre- 
sented by students for discussion and analysis. 

15 Hours, First Year. Mrs. OVERHOLSER. *>* 

•117. PROFESSIONAL ADJUSTMENTS II. Through a general survey of the nursing 
field, the student has an opportunity to study the trends in the profession; the need 
and opportunities for specialized preparation; the importance and types of legis- 
lation; the activities of professional organizations and the obligations of their mem- 
bers. Lectures and conferences. 
15 Hours. Third Year. Miss DUNBAR, Miss PARKER, and special lecturers. 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

118. PHYSICAL EDUCATION. The student has an opportunity to participate in 
group activities, such as basketball, volleyball, softball, and soccer, as well as indi- 
vidual sports, such as swimming, tennis, golf, badminton, and archery, in all of which 
emphasis is placed on the learning of techniques and the development of skill. The 
program also includes body mechanics, folk, square, and modern dance for body 
development and good coordination. 
64 Hours, Each Year. Miss McDERMOTT, Miss SCHIRMER. 

27 



NURSING AND ALLIED ARTS - GENERAL 

120. ORIENTATION. This course is designed to give the beginning student a 
general conception of the field of nursing; the responsibilities and obligations of each 
individual in choosing the profession; the importance of general conduct in building 
up the right habits of living and attitudes of the nurse. It includes lectures in per- 
sonal hygiene and personality study, emphasizing the importance of physical and 
mental health especially as it relates to the life of the nurse and is reflected in her 
work. 

30 Hours, First Year. Miss DUNBAR, Miss KENNEDY, Mrs. OVERHOLSER, Dr. 
DOTY, Dr. LANSDOWN, Miss McDERMOTT. 

121. NURSING ARTS I. (a) A Course designed to give the student an understanding 
of the basic principles of nursing, with emphasis upon attitude toward the patient, 
social relationships, physical requirements for proper care of patients, and the basic 
procedures used in care of the sick. Lectures and demonstrations. 

49 Hours, First Year. Miss MacLEAN. 

(b) Practice includes application of basic principles of nursing in the Nursing Arts 
laboratory and surgical supply room, and in the actual care of convalescent patients 
on the pavilions of the hospital. 
104 Hours, First Year. Miss MacLEAN, Miss A. McCLUSKEY, Miss ZORN. 

122. NURSING ARTS II. (a) A course designed to give the student an understanding 
of advanced nursing principles and procedures, and to assist in the development and 
perfection of skills. It is correlated with lectures on the medical and surgical aspects 
of disease, and with instruction in nursing care pertinent to these conditions. Lectures 
and demonstrations. 

38 Hours, First Year. Miss MacLEAN. 

(b) Practice includes application of advanced nursing principles and procedures in 
the Nursing Arts laboratory, and in the actual care of ill patients on the pavilions 
of the hospital. 
164 Hours, First Year. Miss MacLEAN, Miss A. McCLUSKEY. 

123. EMERGENCY NURSING. This course deals with the application of nursing 
principles to emergency situations in the home and community. Lectures and demon- 
strations. First Aid certificate granted by American Red Cross. 

22 Hours, Third Year. Dr. REDDEN. 

124. PHARMACOLOGY I. Designed to familiarize the student with the systems used 
in weighing and measuring drugs; methods of making solutions; calculating dosages; 
and stressing the nurse's responsibility in the administration of medicines. 

15 Hours, First Year. Miss KEMPER. 

125. PHARMACOLOGY II. A course planned to help the student acquire knowledge 
of the facts and principles of drug therapy and of the responsibilities of the nurse in 
the administration of medicines. It includes a study of the important and commonly 
used drugs, their physiological and therapeutic actions, dosage, administration, idio- 
syncrasies, and toxic symptoms. Emphasis is given to the accurate administration of 
drugs and the careful observation of their effects. 

30 Hours, First Year. Dr. CATTELL, Miss KEMPER. 

28 



NUTRITION 

130. NUTRITION AND COOKING. A basic course in normal adult nutrition and 
in food preparation. (The nutrition requirements in childhood and in pregnancy are 
discussed during the student's practice on pediatric and obstetric services in the 
second year.) 

30 Hours, First Year. Miss RYNBERGEN, Miss IBA. 

131. DIET THERAPY. A course designed to present the underlying principles in the 
treatment of disease by means of special dietaries; given concurrently with the lec- 
tures in Medical and Surgical Diseases. This course is supplemented by conference 
work during the student's practice on medical and surgical services. Lectures, reci- 
tations, and laboratory. 

30 Hours, First Year. Miss RYNBERGEN, Miss IBA. 

132. PRACTICE OF DIET THERAPY. The application of the principles of diet 
therapy to the care of patients in supervised practice on the pavilions of the hospital 
and in the out-patient clinic. 

192 Hours, Second Year; 48 Hours, Third Year. Miss STEPHENSON, Miss RYN- 
BERGEN, Miss IBA, Miss SKINNER, Miss TILLOTSON, Miss BABCOCK, Miss 
RICHMOND. 

MEDICAL NURSING 

140. MEDICINE. Medical aspects of diseases are considered in these lectures and 
clinics. Material presented will supplement, emphasize, and interpret required read- 
ing covering etiology, sources of infection, symptomatology, usual course pathology, 
complications, treatment, prognosis, and prevention. 

40 Hours, First Year. Dr. BARR and staff. 

141. COMMUNICABLE DISEASES. A study of communicable diseases, including 
tuberculosis. Special emphasis is placed upon etiology, modes of transmission, and 
prevention. Lectures and clinics. 

14 Hours, First Year. Dr. BARR and staff. 

142. PRINCIPLES OF MEDICAL NURSING INCLUDING COMMUNICABLE 
DISEASE NURSING. A study by lectures and demonstrations of the principles and 
methods of nursing which are specific to this division of nursing practice. In the 
third year emphasis is placed upon managerial and teaching problems and current 
developments requiring new methods of treatment. 

45 Hours, First Year; 8 Hours, Third Year. Miss KLEIN, Miss KEMPER, Miss DUNN. 

143. PRACTICE OF MEDICAL NURSING INCLUDING COMMUNICABLE DIS- 
EASE NURSING. Supervised practice and study of the application of medical nurs- 
ing principles and methods to the care of patients on the medical pavilions of the 
hospital. In addition, students study and practice medical aseptic nursing as related 
to the care of patients suffering from communicable diseases including tuberculosis. 
Practice includes care of patients and managerial experience during day, evening, 
and night. Demonstrations and conferences. 

1104 Hours, First, Second, and Third Years (includes 384 hours of communicable 
disease nursing.) Miss KLEIN, Miss KEMPER, Miss HENDERSON, Miss HILLS, 
Miss DUNN, Miss McNEER, and staff. 

1 14. PRACTICE IN CARE OF PRIVATE PATIENTS. Application of principles of 
medical and surgical nursing to the care of private patients. 
192 Hours, Third Year. Miss MOFFATT, Mrs. MILLER, and staff. 

29 



SURGICAL NURSING 

150. SURGERY. Surgical aspects of diseases are presented in these lectures and clinics. 
Factors determining the need for surgical interference are discussed and the major 
steps in the operation outlined. Special emphasis is placed upon signs, symptoms, 
and observations which should be made both preceding and following operation. 
38 Hours, First Year. Dr. HEUER and staff. 

151. PRINCIPLES OF SURGICAL NURSING. Through lectures and demonstrations 
students are taught the principles and methods of surgical asepsis and the nursing 
of surgical patients. In the third year emphasis is placed upon managerial and 
teaching problems, and current developments requiring new methods of treatment. 
30 Hours, First Year; 8 Hours, Third Year. Miss KLEIN, Miss FEDDER, Miss 
HARMON, Miss C. McCLUSKEY, Miss SWANWICK. 

152. PRACTICE OF SURGICAL NURSING. Supervised practice and study of the 
application of nursing principles to the care of patients on surgical pavilions of the 
hospital. Practice includes care of patients and managerial experience during the 
dav, evening, and night. Demonstrations and conferences. 

912 Hours, First and Third Years. Miss KLEIN, Miss FEDDER, Miss HARMON. 
Miss HENDERSON, Miss HILLS, Miss C. McCLUSKEY, Miss SWANWICK, Miss 
McNEER, and staff. 

153. OPERATIVE TECHNIQUE. This course is designed to give the student a 
thorough understanding of surgical aseptic technique. She is given an opportunity 
to observe and assist with operative procedures and to gain an appreciation of the 
qualities and abilities essential to effective nursing in this field. 

15 Hours, lectures, demonstrations, and conferences. 359 Hours, practice Second Year. 
Miss KLEIN, Miss HASLUP, and staff. 

OBSTETRIC AND GYNECOLOGICAL NURSING 

160. OBSTETRICS AND GYNECOLOGY. This course deals with the physiology of 
pregnancy, labor, and the puerperium; the care, development, and adjustment of 
the newborn infant; the principles of nutrition for mother and child; prevention of 
complications; endocrine influences; treatment of obstetric-gynecologic pathology; 
relation of obstetrics to the abnormalities of the generative organs; sociologic aspects 
of procreation. 

30 Hours, Second Year. Dr. STANDER and staff, Miss RYNBERGEN, Miss IBA. 

161. PRINCIPLES OF OBSTETRICS AND GYNECOLOGICAL NURSING. This 
course emphasizes the importance of prenatal instruction, observation, and care; 
infant, obstetric, and gynecologic nursing procedures with particular attention to 
preventing infection; current types of therapy. 

30 Hours, Second Year. Miss HICKCOX and staff. 

162. PRACTICE OF OBSTETRIC AND GYNECOLOGICAL NURSING. Under 
supervised practice in the pavilions, nurseries, operating rooms, labor and delivery 
rooms, and out-patient department, students have the opportunity to observe and 
care for infants and obstetric and gynecological patients. Nursing practice, nursing 
care studies, conferences, and also field trips under the supervision of the Visiting 
Nurse Service of New York. 

698 Hours, Second Year. Miss HICKCOX and staff. 

30 



PEDIATRIC NURSING 

170. PEDIATRICS. This course presents a study of the representative diseases of 
infancy and childhood and of the many factors which contribute to health and 
diseases. 

20 Hours, Second Year. Dr. LEVINE and staff. 

171. DEVELOPMENT OF BEHAVIOR IN CHILDREN. A study of the normal 
child and his behavior. The susceptibility of the child's behavior responses to the 
various details of family life and of school will be emphasized. Lectures and reci- 
tations. 

30 Hours, Second Year. Miss WHITLEY. 

172. PRINCIPLES OF PEDIATRIC NURSING. The basic principles in the care 
of sick infants and children are taught in conjunction with the social, educational, 
and nutritional aspects of their treatment and behavior as normal children. 

50 Hours, Second Year. Miss SCHUBERT, Mrs. BLATT, Miss FERGUSON, Miss 
REBENTISCH, Miss WOODFALL and staff, Miss RYNBERGEN, Miss IBA. 

173. PRACTICE OF PEDIATRIC NURSING. This consists of supervised experience 
in aseptic nursing methods in the care of infants and children in the pavilion, for- 
mula laboratory, premature nursery, and out-patient department. Case studies and 
conferences. 

688 Hours, Second Year. Miss SCHUBERT, Miss FERGUSON, Miss REBENTISCH, 
Miss STEIGERWALT, Miss WOODFALL and staff, Mrs. BLATT, Miss CRAYER, 
Miss JOHNSON. 

PSYCHIATRIC NURSING 

180. PSYCHIATRY. A course of study designed to acquaint students with psycho- 
pathic conditions, their etiology, pathology, and treatment. Included in this course 
is an historical survey of psychiatry and the mental hygiene movement; a discussion 
of the problems most frequently found in the different periods of human develop- 
ment: nursery school age, pre-puberty, adolescent, climactic, and senile. An intro- 
duction to the techniques and social agencies available in helping people meet their 
problems. 

30 Hours, Third Year. Dr. DIETHELM and staff. 

181. PRINCIPLES OF PSYCHIATRIC NURSING. This course is organized to give 
students an understanding of the basic principles in the nursing care of personality 
disorders and the nursing procedures used in their treatment. Emphasis is placed 
also upon the relation of emotional disturbances to physical illness and of early 
development to future adult life. Lectures, demonstrations, and clinics. 

30 Hours, Third Year. Miss SPROGELL, Miss CORRIGAN, Miss JOINVILLE, 
Miss RATUSHNY, Miss SANTOS and staff, Miss PAIGE. 

182. PRACTICE OF PSYCHIATRIC NURSING. The application of the principles 
of psychiatric nursing through supervised practice in and conferences on the care 
of adults both in the in-patient and out-patient departments. Behavior studies and 
case studies. Two eight-week periods. 

G50 Hours, Third Year. Miss SPROGELL, Miss CORRIGAN, Miss GNAU, Miss 
JOINVILLE, Miss RATUSHNY, Miss SANTOS, Mrs. WHITAKER and staff. 

183. SPECIAL THERAPEUTICS IN PSYCHIATRIC NURSING. An opportunity 
is given the student for observation and practice in hydrotherapy, occupational, and 
recreational therapies, with special emphasis on needs of the individual patient. 
Conferences and supervised practice. 

50 Hours, Third Year. Miss SPARGO, Miss BRINDLE. 

31 



FORM OF BEQUEST 

Gifts or bequests to the School of Nursing may be made 
either to the University or the Hospital with a request 
that they be used for the School of Nursing, as follows: 

"I give and bequeath to Cornell University (or 
"I give and bequeath to the Society of the New 

York Hospital") the sum of $ 

for use in connection with the Cornell Uni- 
versity-New York Hospital School of Nursing." 

If it is desired that a gift shall be used in whole or in part 
for any specific purpose in the program of the School of 
Nursing such use may be specified. 



:^2 



/ 



/ 










tE.1 



bjAOT 









CORNELL UNIVERSITY 
OFFICIAL PUBLICATION 

JULY 1, 1947 

Cornell University — New York Hospital 

School of Nursing 




ANNOUNCEMENT FOR 
1947-1948 SESSIONS 



TERM DATES 1947-1948 



Sept. 29, 1947 
Jan. 19,1948 
May 10, 1948 
Sept. 27, 1948 



Jan. 18, 1948 
May 9, 1948 
Sept. 26, 1948 
Jan. 16, 1949 



Note: The final term for the last February class admitted to 
the school will be October 27, 1947-February 25, 1948. 



CORNELL UNIVERSITY OFFICIAL PUBLICATION 

PUBLISHED BY CORNELL UNIVERSITY AT ITHACA, NEW YORK 

Monthly in September, October, and November. Semimonthly 

December to August inclusive. Volume 39. July 1, 1947. Number 1. 

Entered as second-class matter, December 14, 1916, at the post office 

at Ithaca, New York, under the act of August 24, 1912. 



CORNELL UNIVERSITY 
OFFICIAL PUBLICATION 

Cornell University — New York Hospital 

School of Nursing 

1947-1948 
525 EAST 68TH STREET, NEW YORK 21, N. Y. 



■ 






CONTENTS 

Calendar 3 

Career Opportunities in Nursing 4 

Aim of the School 5 

History 6 

Facilities for Instruction 7 

Requirements for Admission and Graduation 9 

Accreditation 12 

State Registration 12 

Fees and Expenses 13 

Health Service 15 

Vacations and Absences 15 

Activities 16 

Curriculum 17 

Description of Courses 21 

Administrative and Teaching Personnel 28 

Students in the School 38 

Form of Bequest 42 

Index 43 

(Picture Credits: Ben Greenhaus, Paul Parker) 






J I h 
i i 



CALENDAR 

1947 

Sept. 27 Saturday Registration of freshmen students 

Sept. 29 Monday Commencement, September class 

Oct. 13 Monday Columbus Day: holiday (except for freshmen) 

Nov. 27 Thursday Thanksgiving Day: holiday 

Dec. 24 Wednesday Christmas recess for freshmen students begins 

Dec. 25 Thursday Christmas Day: holiday 



Jan. 


l 


Thursday 


Feb. 


12 


Thursday 


Feb. 


23 


Monday 


Feb. 


24 


Tuesday 


May 31 


Monday 


July 


5 


Monday 


Sept. 


6 


Monday 


Sept. 


25 


Saturday 


Sept. 


28 


Tuesday 


Oct. 


12 


Tuesday 


Nov. 


25 


Thursday 


Dec. 


24 


Friday 


Dec. 


25 


Saturday 


Jan. 


1 


Saturday 


Jan. 


2 


Sunday 


Feb. 


12 


Saturday 


Feb. 


22 


Tuesday 


May 


30 


Monday 


July 


4 


Monday 



1948 

New Year's Day: holiday. Last day of Christmas 
recess for freshmen 

Lincoln's Birthday: holiday 

Washington's Birthday: holiday 

Commencement, February class 

Memorial Day: holiday 

Independence Day: holiday 

Labor Day: holiday 

Registration of freshmen students 

Commencement, September class 

Columbus Day: holiday (except for freshmen) 

Thanksgiving Day: holiday 

Christmas recess for freshmen students begins 

Christmas Day: holiday 

1949 
New Year's Day: holiday 
Last day of Christmas recess for freshmen 
Lincoln's Birthday: holiday 
Washington's Birthday: holiday 
Memorial Day: holiday 
Independence Day: holiday 



CAREER OPPORTUNITIES 

IN NURSING 

THE history of the nursing profession is long and 
gallant. Yet never before in all the years during 
which nurses have served mankind have the career 
opportunities been so vital and varied as they are 
today. First, there are the obvious advantages: an 
established, respected career upon graduation from 
school; the opportunity to view firsthand the remark- 
able developments in medicine and allied fields; the 
satisfaction of taking part in the welfare of the com- 
munity and the nation; the security of a position 
which is always urgently needed. 

But above and beyond these more apparent advan- 
tages, a nursing career today offers a new, broader 
challenge to the well-educated, well-prepared young 
woman. In schools, in industry, in community groups, 
there is a rapidly increasing interest in health. Hos- 
pitalization enrollments are growing daily and more 
hospitals are being constructed. The United States 
Health Service facilities are reaching out to more and 
more people. Visiting nurse services are expanding. 
The nation is recognizing not only the need to be 
cured, but the need to keep well. 

Out of this upsurge of public interest has developed 
a new understanding of the need for nurses in myriad 
positions of public responsibility. Direct care of the 
sick in hospitals and homes, research, administration, 
teaching, public health, are only a few of the pos- 
sibilities. These positions must be filled by nurses 
with foresight, intelligence and the ability to accept 
the responsibilities which the needs of the nation will 
place upon them. 



THE AIM OF THE SCHOOL OF NURSING 



The aim of this School of Nursing is to guide the 
student in her development as a responsible citizen; 
to help her secure a good grasp of the principles of 
bedside nursing, health teaching and the use of com- 
munity resources for the care and prevention of ill- 
ness; to assist her in qualifying for professional prac- 
tice in first-level positions in any branch of nursing. 



HISTORY 

THIS School of Nursing was one of the first to be founded in the United 
States, and its seventieth anniversary was celebrated in April, 1947. 
As far back as 1799, Dr. Valentine Seaman, a scholar and prominent 
physician, organized a series of lectures for nurses combined with a course 
of practical instruction on the wards. Although the theoretical content was 
meager and the practical instruction not systematically planned, these 
classes focused attention on the fact that women who had some preparation 
for their work gave better care to patients than those without instruction. 
Each year the program was amplified and in 1877 a formal training school 
for nurses was established "to consist of one teacher and 24 pupils." 

Growth of The New York Hospital 

This school was for many years an integral part of The New York Hos- 
pital, the second oldest hospital in America maintained by private endow- 
ment. George the Third of England granted the Hospital its charter of 
incorporation on June 13, 1771, under the title of The Society of the Hospital 
in the City of New York in America. This title was changed in 1810 to the 
present one of The Society of the New York Hospital. While its roots 
extend far into the past, the Hospital has consistently been sensitive and 
responsive to the changing needs of the community and to the progress of 
science. One evidence of this has been the gradual increase in the functions 
and size of the institution, which necessitated expansion and re-location 
to correspond with the growth of the city. The present site and buildings 
are the third it has occupied. 

Expansion of Nursing Education 

Just as the Hospital has grown and changed to keep pace with the health 
needs of society, so too has the program and organization of the School of 
Nursing been kept flexible and in a continuous state of evolution. The first 
course was eighteen months in length. After thirteen years the course was 
increased to twenty-four months and in 1896 to three years. It was fitting 
that in 1942, on the 65th anniversary of the founding of the school, it should 
have become a part of Cornell University, thus making available the re- 
sources of two great institutions, each of which has a long history and a 
notable record of achievement in the fields of education and public welfare. 

Becomes Part of Cornell 

Cornell University received its first endowment from the Federal Govern- 
ment's Educational Land Grant in 1862. The appropriation under the 

6 



^ 
- 








The Hobbv Shop in the Nurses' Residence encourages spare-rime activities 




Students attend class in psychiatry. 



Morrill Act was to endow a college "where the leading object shall be . . . 
to teach such branches of learning as are related to agriculture and the 
mechanical arts." This was the beginning of a remarkable system of higher 
education. However, it received its greatest impetus through the vision 
and generosity of Ezra Cornell, who, under the influence of Andrew D. 
White, his colleague and later the first president, determined the form of 
the new University. In 1864, an agreement was reached with the legislature 
of New York State which resulted in the founding of "a University of a 
new type ... an institution where any person can find instruction in any 
study." This combination of federal, state and private interests and resources 
is unique. It gives strength to the organization, broadens the aims and the 
policies of the University and extends the influence of its educational ideals. 
One field of service after another has found preparation for its workers 
within this great University. In June, 1927, an association between the 
Cornell University Medical College and The New York Hospital was com- 
pleted, cementing the relationship between the two and resulting in 1932 
in their joint occupancy of the newly-constructed buildings of The New 
York Hospital-Cornell Medical Center on the East River between 68th and 
71st Streets. Preparation for nursing was first brought under the auspices 
of the University in July, 1942, when, by agreement between the Trustees 
of the University and the Governors of The New York Hospital, the School 
of Nursing, long conducted by The Society of the New York Hospital, was 
made an autonomous school in the University. 



FACILITIES FOR INSTRUCTION 

Unusual instruction facilities are available to students of the nursing 
school in the class rooms, laboratories, libraries, clinical departments of 
the Hospital and various community agencies of the city. 

Well-equipped class rooms, laboratories, library and instructors' offices 
are provided on the second floor of the Nurses' Residence, which is a com- 
plete teaching unit. Through the Cornell University Medical College 
further laboratory and library facilities are available in adjacent buildings. 

Large Libraries Available 

The library of the school includes a wide selection of periodicals on 
nursing and related health fields, including complete sets of important 
medical and nursing periodicals in bound volumes. The library is under 
the direction of a committee of the faculty. The facilities of the library of 
the medical college are readily accessible and supplement those of the nursing 
school in such a way as to make available unusual resources to students 
and faculty of the school. A librarian is in constant attendance in both 



libraries. The open-shelf system prevails throughout, thereby permitting 
free access to all books. Additional small ward libraries are adjacent to the 
nursing conference rooms on the Hospital floors in all departments. Through 
the New York Public Library, valuable supplementary sociological materials 
are placed at the disposal of instructors and students as needed. 

Wide Experience Gained in Clinics 

The clinical facilities of The New York Hospital are unsurpassed for the 
care and study of patients. The Hospital was planned to be composed of 
five University clinics, largely self-contained. Each of these is provided not 
only with facilities adequate in every way for medical practice both for 
in-patients and out-patients, but also with facilities for teaching and for 
the conduct of research. An unusual number of specialized clinical services 
are therefore available which are seldom found within a single organization. 
The Hospital has a capacity of over one thousand beds and during the past 
year 24,324 patients were admitted. The conduct of research in all clinical 
departments gives the student nurse an opportunity to become increasingly 
aware of the part which the nurse must be prepared to play in research 
projects. Authenticity of the findings in such studies depends in no small 
degree on the accuracy with which the nurse carries out tests and procedures, 
records and observes reactions. 

The Medical and Surgical Departments include, in addition to general 
medicine and surgery, pavilions devoted to the specialties of urology, com- 
municable disease (including tuberculosis), eye, ear, nose and throat dis- 
orders, medical neurology, emergencies and metabolism. The Woman's 
Clinic has a capacity of 190 adults and 121 newborns and provides for ob- 
stetric and gynecological patients. During the past year 3,572 deliveries 
took place in this clinic. The Department of Pediatrics includes 86 beds 
with separate floors for the care of infants, children and premature babies. 
Facilities for the recreation of convalescent children offer opportunities for 
the student of nursing to study the development and guidance of convalescent 
as well as sick children. A nursery school will be opened within this De- 
partment during the fall of 1947. Here the student will work with and 
observe the development of the normal child, and will thus be better able 
to evaluate deviations from the normal which accompany illness. The 
Payne Whitney Clinic for psychiatric care has a bed capacity of 101 patients 
and offers participation in hydrotherapy, occupational and recreational 
therapy as part of the experience in the care of the mentally ill. The close 
connection between the psychiatric medical staff and the medical staffs 
of the other clinical departments on a consultation basis gives the student 
an opportunity to study the mental manifestations of illness throughout 
her experience in the Hospital. 



Out-Patient Services 

The Out-Patient Department of the Hospital provides excellent oppor- 
tunity for the study of ambulatory patients on all services. Last year there 
were 281,628 visits to this Department, an average of 950 patients each 
clinic day. The Out-Patient Department gives opportunity for participation 
in the consultation service for expectant mothers, mothers' classes, family 
studies, nutrition conferences, special aspects of the treatment and follow-up 
on venereal diseases and many activities in the care of ambulatory patients. 

Public Health Affiliations 

Cooperation with the Visiting Nurse Service of New York, the Depart- 
ment of Educational Nursing of the Community Service Society of New 
York and other community agencies, affords experience in the nursing care 
and health teaching of patients in their homes. The Kips Bay-Yorkville 
Health Center, the Lenox Hill Neighborhood House, and the Guggenheim 
Dental Clinic, all located within two blocks of the Hospital, offer convenient 
opportunity for student observations of community health programs. 

The Social Service Department of The New York Hospital participates 
in the nursing course through the integration of social service in the pro- 
gram of study. 



REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION 
AND GRADUATION 

REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION 

All students enter the School of Nursing on the recommendation of the 
faculty Committee on Admissions which reviews all applications. Since 
nursing requires women of integrity, of high intelligence and with a deep 
interest in public service, those candidates are selected whose credentials 
indicate high rank in scholarship, personal fitness for nursing, maturity 
and good general health. 

Educational Requisites 

The minimum educational requisites for admission are satisfactory com- 
pletion of at least two years of college (60 credits exclusive of physical 
education). The applicant may have taken her college work at Cornell 
University, Ithaca, New York, or at any university or senior or junior 
college accredited by the Association of American Universities or by one 
of the regional associations of colleges and secondary schools. 



Because the work of the nurse requires that she have an understanding 
of human reactions and of social factors influencing community develop- 
ment, that she be able to express herself well and participate in community- 
planning for nursing services, it is important that she obtain a sound back- 
ground in history, psychology and other social sciences, as well as in litera- 
ture, English and foreign languages. With the exception of psychology, 
indicated below, specific requirements in these subjects are not laid down 
because a variety of satisfactory combinations can be accepted. A sound 
two-year liberal arts program serves as a foundation on which to build all 
professional advancement. 

Physical sciences are important in the preparation for admission, but 
should not be taken at the expense of the subjects referred to above. Ob- 
viously, the young woman who can devote more than two years to her 
liberal arts preparation has more leeway to include several science courses 
in her college work as well as further general academic courses. Unques- 
tionably this would be desirable in preparation for many positions in the 
field of nursing. 



Credit Requirements for 1948 

Beginning with the class entering in the fall of 1948 all applicants are 
required to have completed college courses in the following physical and 
social sciences before admission to the School of Nursing: 

Chemistry (including laboratory) 6 credit hours 

Biological science (including laboratory) 6 credit hours 

Psychology 3 credit hours 

High school students will be guided in the selection of their high school 
curriculum by the entrance requirements of the college of their choice. The 
high school program should be devoted to English, history, mathematics, 
science and foreign languages. 



APPLICATION FOR ADMISSION 

A blank for formal application for admission to the School of Nursing, 
containing full instructions, may be obtained by returning the form at the 
back of this bulletin to the Dean of the Cornell University-New York 
Hospital School of Nursing, 525 East Sixty-eighth Street, New York 21, 
N. Y. As one measure of suitability for nursing, certain psychological tests 
are required at the time of application. The applicant is asked to meet the 
charge of approximately $5.00 for these tests. 

io 



Arrangements for a personal interview will be made with the applicant 
whose record shows promise of meeting the requirements of the school. 
She will meet with a member of the Committee on Admissions of the school 
in New York, or if this is not practicable, with an alumna or other qualified 
person designated by the committee and living in the vicinity of the appli- 
cant. 

Candidates for admission must make a deposit of $25-00 upon notification 
of acceptance to the school. The full amount is credited toward fees payable 
at registration. The deposit is not refundable if the candidate withdraws 
her application. 

It is desirable that prospective applicants enroll with the school as early 
as possible, so that they may receive assistance in planning their programs 
in high school and college to gain the best possible educational background 
preparatory to entering the School of Nursing. To be assured consideration, 
formal application should be made by the end of the first college year, if 
the applicant plans to enter this school after her second college year. Accep- 
tance to the school is final only after all requirements have been completed 
satisfactorily. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR PROMOTION AND GRADUATION 

The established system of grading is a scale of F to A, with D as the lowest 
passing grade. An average of C for a given term is required for promotion 
without condition. A grade of C is required in the courses Nursing Arts I, 
Nursing Arts II, Pharmacology I. A grade below C in any clinical field of 
nursing practice or a term average which is less than C places a student on 
warning. This must be removed by the end of the next term to insure further 
promotion. A student on warning is ineligible to hold office in student 
organizations. 

A grade of I (Incomplete) is assigned if the work of a course is not com- 
pleted because of illness or unavoidable absence and if, in the judgment of 
the instructor, the student has shown evidence that she can complete the 
course satisfactorily in a reasonable length of time. 

An F (Failure) in any given subject may necessitate withdrawal from the 
school unless the student's scholarship is exceptional in other respects, in 
which case repetition of the course may be recommended by the instructor. 

No more than one re-examination will be permitted in the case of failure 
in the midterm and/or final examination in a course, and only upon the 
recommendation of the instructor and approval by the Dean. In case a 
re-examination is permitted it is the responsibility of the student to arrange 
with the instructor for a plan of study preparatory to it. A charge of $2.00 
will be made for each re-examination. 

A cumulative average of C for three years' work is required by graduation. 

ii 



The school reserves the privilege of retaining in the school only those 
students who, in the judgment of the faculty, satisfy the requirements of 
scholarship, health and personal suitability for the nursing profession. 

ADVANCED STANDING 

A student who has received her baccalaureate degree before admission 
may apply for a reduction in total time in clinical experience, thus reducing 
her time in the school by two to six months. An average of B in theory 
and practice throughout the course is necessary for favorable consideration. 
Exemption must be requested during the last term of the second year. 

DEGREE AND DIPLOMA 

The degree of Bachelor of Science in Nursing will be granted by Cornell 
University and a diploma in nursing by The New York Hospital, upon 
recommendation of the faculty of the School of Nursing, to candidates who 
have completed satisfactorily the prescribed course in nursing. 

Any students admitted prior to establishment of the entrance requirement of two 
years of college for all students and who did not present two years of college prepara- 
tion acceptable to the University for admission to the degree program are candidates 
for the diploma only. 



ACCREDITATION OF THE SCHOOL 

This school is accredited by the New York State Department of Educa- 
tion and by the National League of Nursing Education. It is also an active 
member of the Association of Collegiate Schools of Nursing. 



(9^g) 



STATE REGISTRATION FOR GRADUATES 

Graduates are eligible for admission to the examination for licensure 
administered by the Regents of the State of New York and are expected to 
take such an examination immediately upon completion of the course. In 
New York citizenship, or declared intention of becoming a citizen, is re- 
quired. If citizenship is not completed within seven years from the declara- 
tion of intention, state licensure is revoked. If she prefers, the graduate may 
take State Board examinations in the state where she expects to practice 
rather than in New York State. 

12. 



FEES AND EXPENSES 

Fees and other expenses which must be met by the student are as follows: 

First Second Third 

fees: Year Year Year Total 

Matriculation $11.00 $11.00 

Administration 20.00 20.00 

Tuition 100.00 $50.00 $50.00 200.00 

Laboratory 25.00 25.00 

. Public Health Affiliation 1.00 1.00 60.00 62.00 

Chemistry Breakage 5-00 5-00 

Library 2.00 1.50 1.50 5.00 

Health Service 10.00 5-00 5.00 20.00 

Graduation 20.00 20.00 

Student Organization 5-25 5-25 5-25 15-75 



other expenses (Subject to variation): 
Aprons and accessories of uni- 



$179.25 $62.75 $141.75 $383-75 



forms 


$ 33-25 

10.00 

5-00 

15.00 

10.00 

40.00 
1.00 

2.00 


$ 5-00 
2.00 


10.00 

5-00 
30.00 


$ 33.25 


Uniform shoes 


20.00 


Uniform sweater 

Uniform cape (optional) 

Gymnasium suits 


5-00 
15-00 
10.00 


Books, keys, bandage scissors 
and miscellaneous (approx.) 

Rental laboratory coat 

Miscellaneous expenses in con- 
nection with field trips, etc . 


50.00 
1.00 

34.00 



$116.25 $ 7.00 $ 45-00 $168.25 
total fees and expenses $295-50 $69-75 $186.75 $552.00 

METHOD OF PAYMENT 

None of the articles listed should be obtained before admission to the 
school. A list of personal equipment will be sent to each student when 
accepted for admission. 

Upon acceptance for admission a deposit of $25-00 is required. This is 
credited toward the tuition for the first year but is not refundable if appli- 

13 



cation is withdrawn. The $100.00 tuition for the first year is payable $25.00 
upon acceptance, $50.00 at registration, and $25.00 at the beginning of the 
second term. 

Breakage fee is refundable if no breakage is incurred. Graduation fee is 
payable at the beginning of the third term of the third year and is refundable 
if student is not graduated. Student organization fee is payable to class 
treasurer. Estimated expenses for books include approximately $10.00 
optional. 

MAINTENANCE 
The student has no expense for room, board or laundry during the course. 
The necessary dresses and caps of the school uniform are also provided 
without expense. Other items of the uniform for which the student pays 
are listed above under "Other Expenses." In case of illness, limited infirmary 
and hospital care is provided without cost. 

SCHOLARSHIPS AND OTHER FINANCIAL AID 

Admission Scholarships 
Five scholarships of $100 each will be offered to students entering in the 
fall of 1948 on the basis of all-round good record as indicated by academic 
work, participation in school or community activities, special abilities and 
personal qualities indicating promise. All students applying for admission 
are considered for these scholarships, but students who are interested are 
encouraged to so indicate in their applications for admission. Scholarships 
are awarded by the Executive Faculty on the recommendation of the Ad- 
missions Committee. 

Scholarships at the End of the First Year 
A few scholarships will be available at the end of the first year. These 
will be granted on the basis of good scholarship and need for financial assis- 
tance. Application should be made to the Dean of the School by August 31, 
near the end of the first year. Scholarships are awarded by the Executive 
Faculty on the joint recommendation of the Scholarship Committee and 
the First Year Promotions Committee. 

Loan Funds 
Student loan funds have been established and are available after the first 
term to students who need financial aid and show promise in nursing. A 
student who is unable to meet the initial expenses of the first year and who 
in all respects stands high in meeting admission requirements will also be 
considered on an individual basis for possible financial assistance. Appli- 
cation should be made to the Dean of the School. 

i4 



Irene Sutliffe Scholarship Fund 

Through the generosity and foresight of the alumnae of the school and 
in honor of Irene Sutliffe, the Director of the School from 1886 to 1902, 
scholarship grants are available to graduates of the school for postgraduate 
study. 



HEALTH SERVICE 

The school maintains a health service for its students under the general 
direction of a committee of the faculty with a physician appointed to the 
staff of the school. Upon admission to the school a physical examination 
by the school physician and a chest X-ray are required.. Subsequently a 
chest X-ray is required every six months. 

Vaccinations against typhoid fever and smallpox will be required of all 
students before admission to the school. Schick and Dick tests and immuniza- 
tion for positive reaction to the Schick test will be required of all students 
after admission to the school. Mantoux tests will be given during the pre- 
clinical period and for those who are negative will be repeated at regular 
intervals. In addition B, C, G vaccine is provided. 

A well-equipped infirmary with necessary staff is maintained in the Nurses' 
Residence. Gratuitous infirmary care for minor illnesses will be limited to 
four weeks at any one time in the case of all students. For more serious ill- 
nesses students will be cared for gratuitously in the hospital for not more 
than two weeks at any one time for the first-year students, and not more than 
four weeks at any one time for second and third year students. Expenses for 
special nursing care and special therapies must be borne by the student or 
her family. Dental care is available at minimum cost. 



(5^g) 



VACATIONS AND ABSENCES 

A vacation of four weeks is given in each of the first two years and two 
weeks in the third. Students who have an exemption of time are not granted 
a vacation in the third year. All vacations are arranged to conform to the 
requirements of the educational program. 

As a result of absences the repetition of a course of study or special exami- 
nations may be required, class registration may be changed and in necessary 
instances nursing practice will have to be made up. 

J 5 



ACTIVITIES 

RESIDENCE FACILITIES 

Students live in the Nurses' Residence, a sixteen-story fireproof building 
adjacent to the hospital. Every effort has been made in the construction 
and equipment of the residence to provide for the normal and healthy life 
of students and faculty. 

Comfortable lounges, reading, reception and dining rooms are located 
on the first and ground floors. Students have attractively furnished single 
rooms with running water and each of the eight student floors is equipped 
with ample baths, showers and toilet facilities, a laundry and a common 
sitting room with adjoining kitchenette for informal gatherings. 

RECREATIONAL FACILITIES 

Believing that the education of young women today must include activi- 
ties relative to healthful social relationships, generous provision for this 
development in the life of the student has been made. 

An excellent browsing library of fiction and biography includes both 
current and standard works and many magazines of general interest. A 
branch of the New York Public Library is located within a few blocks of 
the Hospital. 

In addition to the ample lounges for informal and formal use, a large, 
well-equipped gymnasium-auditorium is located in the south wing of the 
first floor of the residence. Other game rooms, sun porches, and a hobby 
room are also available for general use. Students who have had preparation 
in music are urged to keep up their interest and participation. Student 
activities arranged jointly with the Cornell University Medical College are 
a regular part of the recreation. 

By arrangement with a nearby school, an indoor swimming pool and an 
additional large gymnasium are regularly available. Through the Students' 
Athletic Association arrangements are made for joining with other schools 
of nursing in special sports events. Beach equipment and an outdoor grill 
are available through the House Committee. 

To insure the full benefit of proper use of these facilities a Residence 
Director and well-qualified assistants for special activities are in charge. 
House activities are planned by the House Committee, which is made up 
of representatives of those living in the Residence, of staff members living 
out and of alumnae. 

The cultural opportunities of New York City are almost limitless in 
music, art, ballet, theatre and libraries. Through the House Committee 
students and graduates enjoy the benefits of such opportunities as mem- 
bership in the Metropolitan Museum of Art, American Museum of Natural 



History, Metropolitan Opera Guild, Institute of Arts and Sciences and the 
Student and Professional Ticket Service. 

An annual activity fee, paid by students and graduates alike, supports 
the varied activities. 

SCHOOL GOVERNMENT 

The school has a cooperative government in which the students carry a 
responsible and active part. All students belong to the Student Organi- 
zation which functions with the Faculty Committee on Student Affairs in 
all matters relating to social and professional conduct and discipline. 

All students entering the school accept the privileges and obligations 
of self-government under the honor system, which is understood to apply 
to all matters of personal and professional conduct. 

ALUMNAE ASSOCIATION 

The Cornell University-New York Hospital School of Nursing Alumnae 
Association, originally the Alumnae Association of The New York Hos- 
pital School of Nursing, was organized in 1893- It was one of the ten alum- 
nae associations which helped to bring about the national professional 
organization of nurses first known as the Nurses Associated Alumnae of the 
United States and Canada. This is now the American Nurses' Association. 
In 1945 the Alumnae Association became a part of the Cornell University 
Alumni Association. 

One of the lounges of the Residence is known as the Alumnae Room, 
and alumnae meetings and many alumnae functions are held in this room. 



CURRICULUM 

The curriculum covers a period of three calendar years, the full time 
being spent in residence at the school with the exception of vacations, 
which total ten weeks. Each year is divided into three terms, two of sixteen 
weeks, and the summer term of twenty weeks, which includes vacation. 

In each clinical service related classes, clinical conferences and bedside 
instruction are given concurrently with practice. In several of the clinical 
services the student receives experience in evening and night duty so that 
she may have the complete picture of the care of the patient and his needs. 
An introduction to community nursing and to the various agencies assisting 
at the time of illness is provided through visits with the staff members of 
community health agencies, observation in various community organiza- 

17 



tions, conferences centered around family health and participation in the 
referral of patients requiring nursing care after discharge from the Hospital. 

In the first year, the first term and a half are devoted primarily to class 
and laboratory assignments with a very limited amount of nursing practice 
in the pavilions of the Hospital. During the remainder of the first year the 
student is assigned to the Medical and Surgical Departments for theory and 
practice in these clinical fields. 

The three terms of the second year are devoted to classes and practice 
in pediatric, obstetric, gynecological, communicable disease and operating 
room nursing and to experience in the planning and serving of diets. Assign- 
ments are made to the main clinical departments for sixteen-week periods 
during which students are rotated to the different divisions of the depart- 
ment. In the assignments to pediatrics and obstetrics, out-patient experience 
is included and emphasis is placed on disease prevention and health 
instruction. 

The third year is divided into six terms of eight weeks each. One term 
is spent in the Department of Psychiatry, one term in advanced assignments 
relative to the nursing care of medical and surgical patients in the pavilions 
of the Hospital and one term in community nursing, either in the Out- 
Patient Department of the Hospital or with the Visiting Nurse Service of 
New York. 

In accordance with the requirements of the United States Cadet Nurse 
Corps program, in which this school cooperated, the last three terms of 
the third year are devoted to supervised practice, and theory is limited to 
conferences related to the care of specific patients. During this time the 
student may elect to have four weeks of experience in a service in which she 
is especially interested. This program will be in effect until October, 1948, 
when a change in the plan for the third year is anticipated. 

During the clinical terms students are scheduled for a forty-four hour 
week which includes all classes and nursing practice assignments. 



FIRST YEAR 



Orientation Program 

Anatomy 60 

Physiology 50 

Chemistry 55 

Microbiology 50 

Clinical Pathology 20 

Social and Economic Aspects of Health and 

Disease 30 

History of Nursing 24 

Professional Adjustments 1 15 

Psychology of Deviate Behavior 15 

Nursing Arts I 158 

Nursing Arts II 201 



Hours of Weeks of 

Class and Practice* 

Laboratory QApprox?) 
17 



Nutrition and Cookery 

Diet Therapy 

Pharmacology I 

Pharmacology II 

Medicine 

Communicable Diseases 

Medical Nursing (including Communicable 

Disease Nursing) 

Surgery 

Surgical Nursing (including Eye, Ear, Nose and 

Throat) 

Physical Education 



30 
30 
15 
30 
39 
15 

45 
38 

30 
55 



Total first year 1022 



12 



12 



24 



*Two or more hours a week of bedside instruction and conferences, which approxi- 
mate a total of 244 hours in the three years, are included in the practice periods. 



19 



SECOND YEAR 

Hours of Weeks of 
Class and 'Practices- 
Laboratory QApprox.^) 

Pediatrics , 20 

Pediatric Nursing 50 16 

Development of Behavior in Children 30 

Obstetrics and Gynecology 30 

Obstetric and Gynecological Nursing. 30 16 

Medical Nursing (Communicable Disease) .. 4 

Diet Therapy Practice . . 4 

Operative Technique 15 8 

Physical Education 32 

Total second year 207 48* 

THIRD YEAR 

Psychiatry 30 

Psychiatric Nursing 30 16 

Public Health Nursing 20 8 

(Students are assigned for practice in the Out- 

Patient Department of the Hospital or with 

the Visiting Nurse Service of New York.) 

Medical Nursing 8 9 

Surgical Nursing 8 9 

Emergency Nursing 22 

Private Patient Nursing . . 4 

Professional Adjustments II 15 

Elective . . 4 

Physical Education 32 

Total third year 165 50 

Grand totals ! 1394 122 

*Two or more hours a week of bedside instruction and conferences, which approxi- 
mate a total of 244 hours in the three years, are included in the practice periods. 






zo 



DESCRIPTION OF COURSES 

BIOLOGICAL AND PHYSICAL SCIENCES 

100. ANATOMY. This course includes both gross and microscopical anatomy. The 
gross anatomy is taught by lectures, demonstrations, and student dissection of the 
cadaver. The microscopical work is directly correlated with the gross dissection and 
includes a detailed study of prepared slides. Significant embryological information 
is included in the lectures. 

60 Hours, First Year. Dr. Hinsey, Dr. Geohegan, Dr. Berry. 

101. PHYSIOLOGY. The course is directed toward an understanding of the prin- 
ciples involved in the functioning of the human body and the integration of its 
various systems. It is an essential prerequisite to the study of nursing arts, nutrition 
and pathology. Lectures, recitations, demonstrations, and laboratory. 

50 Hours, First Year. Dr. DuBois, Miss Rynbergen, Miss Iba. 

102. CHEMISTRY. A course designed to acquaint students with some of the funda- 
mental principles of physiological chemistry as these apply to nursing practice. 
Studies of water balance, the digestion and metabolism of food and the composition 
of blood, milk, and urine are included. Lectures, recitations, demonstrations and 
Jaboratory. 

55 Hours, First Year. Dr. DuVigneaud, Miss Rynbergen, Dr. Summerson, Mrs. 
Lee, Miss Iba. 

103. MICROBIOLOGY. An introduction to the study of microorganisms, particu- 
larly the microbial agents of disease. Sources, modes of spread and prevention of 
infectious diseases; principles and practice of asepsis. Applications of bacteriology 
and immunology to the diagnosis, prevention and treatment of infectious diseases. 
50 Hours, First Year. Dr. Neill, Dr. Hehre. 

104. CLINICAL PATHOLOGY. A brief orientation course designed to acquaint the 
student with some of the more common laboratory procedures and to indicate the 
relation of the clinical laboratories to hospital activities. It presents pathologic 
changes in infections and neoplasms, hematology, blood grouping and transfusions, 
urinalysis and parasitology with practice in a few of the techniques. The blood group 
of each student is ascertained and recorded. Lectures, conferences and laboratory. 
20 Hours, First Year. Dr. Stillman. 

SOCIAL SCIENCES 

110. PSYCHOLOGY OF DEVIATE BEHAVIOR. A study of the deviations in 
behavior of adults and children, due to organic and sociological factors, and of the 
nursing care necessary in assisting patients in making more adequate adjustments 
during illness. The principles of mental hygiene are emphasized. Lectures and reci- 
tations. 

Pre-requisite: General Psychology — (For the fall of 1947 special arrangements will 
be made for any students who have not had a course in General Psychology). 
15 Hours, First Year. Instructor to be announced. 

2.1 



111. SOCIAL AND HEALTH ASPECTS OF NURSING. Study of the patient as an 
individual conditioned by psychological and cultural influences. Interrelationship 
of individual, family and community health, and the work of the nurse in prevention 
of disease and the promotion of health. Lectures, conferences, reports, excursions 
to community agencies. 

30 Hours, First Year. Mrs. Overholser, Miss Soule. 

112. PUBLIC HEALTH NURSING. An introduction to the study of health problems 
and services in relation to the family and community. Consideration is given to the 
preparation of public health nurses and to the role of the nurse in the total health 
program. 

20 Hours, Third Year. Dr. Smillie and Mrs. Overholser. 

113-A. PRACTICE IN PUBLIC HEALTH NURSING. Those students who do not 
have experience in the Out-Patient Department of the Hospital during the third 
year, will spend two months with the Visiting Nurse Service of New York. This 
voluntary agency, formerly known as the Henry Street Visiting Nurse Service, pro- 
vides a generalized public health nursing service including bedside care of the sick. 
Through carefully graded observation, case conferences and supervised practice, 
the student assumes increasing responsibility in relation to health care for a small, 
selected group of families. 
Eight Weeks, Third Year. 

113-B. PRACTICE IN PUBLIC HEALTH NURSING. Those students who do not 
have experience with the Visiting Nurse Service of New York will be assigned to 
two months of practice in the Out-Patient Department of the Hospital. Included 
in this experience are visits to community agencies, contact with the home through 
community nursing agencies, family study and related conferences with members 
of the Social Service Department. 
Eight Weeks, Third Year. 

114. HISTORY OF NURSING. A survey of nursing from its early beginnings to 
modern times. Nursing history considered in relation to the development of modern 
concepts of democracy and science. 

24 Hours, First Year. Miss MacLean. 

115. PROFESSIONAL ADJUSTMENTS I. Consideration of the philosophical and 
ethical foundations of conduct and their application to the profession of nursing. 
Problems related to group life and adjustments to patients and co-workers are pre- 
sented by students for discussion and analysis. 

15 Hours, First Year. Mrs. Overholser. 

116. PROFESSIONAL ADJUSTMENTS II. Through a general survey of the nursing 
field, the student has an opportunity to study the trends in the profession, the need 
and opportunities for specialized preparation, the importance and types of legisla- 
tion, the activities of professional organizations and the obligations of their members. 
Lectures and conferences. 

15 Hours, Third Year. Miss Dunbar, Miss Parker and special lecturers. 

117. PHYSICAL EDUCATION. It is a major aim of this course to provide each 
student with the knowledge of good body mechanics in work and play. Through 

2.2. 



individual and group sports, she has the opportunity to become adept in the activity 
which she enjoys the most. A reasonable degree of skill in one or more sports is an 
important factor in the development of a happy recreational life for the individual. 
55 Hours, First Year; 32 Hours, Second Year; 32 Hours, Third Year. Miss McDermott 
and Assistant. 

NURSING AND ALLIED ARTS— GENERAL 

120. ORIENTATION. This course gives the beginning student a general concept 
of the field of nursing and of the responsibilities and obligations of the individual 
who chooses this profession. It includes lectures on personality development, empha- 
sizing the importance of the physical and mental health of the nurse as it relates 
to her personal life and is reflected in her work. 

17 Hours, First Year; 1 Hour, Second Year; 1 Hour, Third Year. Miss Dunbar, 
Miss Lyons, Mrs. Overholser, Dr. Doty, Dr. Lansdown, Miss McDermott, 
Mrs. Jordan, Miss Lambert. 

121. NURSING ARTS I. This course is designed to give the student an understand- 
ing of the basic physical needs of individuals and of how best these may be met in 
relation to the nursing care of a patient. There is emphasis upon desirable nurse- 
patient relationships, and instruction is given in the simpler nursing procedures. 
Practice includes the application of basic principles of nursing in the Nursing Arts 
Laboratory, in the Surgical Supply Room and in the care of convalescent patients 
on the pavilions of the Hospital. 

158 Hours, First Year. Miss MacLean, Miss Hunter, Miss Zorn. 

122. NURSING ARTS II. A course designed to give the student an understanding 
of advanced nursing principles and procedures, and to assist in the development 
and perfection of skills. It is correlated with lectures on the medical and surgical 
aspects of disease, and with instruction in nursing care pertinent to these conditions. 
Practice includes application of advanced nursing principles and procedures in the 
Nursing Arts Laboratory, and in the care of patients on the pavilions of the Hospital. 
There is opportunity for observation of nursing in the Out-Patient Department. 

201 Hours, First Year. Miss MacLean, Miss Hunter. 

123. EMERGENCY NURSING. This course deals with the application of nursing 
principles to emergency situations in the home and community. Lectures and demon- 
strations. First Aid certificate granted by American Red Cross. 

22 Hours, Third Year. Dr. Redden. 

124. PHARMACOLOGY I. Designed to familiarize the student with the systems 
used in weighing and measuring drugs, methods of making solutions and calcu- 
lating dosages. It stresses the nurse's responsibility in the administration of medicines. 
15 Hours, First Year. Miss Kemper. 

125. PHARMACOLOGY II. A course planned to help the student acquire knowledge 
of the facts and principles of drug therapy and of the responsibilities of the nurse 
in the administration of medicines. It includes a study of the important and commonly 
used drugs, their physiological and therapeutic actions, dosage, administration, 
idiosyncracies and toxic symptoms. Emphasis is given to the accurate administration 
of drugs and the careful observation of their effects. 

30 Hours, First Year. Dr. Cattell, Miss Kemper. 



NUTRITION 

130. NUTRITION AND COOKERY. A basic course in normal adult nutrition and 
in food preparation. (The nutrition requirements in childhood and in pregnancy are 
discussed during the student's practice on pediatric and obstetric services in the 
second year.) 

30 Hours, First Year. Miss Rynbergen, Miss Iba. 

131. DIET THERAPY. A course designed to present the underlying principles in the 
treatment of disease by means of special dietaries; given concurrently with the lec- 
tures in Medical and Surgical Diseases. This course is supplemented by conference 
work during the student's practice on medical and surgical services. Lectures, reci- 
tations and laboratory. 

30 Hours, First Year. Miss Rynbergen, Miss Iba. 

132. PRACTICE OF DIET THERAPY. The application of the principles of diet 
therapy to the care of patients in supervised practice on the pavilions of the Hospital 
and in the Out-Patient Clinic. 

4 Weeks, Second Year; 48 Hours, Third Year. Miss Stephenson, Miss Rynbergen, 
Miss Iba, Miss Tillotson, Miss Richmond. 



MEDICAL NURSING 

140. MEDICINE. Medical aspects of diseases are considered in these lectures and 
clinics. Material presented will supplement, emphasize and interpret required read- 
ing covering etiology, sources of infection, symptomatology, usual course pathology, 
complications, treatment, prognosis and prevention. 

39 Hours, First Year. Dr. Barr and staff. 

141. COMMUNICABLE DISEASES. A study of communicable diseases, including 
tuberculosis. Special emphasis is placed upon etiology, modes of transmission and 
prevention. Lectures and clinics. 

15 Hours, First Year. Dr. Barr and staff. 

142. PRINCIPLES OF MEDICAL NURSING INCLUDING COMMUNICABLE 
DISEASE NURSING. A study by lectures and demonstrations of the principles and 
methods of nursing which are specific to this division of nursing practice. In the 
third year emphasis is placed upon managerial and teaching problems and current 
developments requiring new methods of treatment. 

45 Hours, First Year; 8 Hours, Third Year. Miss Klein, Miss Kemper. 

143. PRACTICE OF MEDICAL NURSING INCLUDING COMMUNICABLE DIS- 
EASE NURSING. Supervised practice and study of the application of medical nurs- 
ing principles and methods to the care of patients on the medical pavilions of the 
Hospital. In addition, students study and practice medical aseptic nursing as related 
to the care of patients suffering from communicable diseases including tuberculosis. 
Practice includes care of patients and managerial experience during day, evening 
and night. Demonstrations and conferences. 

25 Weeks, First, Second, and Third Years (includes 384 hours of communicable 
disease nursing). Miss Klein, Miss Kemper, Miss Hills, Miss McNeer and staff. 

M 



144. PRACTICE IN CARE OF PRIVATE PATIENTS. Application of principles of 
medical and surgical nursing to the care of private patients. 
4 Weeks, Third Year. Mrs. Miller, Miss Nielsen, and staff. 

SURGICAL NURSING 

150. SURGERY. Surgical aspects of diseases are presented in these lectures and 
clinics. Factors determining the need for surgical interference are discussed and the 
major steps in the operation outlined. Special emphasis is placed upon signs, symp- 
toms and observations which should be made both preceding and following operation. 
38 Hours, First Year. Dr. Glenn and staff. 

151. PRINCIPLES OF SURGICAL NURSING. Through lectures and demonstrations 
students are taught the principles and methods of surgical asepsis and the nursing of 
surgical patients. In the third year emphasis is placed upon managerial and teaching 
problems, and current developments requiring new methods of treatment. 

30 Hours, First Year; 8 Hours, Third Year. Miss Klein, Miss Fedder, Miss Harmon, 
Miss Swanwick, Miss Daniels, Mrs. Ginsberg. 

152. PRACTICE OF SURGICAL NURSING. Supervised practice and study of the 
application of nursing principles to the care of patients on surgical pavilions of the 
Hospital. Practice includes care of patients and managerial experience during the 
day, evening and night. Demonstrations and conferences. 

21 Weeks, First and Third Years. Miss Klein, Miss Fedder, Miss Harmon, Mrs. 
Ginsberg, Miss Hills, Miss Daniels, Miss Swanwick, Miss McNeer and staff. 

153. OPERATIVE TECHNIQUE. This course is designed to give the student a 
thorough understanding of surgical aseptic technique. She is given an opportunity to 
observe and assist with operative procedures and to gain an appreciation of the 
qualities and abilities essential to effective nursing in this field. 

15 Hours, lectures, demonstrations and conferences; 8 Weeks of practice, Second Year. 
Miss Carbery and staff. 

OBSTETRIC AND GYNECOLOGICAL NURSING 

160. OBSTETRICS AND GYNECOLOGY. This course deals with the clinical, 
anatomical, physiological and pathological aspects of pregnancy, labor and the 
puerperium, as well as of the female genital organs. Consideration is given to nutri- 
tional needs, psychosomatic aspects in the prevention of complications, family- 
sociologic relationships in child bearing, the nature development and adjustment of 
the newborn. 

30 Hours, Second Year. Dr. Stander and staff, Miss Rynbergen, Miss Iba. 

161. PRINCIPLES OF OBSTETRIC AND GYNECOLOGICAL NURSING. This 
course emphasizes the importance of prenatal observation, instruction, and infant 
care, obstetric and gynecologic procedures, current modes and trends in therapy. 
30 Hours, Second Year. Miss Hickcox, Miss Walters, Mrs. Howell, Mrs. Thomas, 

Miss Dust an, Miss Lipton. 

162. PRACTICE OF OBSTETRIC AND GYNECOLOGICAL NURSING. Students 
observe and care for infants and .obstetric and gynecological patients under super- 

^5 



vision in the pavilions, nurseries, labor and delivery rooms and Out-Patient Depart- 
ment. Nursing practice, nursing care studies, conferences and field trips are 
supplementary features of the course. 

16 Weeks, Second Year. Miss Hickcox, Mrs. Howell, Mrs. Thomas, Miss Walters, 
Miss Lipton, Miss Robson, Mrs. Sillcox, Miss Kellerman. 



PEDIATRIC NURSING 

170. PEDIATRICS. This course presents a study of the representative diseases of 
infancy and childhood and of the many factors which contribute to health and 
diseases. 

20 Hours, Second Year. Dr. Levine and staff. 

171. DEVELOPMENT OF BEHAVIOR IN CHILDREN. A study of the normal 
child and his behavior. The susceptibility of the child's behavior responses to the 
various details of family life and of school will be emphasized. Lectures and reci- 
tations. 

30 Hours, Second Year. Instructor to be announced. 

172. PRINCIPLES OF PEDIATRIC NURSING. The basic principles in the care 
of sick infants and children are taught in conjunction with the social, educational 
and nutritional aspects of their treatment and behavior as normal children. 

50 Hours, Second Year. Miss Schubert, Miss Ferguson, Miss Rebentisch, Miss 
Woodfall and staff, Miss Rynbergen, Miss Iba. 

173. PRACTICE OF PEDIATRIC NURSING. This consists of supervised experience 
in aseptic nursing methods in the care of infants and children in the pavilion, for- 
mula laboratory, premature nursery and Out-Patient Department. Case studies and 
conferences. 

16 Weeks, Second Year. Miss Schubert, Miss Ferguson, Miss Rebentisch, Miss 
Steigerwalt, Miss Woodfall and staff, Miss Pearson. 



PSYCHIATRIC NURSING 

180. PSYCHIATRY. A course of study designed to acquaint students with psycho- 
pathic conditions, their etiology, pathology and treatment. Included in this course 
is an historical survey of psychiatry and the mental hygiene movement; a discussion 
of the problems most frequently found in the different periods of human develop- 
ment: nursery school age, pre-puberty, adolescent, climactic and senile. An intro- 
duction to the techniques and social agencies available in helping people meet their 
problems. 

30 Hours, Third Year. Dr. Diethelm and staff. 

181. PRINCIPLES OF PSYCHIATRIC NURSING. This course is organized to give 
students an understanding of the basic principles in the nursing care of personality 
disorders and the nursing procedures used in their treatment. Emphasis is placed 
also upon the relation of emotional disturbances to physical illness and of early 
development to future adult life. Lectures, demonstrations, and clinics. 

30 Hours, Third Year. Miss Joinville, Miss Ratushny and staff, Miss Paige. 

z6 



182. PRACTICE OF PSYCHIATRIC NURSING. The application of the principles 
of psychiatric nursing through supervised practice in and conferences on the care 
of adults both in the In-Patient and Out-Patient Departments. Behavior studies and 
case studies. Two eight-week periods. 

15 Weeks, Third Year. Miss Gnau, Miss Joinville, Miss Ratushny, Mrs. Whitaker 
and staff. 

183. SPECIAL THERAPEUTICS IN PSYCHIATRIC NURSING. An opportunity 
is given the student for observation and practice in hydrotherapy, occupational and 
recreational therapies, with special emphasis on needs of the individual patient. 
Conferences and supervised practice. 

1 Week, Third Year. Miss Spargo, Miss Brindle. 



<3%g) 



2-7 



ADMINISTRATIVE AND 
TEACHING PERSONNEL 



JOINT ADMINISTRATIVE BOARD 
OF THE UNIVERSITY AND THE HOSPITAL 



William Harding Jackson, Chairman 

Edmund Ezra Day, President of the ] 
University [ 

Neal Dow Becker 



Board of Trustees 

of 

V ' tT'tj" I Cornell University 

Joseph P. Ripley J J 

William H arding J acksou, Pre side?it 1 Board of Governors 

Henry S. Sturgis, Treasurer \ of 

Langdon P. Marvin J _ The New York Hospital 

John W. Davis 

SCHOOL OF NURSING COUNCIL 

Dr. Edmund E. Day, Chairman President of the University 

Neal Dow Becker Trustee of the University 

A. Conger Goodyear Governor of the Hospital 

Langdon P. Marvin Governor of the Hospital 

Dr. Lucile Allen Counselor of Women, Cornell University 

Mrs. August Belmont Representative-at-Large 

Helen Daum* Director of the School of Nursing and Nursing Service, 

Flower Fifth Avenue Hospital 

Marian G. Randall Director of the Visiting Nurse Service of 

New York City 

Dr. Joseph C. Hinsey Dean of Cornell Medical College 

Dr. W. G. Smillie Professor of Public Health and Preventive Medicine, 

Cornell Medical College 

Dr. Henricus J. Stander President of the Medical Board of the Hospital 

Murray Sargent Director of The New York Hospital 

Virginia M. Dunbar Dean of the School of Nursing 



♦Appointed by the Alumnae Association. 

2.8 



ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICERS OF THE SCHOOL 

Edmund Ezra Day President of the University 

George Holland Sabine Vice-President of the University 

Virginia M. Dunbar Dean 

Bessie A. R. Parker Associate Dean 

Veronica Lyons Assistant Dean 

ASSISTANTS IN ADMINISTRATION 

Flora J. Bergstrom Librarian 

Helenmarie Matlin Registrar 

Virginia Faulkner Assistant Registrar 

Margaret E. Vogel Secretary 

Helexe Jamieson Jordan Director of Public Information 

FACULTY STANDING COMMITTEES AND CHAIRMEN 

Muriel Carbery Committee on Student Affairs 

Edna Fritz Committee on Graduate Courses 

Frances Boyle Committee on Affiliating Students 

Margery T. Overholser Committee on Student and Staff Health 

Veronica Lyons Committee on Records 

Mary E. Klein Committee on Admissions 

H. Rosalind MacLean Committee on Nursing Principles and Practices 

Veronica Lyons Committee on Curriculum 

Olive M. Reid Committee on Scholarship Aid and Student Loans 

M. Eva Poor Committee on Public Information 

Veronica Lyons Library Committee 

PROMOTION COMMITTEES 

Henderika J. Rynbergen First Year Students 

Ruth Woodfall Second Year Students 

Olive M . Reid Third Year Students 



2-9 



FACULTY 

Edmund Ezra Day, Ph.D., LL.D., President of the University 

EMERITUS PROFESSORS 
Harriet Frost, Professor of Public Health Nursing 
May Kennedy, Professor of Nursing 

PROFESSORS 

Virginia M. Dunbar, M.A., R.N., Professor of Nursing, Dean of the School of Nursing, 
Director of the Nursing Service. (A.B., Mount Holyoke College, South Hadley, 
Mass., 1919; Diploma in Nursing, Johns Hopkins Hospital School of Nursing, Balti- 
more, Md., 1923; M.A., Teachers College, Columbia University, New York, N. Y., 
1930. Diploma, Bedford College and Florence Nightingale International Foundation, 
London, England, 1936.) 

Bessie A. R. Parker, B.S., R.N., Professor of Nursing, Associate Dean of the School of 
Nursing, Associate Director of the Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Rhode Island 
Hospital Training School for Nurses, Providence, R. I., 1918; B.S., Teachers College, 
Columbia University, New York, N. Y., 1937.) 

ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS 

Verda F. Hickcox, B.S., R.N., Associate Professor of Obstetric and Gynecological Nursing, 
Head of Obstetric and Gynecological Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Presbyterian 
Hospital School of Nursing, Chicago, 111., 1916; B.S., Teachers College, Columbia 
University, New York, N. Y., 1927; Certificate in Midwifery, General Lying-in 
Hospital and School of Midwifery, London, England, 1929.) 

Veronica Lyons, M.A., R.N., Assistant Dean, Associate Professor of Nursing. (Di- 
ploma in Nursing, Johns Hopkins Hospital School of Nursing, Baltimore, Md., 
1927; B.S., Teachers College, Columbia University, New York, N. Y., 1936; M.A., 
ibid., 1947.) 

Elizabeth Moser, M.A., R.N., Associate Professor of Nursing, Assistant Director of the 
Nursing Service. (A.B., Bluffton College, Bluffton, Ohio, 1921; Diploma in Nursing, 
Johns Hopkins Hospital School of Nursing, Baltimore, Md., 1926; M.A., Teachers 
College, Columbia University, New York, N. Y., 1944.) 

Margery T. Overholser, M.A., R.N., Associate Professor of Public Health Nursing, 
Director of Public Health Nursing. (Diploma in Nursing, Wesley Memorial Hospital 
School of Nursing, Chicago, 111., 1922; B.S., Teachers College, Columbia University, 
New York, N. Y., 1927; M.A., ibid., 1944.) 

Olive M. Reid, A.B., R.N., Associate Professor of Out- Patient Nursing, Head of Out- 
Patient Nursing Service. (A.B., Western College for Women, Oxford, Ohio, 1916; 
Diploma in Nursing, Army School of Nursing, Washington, D. C, 1921.) 

Agnes Schubert, M.S., R.N., Associate Professor of Pediatric Nursing, Head of Pediatric 
Nursing Service. (B.S., Northwestern University, Evanston, 111., 1917; Diploma in 
Nursing, Western Reserve University School of Nursing, Cleveland, Ohio, 1926; 
M.S., Teachers College, Columbia University, New York, N. Y., 1932.) 

3° 



ASSISTANT PROFESSORS 

Muriel Carbery, A.B., R.N., Assistant Professor of Surgical Nursing, Head of Nursing 
Service in the General Operating Rooms. (A.B., Hunter College, New York, N. Y., 1933; 
Diploma in Nursing, The New York Hospital School of Nursing, New York, N. Y., 
1937.) 

Mary Elizabeth Klein, B.S., R.N., Assistant Professor of Medical and Surgical Nursing, 
Head of Medical and Surgical Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Hahnemann 
Hospital School of Nursing, Philadelphia, Pa., 1916; B.S., Teachers College, Columbia 
University, New York, N. Y., 1936.) 

Mary T. McDermott, M.A., Assistant Professor of Physical Education; Director, Nurses' 
Residence. (Diploma, Bouve Boston School of Physical Education, Boston, Mass., 
1916; B.S., New York University, New York, N. Y., 1930; M.A., ibid., 1932.) 

Sarah E. Moore, R.N., Assistant Professor of Nursing; Administrative Assistant, Day 
Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, The New York Hospital School of Nursing, 
New York, N. Y., 1913.) 

Henderika J. Rynbergen, M.S., Assistant Professor of Sciences. (B.S., Simmons Col- 
lege, Boston, Mass., 1922; M.S., Cornell University Medical College, New York, 
N. Y., 1938.) 

INSTRUCTORS 

Frances Lucretia Boyle, B.S., R.N., Instructor in Obstetrical Out-Patient Nursing; 
Supervisor, Obstetric Out-Patient Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Moses Taylor 
Hospital, Scranton, Pa., 1924; B.S., Teachers College, Columbia University, New 
York, N. Y., 1945.) 

Virginia Daniels, B.S., R.N., Instructor in Surgical Nursing; Supervisor, Surgical Nursing 
Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, Chicago, 111., 
1930; B.S., Teachers College, Columbia University, New York, N. Y., 1937.) 

Leone DeLelys, B.S., R.N., Instructor in Operating Room Technique; Assistant Supervisor, 
General Operating Rooms. (Diploma in Nursing, Strong Memorial Hospital, Rochester, 
N. Y., 1937; B.S., Teachers College, Columbia University, New York, N. Y., 1944.) 

*Laura C. Dustan, B.S., R.N., Instructor in Obstetric and Gynecological Nursing; Super- 
visor, Obstetric and Gynecological Nursing Service. (B.S., University of Vermont, 1940; 
M.N., Frances Payne Bolton School of Nursing, Western Reserve University, Cleve- 
land, Ohio, 1943; Nurse Midwifery Course, Maternity Center Association, New 
York, N. Y., 1946.) 

Helma Fedder, B.S., R.N., Instructor in Surgical Nursing; Supervisor, Surgical Nursing 
Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Washington University School of Nursing, St. Louis, 
Mo., 1933; B.S., University of Chicago, 1942.) 

Sarah M. Ferguson, B.S., R.N., Instructor in Pediatric Nursing; Supervisor, Pediatric 
Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Children's Hospital School of Nursing, Boston^ 
Mass., 1932; B.S., Teachers College, Columbia University, New York, N. Y., 1947.) 



* Appointment effective September 1, 1947. 

3 1 



Edna L. Fritz, M.A., R.N., Instructor in Charge of Graduate Programs. (Diploma in 
Nursing, Russell Sage College School of Nursing, Troy, N. Y., 1940; B.S., in Nursing, 
ibid., 1940; M.A., Teachers College, Columbia University, New York, N. Y., 1942.) 

Lilian Henderson Ginsberg, B.S., R.N., Instructor in Surgical Nursing; Supervisor, 
Surgical Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Syracuse University School of Nursing, 
Syracuse, N. Y., 1930; B.S., Teachers College, Columbia University, New York, 
N. Y., 1945.) 

Elizabeth Harmon, B.A., R.N., Instructor in Medical and Surgical Nursing, Assistant 
Head of Medical and Surgical Nursing Service. (B.A., College of Wooster, Wooster, 
Ohio, 1928; Diploma in Nursing, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, Chicago, 
111., 1931.) 

Thirza Hills, B.S., R.N., Instructor in Medical and Surgical Nursing; Supervisor, Medical 
and Surgical Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Presbyterian Hospital School of 
Nursing, Chicago, 111., 1925; B.S., Teachers College, Columbia University, New 
York, N. Y., 1942.) 

Mrs. Barbara Semple Howell, B.S., R.N., Instructor in Obstetric and Gynecological 
Nursing; Supervisor, Obstetric and Gynecological Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, 
Ohio Valley General Hospital, Wheeling, W. Va., 1935; B.S. in Nursing Education, 
University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pa., 1945.) 

*Margaret Joinville, B.S., R.N., Instructor in Psychiatric Nursing; Acting Head, Psy- 
chiatric Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Army School of Nursing, Washington, 
D. C, 1929; B.S., Teachers College, Columbia University, New York, N. Y., 1941.) 

Harriet Kemper, B.S., R.N., Instructor in Medical Nursing; Supervisor, Medical Nursing 
Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Washington University, St. Louis, Mo., 1942; B.S., 
Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio, 1946.) 

Esther Edith Lipton, B.S., R.N., Instructor in Obstetric Nursing; Supervisor of Delivery 
Room Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Mt. Sinai Hospital School of Nursing, 
New York, N. Y., 1931; B.S., Public Health Nursing, Teachers College, Columbia 
University, New York, N. Y., 1931; Certified Nurse Midwife, Lobenstine School of 
Midwifery, New York, N. Y., 1941.) 

H. Rosalind MacLean, M.A., R.N., Instructor in Nursing Arts. (B.A., Adelphi 
College, Garden City, L. I., N. Y., 1932; M.A., Columbia University, New York, 
N. Y., 1933; Diploma in Nursing, The New York Hospital School of Nursing, New 
York, N. Y., 1937.) 

Edith Nielsen, B.S., R.N., Instructor in Nursing; Supervisor, Private Patient Nursing 
Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, Chicago, 
111., 1931; B.S., Teachers College, Columbia University, New York, N. Y., 1947.) 

M. Eva Poor, A.B., R.N., Head, Private Patient Nursing Service. (A.B., Tufts College, 
Medford, Mass., 1930; Diploma in Nursing, The New York Hospital School of Nurs- 
ing, New York, N. Y., 1939.) 



*Appointment effective October 1, 1947. 

32- 



Jean I. Rebentisch, M.A., R.N., Instructor in Pediatric Nursing; Supervisor, Pediatric 
Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Methodist Hospital School of Nursing, 
Brooklyn, N. Y., 1929; B.S. Teachers College, Columbia University, New York, 
N. Y., 1940; M.A., ibid., 1944.) 

Elvin H. Santos, B.S., R.N., Instructor in Psychiatric Nursing; Supervisor, Psychiatric 
Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Duke University School of Nursing, Durham, 
N. C, 1943; B.S., Catholic University of America, Washington, D. C, 1945-) 

Mary H. Swanwick, B.S., R.N., Instructor in Surgical Nursing; Supervisor, Surgical 
Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, St. Vincent's Hospital School of Nursing, 
New York, N. Y., 1941; B.S., St. John's University, Brooklyn, N. Y., 1945.) 

Jeannette Walters, B.S., R.N., Instructor in Obstetric and Gynecological Nursing; 
Assistant Department Head, Obstetric and Gynecological Nursing Service. (Diploma in 
Nursing, Temple University Hospital School of Nursing, Philadelphia, Pa., 1923; 
B.S., New York University, New York, N. Y., 1944.) 

Ruth Woodfall, B.S., R.N., Instructor in Pediatric Nursing; Supervisor, Pediatric 
Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Children's Hospital School of Nursing, Boston, 
Mass., 1932; B.S., Teachers College, Columbia University, New York, N. Y., 1947.) 

ASSISTANTS 
Rita Malloch Genner, R.N., Assistant in Nursing; Supervisor, Nurses' Health Service. 
(Diploma in Nursing, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, New York, N. Y., 
1920.) 

Inez Gnau, R.N., Assistant in Psychiatric Nursing; Supervisor, Psychiatric Nursing 
Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Jefferson Hospital School of Nursing, Philadelphia, 
Pa., 1935.) 

Lucy MacDonald Hickey, R.N., Assistant in Surgical Nursing; Assistant Supervisor, 
General Operating Room. (Diploma in Nursing, The New York Hospital School of 
Nursing, New York, N. Y., 1927.) 

*Betty Hunter, B.S., R.N., Assistant in Nursing Arts. (Diploma in Nursing, Cornell 
University-New York Hospital School of Nursing, New York, N. Y., 1946; B.S. in 
Nursing, ibid., 1946.) 

Doris Jean Iba, B.S., Assistant in Sciences. (B.S., University of Missouri, Columbia, 
Mo., 1944.) 

Dorothy E. Jump, B.S., R.N., Assistant in Obstetric and Gynecological Nursing; Night 
Supervisor, Obstetric and Gynecological Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Henry 
Ford Hospital, Detroit, Mich., 1942; B.S., Wayne University, Detroit, Mich., 1943.) 

Helen V. Miller, R.N., Assistant in Nursing; Acting Head, Private Patient Nursing 
Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Long Island College Hospital School of Nursing, 
Brooklyn, N. Y., 1932.) 

Mary McNeer, R.N., Assistant in Medical and Surgical Nursing; Supervisor, Medical 
and Surgical Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Jewish Hospital School of Nursing, 
Philadelphia, Pa., 1936.) 



*Appointment effective September 1, 1947. 

33 



Helen Ratushny, B.S., R.N., Assistant in Psychiatric Nursing; Supervisor, Psychiatric 
Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Cornell University-New York Hospital School 
of Nursing, New York, N. Y., 1944; B.S. in Nursing, ibid., 1944.) 

Pearl Lilith Robson, R.N., Assistant in Obstetric and Gynecological Nursing; Supervisor, 
Obstetric and Gynecologic Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Presbyterian Hospital 
School of Nursing, Philadelphia, Pa., 1934.) 

Mary L. Sillcox, R.N., Assistant in Obstetric and Gynecological Nursing; Supervisor, 
Obstetric and Gynecological Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Faxton Hospital 
School of Nursing, Utica, N. Y., 1916.) 

Mildred M. Steigerwalt, B.S., R.N., Assistant in Pediatric Nursing; Supervisor, 
Pediatric Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Cornell University-New York Hos- 
pital School of Nursing, New York, N. Y., 1944; B.S. in Nursing, ibid., 1944.) 

Ruth Vandenberg Thomas, B.S., R.N., Assistant in Obstetric and Gynecological Nursing; 
Supervisor, Obstetric and Gynecological Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Blodgett 
Memorial Hospital School of Nursing, Grand Rapids, Mich., 1939; B.S., Teachers 
College, Columbia University, New York, N. Y., 1944.) 

Mary Whitaker, R.N., Assistant in Psychiatric Nursing; Night Supervisor, Psychiatric 
Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, McLean Hospital School of Nursing, Waverley, 
Mass., 1933.) 

FROM THE FACULTY OF 
CORNELL UNIVERSITY MEDICAL COLLEGE 

Joseph C. Hinsey, Ph.D Dean and Professor of Anatomy 

David P. Barr, M.D Professor of Medicine 

McKeen Cattell, M.D Professor of Pharmacology 

Oskar Diethelm, M.D Professor of Psychiatry 

Edwin J. Doty, M.D Assistant Professor of Psychiatry 

Eugene F.. DuBois, M.D Professor of Physiology 

Vincent DuVigneaud, Ph.D Professor of Biochemistry 

Warner S. Hammond, Ph.D Assistant Professor of Anatomy 

Edward J. Hehre, M.D Assistant Professor of Bacteriology and Immunology 

Frank Glenn, M.D Professor of Surgery 

Samuel Z. Levine, M.D Professor of Pediatrics 

John McLeod, Ph.D Instructor in Physiology 

James M. Neill, Ph.D Professor of Bacteriology and Immunology 

Wilson G. Smillie, M.D Professor of Public Health and Preventive Medicine 

Henricus J. Stander, M.D Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology 

Ralph G. Stillman, M.D Assistant Professor of Medicine 

William H. Summerson, Ph.D Assistant Professor of Biochemistry 

Johanna Lee, B. A Assistant in Biochemistry 



ASSOCIATED WITH THE FACULTY 

LECTURER 

W. R. Redden, M.D Emergency Nursing 

American Red Cross, New York Chapter 

34 



HEALTH SERVICE 

Frances Lansdown, M.D Phy sician-in-Chief 

Edwin J. Doty, M.D Consulting Psychiatrist 



NUTRITION DEPARTMENT 

Louise Stephenson, B.S., M.S., Director 
Meredith Jones, B.S. Virginia Pearson, B.S. 

Catherine Kellerman, B.S. Elizabeth Richmond, B.S. 
Susan Paige, B.S. Jeanne Tillotson, B.S. 

(Two to be appointed) 

PAYNE WHITNEY CLINIC 

Mildred Spargo Director, Occupational Therapy Department 

Grace Brindle Director, Physical Therapy Department 

SOCIAL SERVICE DEPARTMENTS 

Theodate H. Soule, M. A Director, Main Hospital 

Mrs. Virginia T. Kinzel Director, Woman s Clinic 

Mrs. Melly Simon Director, Payne Whitney Clinic 

VISITING NURSE SERVICE OF NEW YORK 
Marion Randall, B.S., R.N Director 



COMMUNITY SERVICE SOCIETY 
Alta E. Dines, M.A., L.H.D., R.N Director, Department of Educational Nursing 

THE NEW YORK HOSPITAL 

William Harding Jackson President, Board of Governors 

Murray Sargent Director 

NURSING SERVICE ADMINISTRATION 

Virginia M. Dunbar Dean of the School of Nursing, Director of the Nursing Service 

Bessie A. R. Parker Associate Dean of the School of Nursing, 

Associate Director of the Nursing Service 

Elizabeth Moser Assistant Director of the Nursing Service 

Charlotte S. Argabrite Night Administrative Assistant 

Sarah E. Moore Day Administrative Assistant 

Clara Brown Day Administrative Assistant 

Vanda Summers Evening Administrative Assistant 

(See Faculty for Heads of Clinical Nursing Services) 
35 



NURSING SERVICE COMMITTEE 



Bessie A. R. Parker, Chairman 
Virginia M. Dunbar 
Verda F. Hickcox 
Charlotte S. Argabrite 
Mary S. Klein 
H. Rosalind MacLean 
Sarah E. Moore 



Elizabeth Moser 
Olive M. Reid 
Agnes Schubert 
Vanda Summers 
Edna L. Fritz 
Helen Y. Miller 
Muriel Carbery 



SUPERVISORS 

Vera Beech Day Supervisor, Private Patient Service 

Inez Mullin Evening Supervisor, Private Patient Service 

*Mary C. Brennan Night Supervisor, Private Patient Service 



♦Appointment effective September 15, 1947. 



<5%g) 



36 



HEAD NURSES 



Christine Biltz 
Ruth Brockman 
Mary Capuano 
Doris Clauser 
Helen Cottrell 
Barbara Cullington 
Barbara Derr 
Margaret DeWitt 
Doris Dieterle 
Pamela Dotter 



MEDICINE AND SURGERY 

Margaret Ewen 
Rosemary Farmer 
Gladys Jones 
Elizabeth McKeown 
Alice Monroe 
Jeanne Nelson 
Doris Place 
Agnes Rafferty 
Rosalie Sturz Rau 
Alverna Skoog 



Stella Smariga 
Edna Stratton 
Salome Yauniskas 
Katherine Zorn 
Nina Lubowska 
Katherine Bloom 
Ethel Kimball 
Alberta Ward 



OBSTETRICS AND GYNECOLOGY 



Alma Bott 
Elizabeth Calder 
Anna Colwell 
Agnes Conner 
Clara Hawtin 
Opal Keith 



Violet Knox 
Thelma Mathews 
Veronica Matus 
Celerina Miguel 
Dorothy Philla 
Margaret Skinner 



dorene sturdevant 
Regina Weiss 
Lucille White 
Kathleen Young 



Gertrude Goodman 
loretta kerwin 
Marjorie Leonard 
Grace Lundgren 



PAYNE WHITNEY CLINIC (Psychiatry) 

Edwin McBride Dorothy Ranson 

Beatrice McKee E. Jane Smith 

Esther Morrison Jessie Weaver 

Marjorie Nelson Arline Wilson 



Evelyn Clark 
Elizabeth Geiger 
Evelyn Golden 
Martha Hutchins 
Lucille Lambert 



OUT-PATIENT DEPARTMENT 

Evelyn Liddle 
Ilene Long 
Della Meachard 
Eleanor Mills 
Elsa Nussbaumer 



Florence Orlopp 
Elise Riggs 
Margaret Rouchleau 
Paulette San Marchi 



Lois Cantrell 
Jane Kintner 
Ruth Learn 



PRIVATE PATIENTS 

Claire Meyerowitz 

Ane Nielsen 
Ruth Nielsen 



Elizabeth Rasely 
Genevieve Swatski 
Blanche Todd 



Alice DonDero 



PEDIATRICS 
Jane Wynn 
Kathleen Nestor 



Eileen Kiernan 



37 



STUDENTS NOW IN THE SCHOOL* 



Class 

Aldor, Shirley '48 

Ansalone, Carla '48 

Bahnmuller, Ethel '47 

Banome, Anna Marie '48 

Bantley, Charlotte E '48 

Beldin, Eloise '47 

Bennett, Barbara '48 

Bernstein, Roslyn '47 

Bielski, Mary Theresa '49 

BlRNBAUM, BERNICE '48 

Blodgett, Betty C '48 

Bohman, Helen Page '48 

Bouton, Anne '47 

Boyd, Lois Mae '48 

Brown, Shirley Irene '49 

Bucher, Margaret L '48 

Bundy, Shirley '47 

Byrnes, Margaret '48 

Cain, Mary '47 

Chipley, Agatha '47 

Clark, Mary Inez '48 

Clifford, Jane C '48 

Cox, Helen D '48 

Craig, Elizabeth '47 

Cumming, Helen '47 

Dauphin, Arlene Kathryn '49 

Degen, Lilli Eva '48 

Detwiler, Barbara Ann '48 

Dirks, Marguerite Joan '48 

Dontzow, Jeannette '47 

Dunham, Jean Anne '48 

Earle, Ellen '47 

Eckerson, Dawn '47 

Eells, Helen '47 

Ehlers, Gloria '47 

Epps, Marjorie Wadsworth '49 

Erb, Gloria '47 

Fahys, Kathryn Jackson '48 

Felsenfeld, Elaine '48 

Folley, Cynthia '47 

Ford, Anna Estelle '47 

Foster, Joanne '47 

Fox, Julie Miller '48 

Fraser, June '47 

French, Jean Gilvey '49 



Home 
New York, N. Y. 
New York, N. Y. 
Medford, L. I. 
Forest Hills, N. Y. 
Johnstown, Pa. 
West Chester, Pa. 



Hohokus, N. J. 
New York, N. Y. 
Philadelphia, Pa. 
New York, N. Y. 
St. Albans, N. Y. 
West Hartford, Conn. 
Tenafly, N.J. 
Philadelphia, Pa. 
Scranton, Pa. 
Leonia, N.J. 
Ridgewood, N. J. 
West Orange, N. J. 
Elmira, N. Y. 
Raleigh, N. C. 
Utica, N. Y. 
Norwich, Conn. 
New York, N. Y. 
Haddam, Conn. 
Plainfield, N. J. 
Savannah, 111. 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Red Lion, Pa. 
Montague, Mass. 
New York, N. Y. 
Homosassa Springs, Fla. 
Worcester, Mass. 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Savona, N. Y. 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Chapel Hill, N. C. 
Jamaica, N. Y. 
Sea Cliff, N. Y. 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Larchmont, N. Y. 
Rutherford, N. J. 
St. Lambert, P. Q., Can. 
Rochester, N. Y. 
Hamden, Conn. 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 



College or University 
Upsala College and Hunter College 



Gettysburg College 
University of Washington and 

Temple University- 
Hunter College 
Temple University 
Brooklyn College 
Park College 
Marietta College 
Oberlin College 
Temple University 
Temple University 
New Jersey College for Women 
Bucknell University 

Elmira College 

St. Mary's Junior College 

Univ. of Connecticut (B.A., '41) 

Hunter College 

Colby Junior College 

New Jersey College for Women 

Frances Shimer Junior College 

Temple University 

Blackburn College 

Hunter College 

Agnes Scott College 

Smith College 

Packer Collegiate Institute 

Geneseo State Teachers College 

Brooklyn College 

University of North Carolina 

Ohio State University 

Pratt Institute 

Cornell University 

College of New Rochelle 
McGill University 
Colby Junior College 

Brooklyn College 



■ 



including those graduating in September, 1947 but not including those entering at that time. 

38 




A student weighs a small patient in the Well-Baby Clinic of the Department of Pediatrics. 




The informal Florence Nightingale Lounge in the Nurses' Residence. 










Students practice ward techniques in the Nursing Arts Laboratory. 



Name Class 

Frye, Betty '47 

Fulton, Adele Louise '48 

Gebhart, Mary J '48 

Gblinas, Maxine Olive '48 

Ghormley, Josephine '48 

Gordon, Doris Joye '48 

Gotwald, Mary '47 

Guidal, Patricia '48 

Hagan, Majanah Lenora '48 

Hallas, Helen '47 

Hallman, Alma Ethel '48 

Hardiman, Mary '47 

Harding, Claire '47 

Hardy, Gertrude '49 

Harper, Dorothy Eleanor '48 

Hastings, Ann Bernice '49 

Hazeltine, Louise S '49 



Hiscox, Kathryn 

Hisgen, Jessie G 

Holland, Lois W 

Horton, Jane 

Hummel, Barbara 

James, Gladys 

Jennings, Joan 

Johnson, Patricia 

Jones, Dorothy Zimmerman 

Jordan, Patricia Jean 

Jurusik, Josephine M 

Kindig, Marion Kobbes .... 

Knuth, Virginia Mary 

Kokos, Anastassia 

Koliopulos, Elizabeth 

Langdale, Patricia 

Larson, Edna 

Lehrbach, Mary Therese. . . 

Leitstein, Jessie 

Lesh, Elizabeth May 

Little, Catherine 

Lloyd, Louisa Barton 






Lucas, Barbara 

MacKellar, Jean F 

McCue, Rosalie 

McVittie, Jean Elizabeth . 

Margolis, Beatrice 

Mehan, Eunice , 

Merkley, Patricia 

Metzger, Dorothy 



'47 
'47 
'48 
"47 
*48 
'47 
'48 
'48 
"47 
'49 
'48 
'48 
'49 
'48 
'48 
'47 
'47 
'49 
*47 
'49 
'48 
'48 

'47 
'49 
"47 
'48 
'47 
'47 
'47 
"47 



Home 
Sharon, Mass. 
Ramsey, N. J. 
Westboro, Mass. 

Baltimore, Md. 
Baltimore, Md. 
Forest Hills, N. Y. 
Gettysburg, Pa. 
Flushing, N. Y. 
Roanoke, Va. 
Port Chester, N. Y. 
Hialeah, Fla. 
Plainfield, N.J. 
Wilkes-Barre, Pa. 
Upper Darby, Pa. 
Jamaica, N. Y. 
Leonia, N.J. 
Trucksville, Pa. 

Wilkes-Barre, Pa. 
Pasadena, Calif. 
Jamaica, N. Y. 
Leonia, N.J. 
Waterbury, Conn. 
Glen Rock, N.J. 
Pelham, N. Y. 
Great Neck, N. Y. 
St. Petersburg, Fla. 
Fanwood, N.J. 
Elmira Heights, N. Y. 
Hunlock Creek, Pa. 
Elmira, N. Y. 
Woodbury, N.J. 
Hagerstown, Md. 
Lewisburg, Pa. 
Folcroft, Pa. 
Rochester, N. Y. 
New York, N. Y. 
Wind Gap, Pa. 
East Braintree, Mass. 
Roxbury, Va. 

West Newton, Mass. 
River Edge, N.J. 
Stamford, Conn. 
Canandaigua, N. Y. 
Bogota, N.J. 
Stamford, Conn. 
Middletown, Conn. 
Ramsey, N.J. 

39 



College or University 
Boston University 
Furman University 
Massachusetts State Teachers Col- 
lege (B.S., '42) 
University of Maryland 
Bucknell University 
Elmira College 
Gettysburg College 

Mars Hill Junior College 
Averett College 
University of Miami 
Wheaton College 
Bucknell University 
New Jersey College for Women 
Adelphi College (B.A., '43) 
New Jersey College for Women 
Bucknell Junior College and 

Bucknell University (B.A., '46) 
Bucknell University 
Antioch College 
Adelphi College 

Cornell University 
Madison College 

Smith College 

Cornell University 

Cornell University 

Elmira College 

Temple University 

Elmira College 

New Jersey College for Women 

College of New Rochelle 

Temple University 

Temple University 

Cornell University 

Hunter College 

Temple University 

Boston University 

Sweet Briar College and 

William and Mary College 
Boston University 
Cornell University 

Cornell University 
New York University 
University of Connecticut 
Elmira College 
Furman University 



Name Class 

Mixell, Tamea '47 

Monastra, Rosemary '47 

Morrison, Marjorie Ann '48 

Murray, Irene Elizabeth '49 

Nagorka, Halina '47 

Nelson, Jean '47 

Nixon, Pamela '49 

O'Hara, Marion '48 

Oren, Adele Toby '48 

Packer, Phyllis '49 

Palmer, Frances Williams '48 

Partington, Gladys F '48 

Pederson, Evelyn Marie '48 

Peterson, Constance L '48 

Peterson, Jane '49 

Poppleton, Barbara '48 

Poutray, Anne Higgins '47 

Prom ann, Ursula Marianne. ... '49 

Quedens, Margaret Helen '48 

Reimer, Margaret Ann '48 

Rice, Dorothy Alice '47 

Riker, Jean Waln '49 

Rogers, Anne Bradley '49 

Rogers, Elva L '47 

Rosen, Helen Betty '48 

Russo, Marie Antoinette '49 

Rynne, Eileen Regina '48 

Saba, Louise Martha • '48 

Sasso, Anna Elizabeth '48 

Saul, Harriet Gertrude '49 

Scanlon, Jeanne Marie '48 

Scott, Charlotte '47 

Schmidt, Joan Wanda '49 

Sevison, Martha '47 

Sheret, Jennie Barbara '48 

Shlimbaum, Prudence A '49 

Shore, Ann Teadwell '49 

Sieminski, Irene Marie '48 

Silver, Cecily '49 

Simpson, Clare '48 

Simpson, Gloria Ruth '49 

Smith, Dorothy '47 

Snell, Mary Harriet '48 

Springer, Eugenie '47 

Stafford, Mary '47 

Stang, Dorothy '47 

Stenvall, Audrey '49 

Sterba, Helen Anna '48 



Home 
Harrisburg, Pa. 
Hammonton, N. J. 
Honesdale, Pa. 
Norristown, Pa. 
Elyria, Ohio 
Boston, Mass. 
Short Hills, N.J. 
New York, N. Y. 
Catskill, N. Y. 

Interlaken, N. Y. 
Hilton, N. Y. 
New York, N. Y. 
Modesto, Calif. 
New York, N. Y. 
Wethersfield, Conn. 
Elmira, N. Y. 
Edgewood, R. I. 
Weehauken, N. J. 
New York, N. Y. 
Mamaroneck, N. Y. 
Bronx, N. Y. 
South Orange, N. J. 
Cleveland, Ohio 
Kingston, Pa. 
Hazleton, Pa. 
Flushing, N. Y. 
New York, N. Y. 
Wilkes-Barre, Pa. 
Maiden, Mass. 
New Hyde Park, N. Y 
New York, N. Y. 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Astoria, N. Y. 
Princeton, Ky. 
Ogdensburg, N. Y. 
Bay Shore, N. Y. 
Hempstead, N. Y. 
Kingston, Pa. 
Middle Village, N. Y. 
New York, N. Y. 
Ambler, Pa. 
Ridge wood, N.J. 
Herkimer, N. Y. 
Carthage, Mo. 

Urbana, 111. 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Patchogue, Pa. 
New York, N. Y. 



College or University 
Western College 
New Jersey College for Women 
University of Connecticut 
Cornell University 
Kent State University 
Oberlin College 
Briarcliff Junior College 
College of Mount St. Vincent 
Cornell University and 
University of Miami 
Cornell University 
Cornell University 

Modesto Junior College 
Hunter College 
Wheaton College 
Elmira College 

Concordia Collegiate Institute 
Barnard College 



Colby Junior College 
Briarcliff Junior College 
Bucknell University 
University of Pennsylvania 
St. Mary of the Springs 
Hunter College (B.A., *44) 
Bucknell Junior College 
Boston University 
Concordia Collegiate Institute 
College of Mt. St. Vincent 
Brooklyn College 
Hunter College 
Vanderbilt University 
Tusculum College 
Elmira College 
Hood College 
Bucknell Junior College 
Queens College 
Packer Collegiate Institute 
Pennsylvania State College 
New Jersey College for Women 
Cornell University 
Joplin Junior College and 
University of Chicago 
University of Illinois 
Lasell Junior College 
Concordia Collegiate Institute 
New York University 



40 



Name Class 

Stiglitz, Patricia Mary '48 

Stockton, Annh E '48 

Strauss, Beatrice '47 

Strickland, Marie '47 

Strings, Mary Ann '48 

Swanson, Ellen '47 

Talbot, Mary '47 

Tate, Lucille '47 

Teufel, Audrey May '48 

Thompson, Arlene Joyce '48 

Thompson, Janice '47 

Treiber, Helen '47 

Trudeau, Martha May '48 

Tucciarone, Rosina '48 

Van Arsdale, Martha L '49 

Van Zandt, Elizabeth '48 

von Thurn, Louise '48 

Wallace, Grace Annette '48 

Watson, Beatrice Mary '48 

Wheeler, Barbara '47 

Wiedman, Janet Elizabeth '49 

Wigsten, Mary '47 

Zasinas, Virginia A '48 

Ziegler, Lillian Louise '48 



Home 
Plainfield, N.J. 
Ridgewood, N. J. 
Bronx, N. Y. 
New York, N. Y. 
Nashville, Tenn. 

Elmhurst, L. I. 
Salt Lake City, Utah 
Westfield, N.J. 
Milton, Pa. 
Rochester, N. Y. 
Elmhurst, L. I. 
Frenchtown, N. J. 
Middlebury, Vt. . 
New York, N. Y. 
East Orange, N. J. 
Blawenburg, N. J. 
Belmont, Mass. 
Jersey City, N. J. 
Homer, N. Y. 
West Englewood, N. J. 
Kenmore, N. Y. 

Elmira, N. Y. 
Easton, Pa. 
Lynbrook, N. Y. 



College or University 
Madison College 
Mt. Holyoke College 
Hunter College 
Hunter College 
George Peabody College for 
Teachers 

Westminster Junior College 
Bucknell University 

Cornell University 

Hunter College 

New Jersey College for Women 

Hunter College (B.A., *39) 
Hood College 

New Jersey College for Women 
Middlebury College 

Cornell University 

New Jersey College for Women 

University of Colorado and 

University of Buffalo 
Elmira College 
Moravian College for Women 
Syracuse University (B.F.A., '40) 



4i 



FORM OF BEQUEST 

Gifts or bequests to the School of Nursing may be made 
either to the University or the Hospital with a request 
that they be used for the School of Nursing, as follows: 

"I give and bequeath to Cornell University (or, 
' 'I give and bequeath to The Society of the New 

York Hospital") the sum of $ 

for use in connection with the Cornell Uni- 
versity-New York Hospital School of Nursing. 

If it is desired that a gift shall be used in whole or in part 
for any specific purpose in the program of the School of 
Nursing such use may be specified. 



(s^g) 



INDEX 



Absences, 15 

Accreditation of the school, 12 

Activities, 16; Nurses' Residence, 16; Alumnae 

Association, 17; recreation, 16; school 

government, 17 
Administrative and teaching personnel, 28-36 
Admission, requirements for, 9; application 

for, 10; credit requirements, 10; educational 

requisites, 9 
Advanced standing, 12 
Aim of School of Nursing, 5 
Alumnae Association, 17; Irene Sutliffe 

Fund, 15 
American Red Cross, 34 
Anatomy, 19, 21 
Application for admission, 10 
Assistant professors, 31 
Assistants in instruction, 33, 34 
Associate professors, 30 
Associated with faculty, 34, 35 

Bequest, form of, 42 

Biological and physical sciences, 21 



Educational requisites, 9 
Emergency nursing, 20, 23 
Emeritus professors, 30 

Facilities for instruction, 7-9 
Faculty, 30-34; associated with, 34, 35 
Fees and expenses, 13; method of 

ment, 13, 14 
Financial aid, 14 



pay- 



Graduation, 11, 12; advanced standing, 12; 
degree and diploma, 12 

Head nurses, 37 

Health service, 15; personnel, 35 

History, 6, 7 

History of Nursing, 19, 22 

Instructors, 31, 32, 33 

Jackson, William Harding, president, Board 

of Governors, 28, 35 
Joint Administrative Board, 28 



Calendar, 3 

Career opportunities in nursing, 4 

Chemistry, 19, 21 

Clinical Pathology, 19, 21 

Clinics, 8 

Communicable diseases, 19, 24 

Community Service Society, 35 

Contents, 2 

Cornell University, founded, 6, 7; degree, 12; 

Medical College faculty, 34 
Courses, description of, 21-27 
Credit requirements, 10 
Curriculum, 17, 18; first year, 19; second 

year, 20; third year, 20 

Day, Edmund Ezra, president, Cornell Uni- 
versity, 28, 30 

Degree, 12 

Description of courses, 21-27 

Development of Behavior in Children, 20, 26 

Diet therapy, 19, 20, 24 

Diploma, 12 

Dunbar, Virginia M., dean, School of Nurs- 
ing, 28, 29; director, Nursing Service, 35 



Libraries, 7, 8 
Loan funds, 14 

Maintenance, 14 
Medical Nursing, 19, 20, 24 
Medicine, 19, 24 
Microbiology, 19, 21 

New York Hospital, 6, 7; officers, 35; Nursing 
Service Administration, 35; Nursing Service 
Committee, 36; supervisors, 36; head 
nurses, 37 

Nurses' Residence, 7, 8, 15, 16 

Nursing and allied arts, general, 23 

Nursing Arts I, 19, 23 

Nursing Arts II, 19, 23 

Nursing Service Administration, 35 

Nursing Service Committee, 36 

Nutrition, 19, 24; department of, 35; Nutri- 
tion and Cookery, 24 

Obstetric and Gynecological Nursing, 20, 25; 

obstetrics and gynecology, 20, 25 
Operative technique, 20, 25 



43 



Orientation, 19, 23 

Out-Patient Departments, 8, 9, 17, 18 

Payne Whitney Clinic, 8, 35 
Pediatric Nursing, 20, 26 
Pediatrics, 20, 26 
Pharmacology I, 19, 23 
Pharmacology II, 19, 23 
Physical education, 19, 20, 22, 23 
Physiology, 19, 21 
Private Patient Nursing, 20, 25 
Professional Adjustments I, 19, 22 
Professional Adjustments II, 20, 22 
Professors, 30 

Promotion and graduation, 11, 12; see Ad- 
vanced standing, Degree, Diploma 
Psychiatric Nursing, 20, 26, 27 
Psychiatry, 20, 26 

Psychology of Deviate Behavior, 19, 21 
Public health, 9, 20, 22 

Recreation, 16 



Scholarships, 14, 15 

School government, 17 

School of Nursing, administrative officers, 29; 

assistants in administration, 29; faculty 

standing committees, 29 
School of Nursing Council, 28 
Social and Economic Aspects of Health and 

Disease, 19 
Social and Health Aspects of Nursing, 22 
Social sciences, 21 
Social service departments, 35 
State registration, 12 
Students now in school, 38-41 
Supervisors, 36 
Surgery, 19, 25 
Surgical Nursing, 19, 20, 25 

Tuition, 13 

Uniforms, 13 

Vacations and absences, 2, 15 

Visiting Nurse Service of New York, 35 



44 



CORNELL UNIVERSITY 



OFFICIAL PUBLICATION 



JULY 29, 1948 



Cornell University — New York Hospital 

School of Nursing 




ANNOUNCEMENT FOR 
1948-1949 SESSIONS 



Term Dates 1948-1949 

Sept. 27, 1948 -Jan. 16, 1949 

Jan. 17, 1949 -May 8, 1949 

May 9, 1949 -Oct. 2, 1949 

Oct. 3, 1949 -Jan. 22, 1950 



LOCATION OF THE SCHOOL OF NURSING 

The School of Nursing is located on the extreme east side of 
New York. It is part of the New York Hospital-Cornell Medical 
Center, which extends from 68th Street to 71st Street and from 
York Avenue to the East River. 

The Dean's office is reached most easily through the main 
entrance of the Hospital on East 68th Street (East of York Ave- 
nue). The Nurses Residence is at the corner of York Avenue and 
70th Street. 

The 65th Street Crosstown Bus M-7, east-bound, runs to the 
Medical Center. 



CORNELL UNIVERSITY OFFICIAL PUBLICATION 

Published by Cornell University at Ithaca, New York, every two 
weeks throughout the year. Volume 40, July 29, 1948, Number 3. 
Entered as second-class matter, December 14, 1916, at the post 
office at Ithaca, New York, under the act of August 24, 1912. 



CORNELL UNIVERSITY 
OFFICIAL PUBLICATION 

ITHACA, NEW YORK 

Cornell University-New York Hospital 

School of Nursing 

1948-1949 

525 EAST 68TH STREET: NEW YORK 21, N. Y. 



Contents 



Calendar 3 

Career Opportunities in Nursing 4 

Aim of the School 4 

History 5 

Facilities for Instruction 7 

Requirements for Admission and Graduation 10 

Accreditation 14 

State Registration 14 

Fees and Expenses t 15 

Scholarships 16 

Health Service 18 

Vacations and Absences 19 

Activities 19 

Curriculum 22 

Description of Courses 26 

Administration 32 

Faculty 34 

Associated with the Faculty 39 

Students in the School 43 

Form of Bequest 46 

Index 47 

(Picture Credits: Ben Greenhaus, Paul Parker) 



Calendar 



1948 

Registration of freshmen students 

Commencement 

Holiday (except for freshmen): Columbus Day 

Holiday: Thanksgiving Day 

Christmas recess for freshmen students begins 

Holiday: Christmas Day 

1949 

Holiday: New Year's Day 

Last day of Christmas recess for freshmen 

Holiday: Lincoln's Birthday 

Holiday: Washington's Birthday 

Holiday: Memorial Day 

Holiday: Independence Day 

Holiday: Labor Day 

Commencement 

Registration of freshmen students 

Holiday (except for freshmen) : Columbus Day 

Holiday: Thanksgiving Day 

Christmas recess for freshmen students begins 

Holiday: Christmas Day 

1950 

Jan. 2 Monday Holiday: New Year's Day 

Last day of Christmas recess for freshmen 
Monday Holiday: Lincoln's Birthday 
Wednesday Holiday: Washington's Birthday 
Tuesday Holiday: Memorial Day 
Tuesday Holiday: Independence Day 



Sept. 


25 


Saturday 


Sept. 


28 


Tuesday 


Oct. 


12 


Tuesday 


Nov. 


25 


Thursday 


Dec. 


24 


Friday 


Dec. 


25 


Saturday 


Jan. 


1 


Saturday 


Jan. 


2 


Sunday 


Feb. 


12 


Saturday 


Feb. 


22 


Tuesday 


May 


30 


Monday 


July 


4 


Monday 


Sept. 


5 


Monday 


Sept. 


29 


Thursday 


Oct. 


1 


Saturday 


Oct. 


12 


Wednesday 


Nov. 


24 


Thursday 


Dec. 


24 


Saturday 


Dec. 


26 


Monday 



Feb. 


13 


Feb. 


22 


Mav 


30 


July 


4 



Career Opportunities in Nursing 



Nursing is one of the vital health services of the world. There are 
now more nurses actively engaged in the practice of their profession 
than ever before, but there is also a greater-than-ever demand for them, 
because of the increasing diversity of nursing activities. This is a re- 
flection of the growing desire on the part of the public, not only for 
care during illness, but for the information and the services which will 
help them keep well. 

Career opportunities are many and varied. The scope of activity of 
the modern graduate nurse is limited only by her preparation, 
abilities, and interests. Her services may influence the welfare of a 
single patient, a community, or a nation. 

The well-educated, well-prepared young woman faces a broad chal- 
lenge. Schools, industry, local and national health agencies are seeking 
her assistance. Old hospitals are expanding and new ones are being 
built, with daily increasing patient registrations. The United States 
Public Health Service is reaching out to more and more people; Con- 
gress yearly enacts legislation making available additional health 
facilities to new groups of citizens. Visiting nurse services are multiply- 
ing. There can be no doubt that our nation is awake to the fact that 
the health of its people is one of the most important resources of its 
wealth and power. 

Nurses must have the understanding and the skill which will prepare 
them to accept the responsibilities which the needs of the nation will 
place upon them. 



The Aim of the School of Nursing 






The aim of the School of Nursing is to guide the student in her 
development as a responsible citizen; to help her secure a good grasp 
of the principles of bedside nursing, health teaching, and the use of 
community resources for the care and prevention of illness; to assist 
her in qualifying for professional practice in first-level positions in any 
branch of nursing. 



History 



This School of Nursing was one of the first to be founded in the 
United States; it is seventy-one years old. As early as 1799, Dr. Valentine 
Seaman, a scholar and prominent physician, organized a series of lec- 
tures for nurses combined with a course of practical instruction on the 
wards. Although the theoretical content was meager and the practical 
instruction not systematically planned, these classes focused attention 
on the fact that women who had some preparation for their work gave 
better care to patients than those without instruction. Each year the 
program was amplified and in 1877 a formal training school for 
nurses was established "to consist of one teacher and 24 pupils." 

GROWTH OF THE NEW YORK HOSPITAL 

The school was for many years an integral part of The New York Hos- 
pital, the second oldest hospital in America maintained by private en- 
dowment. George the Third of England granted the Hospital its 
charter of incorporation on June 13, 1771, under the title of The Society 
of the Hospital in the City of New York in America. This title was 
changed in 1810 to the present one of The Society of the New York 
Hospital. While its roots extend far into the past, the Hospital has 
consistently been sensitive and responsive to the changing needs of the 
community and to the progress of science. One evidence of this has 
been the gradual increase in the functions and size of the institution, 
which has necessitated expansion and re-location to correspond with 
the growth of the city and with the increasing scope of knowledge 
related to health. The present site and buildings are the third it has 
occupied. 

SCHOOL BECOMES PART OF CORNELL UNIVERSITY 

Just as the Hospital has grown and changed to keep pace with the 
health needs of society, so too has the program and organization of the 
School of Nursing been kept flexible and dynamic. The first course was 
eighteen months in length. After thirteen years this was increased to 
twenty-four months and in 1896 to three years. It was fitting that in 
1942, on the 65th anniversary of the founding of the school, it should 
have become a part of Cornell University, thus making available the 
resources of two great institutions, each of which has a long history 



6 SCHOOL OF NURSING 

and a notable record of achievement in the fields of education and 
public welfare. 

Cornell University received its first endowment from the Federal 
Government's Educational Land Grant in 1862. The appropriation 
under the Morrill Act was to endow a college "where the leading object 
shall be. . .to teach such branches of learning as are related to agri- 
culture and the mechanical arts." This was the beginning of a re- 
markable system of higher education. However, it received its greatest 
impetus through the vision and generosity of Ezra Cornell, who, under 
the influence of Andrew D. White, his colleague and later the first 
president, determined the form of the new University. In 1864, an 
agreement was reached with the legislature of New York State which 
resulted in the founding of "a University of a new type. . .an insti- 
tution where any person can find instruction in any study." This com- 
bination of federal, state, and private interests and resources is unique. 
It gives strength to the organization, broadens the aims and the policies 
of the University, and extends the influence of its educational ideals. 

One field of service after another has found preparation for its 
workers within this great University. In June, 1927, an association be- 
tween the Cornell University Medical College and The New York 
Hospital was completed, cementing the relationship between the two a 
and resulting in 1932 in their joint occupancy of the newly-constructed 
buildings of The New York Hospital-Cornell Medical Center on the 
East River between 68th and 71st Streets. Preparation for nursing was t i 
first brought under the auspices of the University in July, 1942, when, 
by agreement between the Trustees of the University and the Gover- 
nors of The New York Hospital, the School of Nursing, long con- 
ducted by The Society of the New York Hospital, was made an autono- 
mous school in the University. 



i:. 



It: 



Facilities for Instruction 

Unusual facilities for learning are available to students in the 
nursing school. These include class rooms, libraries, laboratories, and 
instructors' offices. Some of these are in the teaching unit on the second 
floor of the Nurses' residence, while others are provided in the hospital 
and the Cornell University Medical College. 

The students' observation and practice include activities in the 
clinical departments of the hospital and in the various community 
agencies of the city. 

LARGE LIBRARIES AVAILABLE 

The library of the school contains a wide selection of periodicals on 
nursing and related fields, including complete sets of important medical 
and nursing periodicals in bound volumes. It is under the direction of 
a committee of the faculty. The facilities of the library of the medical 
college are readily accessible and supplement those of the nursing 
school in such a way as to make available unusual resources to both 
the students and faculty of the school. A librarian is in constant at- 
tendance in both libraries. The open-shelf system prevails throughout, 
thereby permitting free access to all books. Additional small libraries 
are adjacent to the nursing conference rooms on the Hospital floors in 
all departments. Through the New York Public Library, valuable sup- 
plementary sociological materials are placed at the disposal of in- 
structors and students as needed. 



WIDE EXPERIENCE GAINED IN CLINICS 

The clinical facilities of The New York Hospital are unsurpassed 
for the care and study of patients. The Hospital was planned to be 
composed of five University clinics, largely self-contained. Each of these 
is provided not only with facilities adequate in every way for medical 
practice both for in-patients and out-patients, but also with facilities 
for teaching and for the conduct of research. An unusual number of 
specialized clinical services are therefore available which are seldom 
found within a single organization. The Hospital has a capacity of 
over one thousand beds and during the past year 26,128 patients were 
admitted. The conduct of research in all clinical departments gives the 
student nurse an opportunity to become increasingly aware of the 



8 SCHOOL OF NURSING 

part which the nurse must be prepared to play in research projects. 
Authenticity of the findings in such studies depends in no small degree 
on the accuracy with which the nurse carries out tests and procedures, 
observes and records reactions. 

The Medical and Surgical Departments include, in addition to 
general medicine and surgery, pavilions devoted to the specialties of 
urology, communicable disease (including tuberculosis), eye, ear, nose, 
and throat disorders, medical neurology, emergencies, and metabolism. 
The Woman's Clinic has a capacity of 190 adults and 121 newborns 
and provides for obstetric and gynecological patients. During the past 
year 4,870 deliveries took place in this clinic. 

The Department of Pediatrics includes 90 beds with separate floors 
for the care of infants, children, and premature babies. Facilities for 
the recreation of convalescent children offer opportunities for the 
student of nursing to study the development and guidance of con- 
valescent as well as sick children. There is a nursery school within this 
Department. Here the student works with and observes the develop- 
ment of the normal child, and is thus better able to evaluate deviations 
from the normal which may accompany illness. 

The Payne Whitney Clinic for psychiatric care has a bed capacity 
of 110 patients and offers participation in hydrotherapy, occupational 
and recreational therapy as part of the experience in the care of the 
mentally ill. The close connection between the psychiatric medical 
staff and the medical staffs of the other clinical departments, on a con- 
sultation basis, gives the student an opportunity to study the mental 
manifestations of illness throughout her experience in the Hospital. 

OUT-PATIENT SERVICES 

The Out-Patient Department of the Hospital provides excellent 
opportunity for the study of ambulatory patients on all services. Last 
year there were 296,755 visits to this Department, an average of 1009 
patients each clinic day. The Out-Patient Department gives oppor- 
tunity for participation in the consultation service for expectant 
mothers, mothers' classes, family studies, nutrition conferences, special 
aspects of the treatment and follow-up on venereal diseases and many 
other activities related to the care of ambulatory patients. 

PUBLIC HEALTH AFFILIATIONS 

Cooperation with the Visiting Nurse Service of New York, the De- 
partment of Educational Nursing of the Community Service Society 
of New York and other community agencies, affords experience in the 
nursing care and health teaching of patients in their homes. The Kips 
Bay-Yorkville Health Center, the Lenox Hill Neighborhood House, 






• 




* 





The Hobby Shop in the Nurses' Residence encourages spare-time activities. 




Students attend class in psychiatry. 



FACILITIES FOR INSTRUCTION 9 

and the Guggenheim Dental Clinic, all located within two blocks of 
the Hospital, offer convenient opportunity for student observations 
of community health programs. 

The Social Service Department of The New York Hospital partici- 
pates in the nursing course through the integration of social service in 
the program of study. 



Requirements for 
Admission and Graduation 

REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION 

All students enter the School of Nursing on the recommendation I 
of the faculty Committee on Admissions which reviews all applications. 
Since nursing requires women of integrity, of high intelligence, and 
with a deep interest in public service, those candidates are selected 
whose credentials indicate high rank in scholarship, personal fitness 
for nursing, maturity, and good general health. 

AGE AND HEALTH REQUIREMENTS 

As each applicant is considered in the light of her total qualifications, 
there are no definite age limits. In general, however, it is expected that 
applicants will fall within the range of 18 to 35 years. The results of 
a complete physical examination as well as those of a dental examina- 
tion must be submitted at the time of application. Inoculation against 
typhoid fever and vaccination against smallpox will be required of all 
students before admission to the school. 

EDUCATIONAL REQUISITES 

The minimum educational requisites for admission are satisfactory 
completion of at least two years of college (60 semester hours exclusive 
of physical education). The applicant may have taken her college work 
at Cornell University, Ithaca, New York, or at any university or senior 
or junior college accredited by the Association of American Universities 
or by one of the regional associations of colleges and secondary schools. 

It is not necessary for the work of these two years to be part of a 
designated "Nursing" or "Pre-Nursing" course. Excellent preparation 
is possible through other programs of study, such as Liberal Arts or 
Home Economics. 

Because the work of the nurse requires that she have an understand- 
ing of human reactions and of social factors influencing community 
development, that she be able to express herself well and participate in 
community planning for nursing services, it is important that she 
obtain a sound background in history, psychology, and other social 

10 



Insert in School of Nursing 
Announcement for 1943-49. 



CREDIT REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION 

(see Page 11) 

Applicants who do not meet in full the specific 
subject requirements for admission, but who have 
otherwise a good record of two or more years of 
college are encouraged to communicate with the 
Dean, School of Nursing, for consideration as to 
whether alternate credits can be accepted. 

Assistance in arranging plans for taking 
required subjects in summer session can also be 
obtained by communicating with this office. 



11/48 



REQUIREMENTS I OR ADMISSION AND GRADUATION II 

sciences, as well as in literature, English, and foreign languages. With 
the exception of psychology, indicated below, specific requirements in 
these subjects are not laid down because a variety of satisfactory com- 
binations can be accepted. A sound two-year liberal arts program serves 
as the best foundation on which to build all professional advancement. 

Physical sciences are important in the preparation for admission, 
but should not be taken at the expense of the subjects referred to above. 
Obviously, the young woman who can devote more than two years to 
her liberal arts preparation has more leeway to include several science 
courses in her college work as well as further general academic courses. 
Unquestionably this would be desirable in preparation for many po- 
sitions in the field of nursing. 

In addition to the academic and health requirements, consideration 
will be given to the applicant's personal fitness for nursing. 

CREDIT REQUIREMENTS 

All applicants are required to have completed college courses in the 
following physical and social sciences before admission to the School 
of Nursing: 

Chemistry (including laboratory) 6 credit hours 

Biological science (including laboratory) 6 credit hours 

Psychology 3 credit hours 

Beginning with the class entering the School of Nursing in September 
1950, the following policy will become effective: 

1. Human Anatomy, Physiology, and Bacteriology will not be 
accepted as fulfilling the 6-hour credit required in biological 
science. 

2. Not more than 12 hours of biological science will be counted 
toward meeting the 60 credit hours required for admission. 

Prior to 1950, specifications (1) and (2) above should be followed 
whenever possible. 

In general, the principle applies that those courses given within 
the School of Nursing cannot be credited toward meeting admission 
requirements, because there is no allowance within the professional 
curriculum for electives. 

APPLICATION FOR ADMISSION 

A blank for formal application for admission to the School of Nurs- 
ing, containing full instructions, may be obtained by returning the 
form at the back of this bulletin to the Dean of the Cornell University- 
New York Hospital School of Nursing, 525 East Sixty-eighth Street, 
New York 21, N. Y. As one measure of suitability for nursing, certain 



12 SCHOOL OF NURSING 

psychometric tests are required before admission. The applicant is 
asked to meet the charge of approximately $5.00 for these tests. 

Arrangements for a personal interview will be made with the appli- 
cant whose record shows promise of meeting the requirements of the 
school. She will meet with a member of the Committee on Admissions 
of the school in New York, or if this is not practicable, with an alumna 
or other qualified person designated by the committee and living in 
the vicinity of the applicant. 

Candidates for admission must make a deposit of $25.00 upon noti- 
fication of acceptance to the school. The full amount is credited toward 
fees payable at registration. The deposit is not refundable if the candi- 
date withdraws her application. 

It is desirable that prospective applicants enroll with the school as 
early as possible, so that they may receive assistance in planning their 
programs in high school and college to gain the best possible educa- 
tional background preparatory to entering the School of Nursing. 

Applications will be accepted as long as there are vacancies in the 
entering class. To be assured consideration, however, formal applica- 
tion should be made during the second term of the first college year, 
if the applicant plans to enter this school after her second college 
year. When all reports are in for work completed during the first 
college year, the applicant will be accepted, pending satisfactory ful- 
fillment of all requirements. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR 
PROMOTION AND GRADUATION 

The established system of grading is a scale of F to A, with D as 
the lowest passing grade. An average of C for a given term is required 
for promotion without condition. A grade of C is required in the 
courses Nursing Arts I, Nursing Arts II, Pharmacology I. A grade be- 
low C in any clinical field of nursing practice or a term average which 
is less than C places a student on warning. This must be removed by 
the end of the next term to insure further promotion. A student on 
warning is ineligible to hold office in student organizations. 

A grade of I (Incomplete) is assigned if the work of a course is not 
completed because of illness or unavoidable absence and if, in the 
judgment of the instructor, the student has shown evidence that she 
can complete the course satisfactorily in a reasonable length of time. 

An F (Failure) in any given subject may necessitate withdrawal from 
the school unless the student's scholarship is exceptional in other re- 
spects, in which case repetition of the course may be recommended by 
the instructor, when the course is available. 

No more than one re-examination will be permitted in the case of 



REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION AND GRADUATION 13 

failure in the midterm and/or final examination in a course, and only 
upon the recommendation of the instructor and approval by the Dean. 
In case a re-examination is permitted it is the responsibility of the 
student to arrange with the instructor for a plan of study preparatory 
to it. A charge of $2.00 will be made for each re-examination. 

A cumulative average of C for three years' work is required for 
graduation. 

The school reserves the privilege of retaining in the school only those 
students who, in the judgment of the faculty, satisfy the requirements of 
scholarship, health, and personal suitability for the nursing profession. 

ADVANCED STANDING 

A student who has received her baccalaureate degree before admission 
may apply for a reduction in total time in clinical experience, thus 
reducing her time in the school by two to four months. An average of 
B in theory and in practice throughout the course is necessary for favor- 
able consideration. Exemption must be requested during the last term 
of the second year. 

DEGREE AND DIPLOMA 

The degree of Bachelor of Science in Nursing will be granted by 
Cornell University and a diploma in nursing by The New York Hos- 
pital, upon recommendation of the faculty of the School of Nursing, 
to candidates who have completed satisfactorily the prescribed course 
in nursing. 



Accreditation of the School 

This school is accredited by the New York State Department of 
Education and by the National League of Nursing Education. It is also 
an active member of the Association of Collegiate Schools of Nursing. 



State Registration for Graduates 

Graduates are eligible for admission to the examination for licensure 
administered by the Regents of the State of New York and are expected 
to take such an examination immediately upon completion of the 
course. In New York citizenship, or declared intention of becoming a 
citizen, is required. If citizenship is not completed within seven years 
from the declaration of intention, state licensure is revoked. If she 
prefers, the graduate may take State Board examinations in the state 
where she expects to practice rather than in New York State. 

Graduates are urged to take State Board examinations in New York 
State rather than in another state to avoid difficulties should they wish 
to practice in New York State at a future date. 



n 



Fees and Expenses 

Fees and other expenses which must be met by the student are as follows: 

First Second Third 

FEES (Effective Oct. 1919) Year Year Year Total 

Matriculation $ 10.00 $ 10.00 

Tuition 200.00 $150.00 $100.00 450.00 

Public Health Affiliation 60.00 60.00 

Laboratory 30.00 30.00 

Library 3.00 3.00 3.00 9.00 

Health 12.00 12.00 12.00 36.00 

Graduation 25.00 25.00 

Student Organization 5.25 5.25 5.25 15.75 

$260.25 $170.25 $205.25 $635.75 
OTHER EXPENSES (Subject to variation) 

Aprons and accessories of uniforms $ 34.00 $ 34.00 

Uniform shoes 12.90 $ 12.90 25.80 

Uniform sweater 5.00 5.00 

Uniform cape (optional) 17.60 17.60 

Gymnasium suit 1 1 .00 1 1 .00 

Books, keys, bandage scissors, and 

miscellaneous (approx.) 40.00 $ 5.00 5.00 50.00 

Rental laboratory coat 1.00 1.00 

Rental public health uniform 5.00 5.00 

Miscellaneous expenses in connection 

with field trips, etc 2.00 2.00 30.00 34.00 

$123.50 $ 7.00 $ 52.90 $183.40 

TOTAL FEES AND EXPENSES $383.75 $177.25 $258.15 $819.15 



METHOD OF PAYMENT 

Upon acceptance for admission a deposit of $25.00 is required. This is 
credited toward the tuition for the first year but is not refundable if the 
application is withdrawn. The $200.00 tuition for the first year is pay- 
able as follows: $25.00 upon acceptance, $125.00 at registration, and 
$50.00 at the beginning of the second term. Other first-year fees are pay- 
able at registration. 

Students will be billed for second and third year fees at the beginning 

15 



16 SCHOOL OF NURSING 

of each year. An exception is the fee for graduation which is payable 
at the beginning of the third term of the third year and is refundable 
if the student is not graduated. The student organization fee is payable 
to the class treasurer. 

The school reserves the right to change its fees as necessary to conform 
with economic trends. 

None of the articles listed under "Other Expenses" should be ob- 
tained before admission to the school. Uniform accessories, shoes, and 
sweater will be ordered after registration and are paid for upon de- 
livery. Estimated expenses for books include approximately $10.00 for 
optional purchases. A list of necessary personal equipment and the 
fees payable on registration day will be sent to each student when ac- 
cepted for admission. 

MAINTENANCE 

The student receives full maintenance (room, board, and laundry) 
without cost except during the public health affiliation when she may 
have to purchase luncheon in the district to which she is assigned. The 
necessary dresses (except the public health uniform) and caps are pro- 
vided without charge. Items of the uniform for which the student pays 
are listed under "Other Expenses." In case of illness, limited infirmary 
and hospital care is provided without cost. (See "Health Service") 

SCHOLARSHIPS AND FINANCIAL AID 
FUND OF THE COMMITTEE FOR SCHOLARSHIPS 

The Committee for Scholarships for the Cornell University-New 
York Hospital School of Nursing, a newly-organized group of lay 
women, has made available a limited number of scholarships to enter- 
ing students on the basis of all-round good record as indicated by 
academic work, participation in school or community activities, special 
abilities and personal qualities indicating promise. All students apply- 
ing for admission are considered for these scholarships, but students 
who are interested are encouraged to so indicate in their applications 
for admission. Scholarships are awarded by the Executive Faculty on 
the recommendation of the Admissions Committee. 

A few scholarships are available to second and third year students 
and are awarded on the basis of good scholastic standing and need for 
financial assistance. Application should be made to the Dean of the 
School at least 2 months before the first term of the ensuing year. 
Awards are made by the Executive Faculty on recommendation of the 
Promotions Committees. 




■Candlelight carol singing in the Residence is a tradition of the Ch 



nstmas season. 




The student takes an active part in planning patient care with members of the staff] 

flHH 




A bridge game in one of the sitting rooms provided on each floor. 



SCHOLARSHIPS 17 

W. K. KELLOGG FOUNDATION SCHOLARSHIP FUND 
and ARTHUR WILLIAMS SCHOLARSHIP FUND 

A few scholarships are available to students from these Funds on the 
same basis as indicated on page 16. 

W. K. KELLOGG FOUNDATION LOAN FUND 

Grants not to exceed S200 in any year are available to students on a 
basis of need, character, and academic achievement. Application should 
be made to the Dean of the School. 

STUDENT LOAN FUND 

Loans are available through this fund, after the first term in the 
school, for those students who show promise in nursing and are in 
need of financial aid. 

LOUISA WARDNER SCUDDER FUND 

Income from this fund is used for purposes of recreation or to finance 
a needed rest or convalescence for one or more students. 

IRENE SUTLIFFE SCHOLARSHIP FUND 

Through the generosity and foresight of the alumnae of the school 
and in honor of Irene Sutliffe, the Director of the School from 1886 to 
1902, scholarship grants are available to graduates of the school for 
postgraduate study. 



Health Service 



Because good health is of the utmost importance, the school main- 
tains a health service under the general direction of a committee of the 
faculty with a physician appointed to the staff of the school. Upon 
admission to the school a physical examination by the school physician 
and a chest X-ray are required. Subsequently a chest X-ray is required 
every six months, and a physical examination during each school year. 

Schick and Dick tests and immunization for positive reaction to the 
Schick test will be required of all students after admission to the school. 
Mantoux tests will be given during the pre-clinical period and for those 
who are negative will be repeated at regular intervals. In addition B. 
C. G. vaccine is provided to negative reactors. 

A well-equipped infirmary with necessary staff is maintained in the 
Nurses' Residence. Gratuitous infirmary care for minor illnesses will 
be limited to four weeks at any one time in the case of all students. For 
more serious illnesses students will be cared for gratuitously in the 
hospital for not more than two weeks at any one time for the first-year 
students, and not more than four weeks at any one time for second and 
third year students. Expenses for special nursing care and special 
therapies must be borne by the student or her family. 

All students pay a Health Fee totaling S36.00 during the three years. 
This fee covers examinations, immunizations, and care in the Hospital 
and Infirmary, as referred to above. Only emergency surgery is included. 
This is defined as surgical procedures which in the opinion of the 
school physician or a consulting surgeon of The New York Hospital 
staff, are necessary for the immediate welfare and safety of the student. 
The fee does not include surgery for the correction of chronic remedial 
defects. 

If in the opinion of the school authorities, the condition of a stu- 
dent's health makes it unwise for her to remain in the school, she may 
be required to withdraw, either temporarily or permanently, at any 
time. 



18 



Vacations and Absences 



A vacation of four weeks is given in each of the first two years and 
three weeks in the third. Students who have an exemption of time are 
not granted a vacation in the third year. All vacations are arranged 
to conform to the requirements of the educational program. 

As a result of absences the repetition of a course of study or special 
examinations may be required, class registration may be changed and 
in necessary instances nursing practice will have to be made up. 



Activities 



RESIDENCE FACILITIES 

Students live in the Nurses' Residence, a sixteen-story fireproof 
building adjacent to the hospital. Every effort has been made in the 
construction and equipment of the residence to provide for the normal 
and healthy life of students and staff. 

Comfortable lounges, reading, reception, and dining rooms are lo- 
cated on the first and ground floors. Students have attractively furnished 
single rooms with running water and each of the eight student floors 
is equipped with ample baths, showers, and toilet facilities, a laundry, 
and a common sitting room with adjoining kitchenette for informal 
gatherings. 

RECREATIONAL FACILITIES 

Believing that the education of young women today must include 
healthful social relationships, generous provision for this development 
in the life of the student has been made. 

An excellent browsing library of fiction and biography includes both 
current and standard works and many magazines of general interest. A 
branch of the New York Public Library is located within a few blocks 
of the Hospital. 

In addition to the ample lounges for informal and formal use, a 
large, gymnasium-auditorium is located on the first floor of the resi- 
dence. Other game rooms, sun porches, and a hobby room are also 
available for general use. Students who have had preparation in music 

19 



20 SCHOOL OF NURSING 

are urged to keep up their interest and participation. Student activities 
planned jointly with the Cornell University Medical College are a 
regular part of the recreation, and dramatic productions are usually 
presented once or twice each year. Students are hostesses at Open House 
every Sunday evening when friends are welcomed to games, conversa- 
tion, and refreshments. 

By arrangement with a nearby school, an indoor swimming pool and 
an additional large gymnasium are regularly available. Through the 
Students' Athletic Association arrangements are made for joining with 
other schools of nursing in special sports events. Beach equipment and 
an outdoor grill are available through the House Committee. 

To insure the full benefit of proper use of these facilities a Residence 
Director and well-qualified assistants for special activities are in charge. 
House activities are planned by the House Committee, which is made 
up of representatives of those living in the Residence, of staff members 
living out, and of alumnae. Guest rooms are usually available for friends 
and relatives. 

The cultural opportunities of New York City are almost limitless in 
music, art, ballet, theatre, and libraries. Through the House Com- 
mittee students and graduates enjoy the benefits of such opportunities 
as membership in the Metropolitan Museum of Art, American Museum 
of Natural History, Metropolitan Opera Guild, Institute of Arts and 
Sciences, and the Student and Professional Ticket Service. 

An annual activity fee, paid by students and graduates alike, supports 
the varied activities. 

The students edit and publish a paper, The Blue Plaidette, every 
two months. Each class produces its own yearbook, known as The 
Blue Plaid. 

There are two religious clubs with voluntary memberships. Guest 
speakers and planned forums provide an opportunity for exchange of 
thought on many problems. 

SCHOOL GOVERNMENT 

The students take a large share of responsibility for the regulation 
of their own affairs. All belong to the Student Organization which 
functions with the Faculty Committee on Student Affairs in all matters 
relating to social and professional conduct. 

As in other parts of the University, one rule governs the conduct 
of students in the School of Nursing: "A student is expected to show 
both within and without the School unfailing respect for order, 
morality, personal honor, and the rights of others." The rule is 
construed as applicable at all times, in all places, to all students. 






ALUMNAE ASSOCIATION 21 

COUNSELING SERVICES 

The School maintains active counseling services which are available 
at all times to any student who needs assistance, either in connection 
with routine matters that may come up in her normal work in the 
school or in connection with special personal problems. 

The Counselor of Students cooperates with the faculty to see that 
those students who need help on questions of educational program, 
finances, health, extracurricular activities and the like, are directed to 
those members of the staff who are best qualified to be of assistance in 
relation to the particular problem at hand. 

The objective of the Counseling program is to make it possible for 
any student to obtain such guidance as she may require in any phase 
of her life while in the School of Nursing. 

ALUMNAE ASSOCIATION 

The Cornell University-New York Hospital School of Nursing 
Alumnae Association, originally the Alumnae Association, of The New 
York Hospital School of Nursing, was organized in 1893. It was one 
of the ten alumnae associations which helped to bring about the na- 
tional professional organization of nurses first known as the Nurses 
Associated Alumnae of the United States and Canada. This is now 
the American Nurses' Association. In 1945 the Alumnae Association 
became a part of the Cornell University Alumni Association. 

One of the lounges of the Residence is known as the Alumnae Room, 
and the alumnae meetings and many alumnae functions are held in 
this room. 



Curriculum 



The curriculum covers a period of three calendar years, the full 
time being spent in residence at the school, with the exception of 
vacations which total eleven weeks. Each year is divided into three 
terms, two of sixteen weeks and the summer term of twenty weeks 
which includes vacation. 

In each clinical service related classes, conferences, and bedside in- 
structions are given concurrently with practice. Throughout the course 
emphasis is placed on disease prevention and health instruction. In 
several of the clinical services the student receives experience in eve- 
ning and night duty, so that she may have the complete picture of the 
nursing needs of patients. 

An introduction to community nursing and to the various agencies 
assisting at the time of illness is provided through conferences with 
the staff members of community health agencies, observation in various 
community organizations, discussions centered around family health, 
and participation in the referral of patients requiring nursing care 
after discharge from the Hospital. An eight-week period of supervised 
practice in family health service is provided through affiliation with 
the Visiting Nurse Service of New York, a family health agency. 

The school reserves the right to make changes in the curriculum as 
the need arises. Following is the program of theory and experience 
during the three years in the school. 

FIRST YEAR 

The first twenty-five weeks are devoted primarily to class and labora- 
tory assignments with a limited amount of nursing practice in the 
pavilions of the Hospital. There is one week of vacation at Christmas 
time. During the last half of the year the student is assigned to the 
Department of Medicine and Surgery for theory and practice in those 
clinical fields. The services in which she has experience include in 
addition to general medicine and general surgery, such specialties as 
ophthalmology, otolaryngology, neurology, and communicable disease. 
A vacation of three weeks is given in the last term. The following 
courses are taken: 



22 










CURRICULUM 






S 








Term 


Class 


Weeks 


Course 


Number 


Description 


credits 


hours 


practice 


Nursing 


120 


Orientation 





12 




Nursing 


121 


Nursing Arts I 


2 


158 




Nursing 


122 


Nursing Arts II 


2 


196 




Nursing 


124 


Pharmacology I 


0.5 


15 




Nursing 


125 


Pharmacology II 


2 


30 




Biological Science 


100 


Anatomy 


2 


60 




Biological Science 


101 


Physiology 


1.5 


50 




Biological Science 


102 


Chemistry 


2 


55 




Biological Science 


103 


Microbiology 


1.5 


50 




Biological Science 


104 


Clinical Pathology 


0.5 


20 




Social Science 


110 


Personality Growth & Develop- 












ment 


1 


15 




Social Science 


111 


Social and Health Aspects of 












Nursing 


2 


30 




Social Science 


115 


Professional Adjustments I 


1 


15 




Social Science 


117 


Physical Education 





55 




Nutrition 


130 


Nutrition and Cooking 


1 


30 




Nutrition 


131 


Diet Therapy 


1 


30 




Medical Nursing 


140 


Medicine 


2.5 


37 




Medical Nursing 


141 


Communicable Disease 


1 


17 




Medical Nursing 


142-143 


Principles and Practice of Medical 
Nursing including Communi- 












cable Disease Nursing 


4 


45 


12 


Surgical Nursing 


150 


Surgery (including surgical speci- 












alties) 


2.5 


38 




Surgical Nursing 


151-152 


Principles and Practice of Surgical 












Nursing 


3.5 


30 


12 


Total First Year 






33.5 


988 


24 



23 



*In addition to the class hours indicated above, each practice period includes two or more hours a 
week of bedside instruction and conference directly related to the nursing care of those patients for whom 
the student has some responsibility. 

SECOND YEAR 

The three terms of the Second Year are devoted to classes and practice 
in the Pediatric Clinic and Child Development Institute, the Woman's 
Clinic, and the Department of Medicine and Surgery. There is a four- 
week vacation during the summer term. 

In the Pediatric Clinic and Child Development Institute the student 
has an opportunity to rotate through the Out-Patient Department, 
Nursery School, the premature nursery, the infant floor, and the unit 
for older children. In the Woman's Clinic assignments for practice 
include the Out-Patient Department, delivery floor, nursery, post- 
partum unit, and gynecological division. During the period in the 
Department of Medicine and Surgery experience is provided in the 
General Operating Rooms, in Diet Therapy practice, and in com- 
municable disease nursing. Courses are as follows: 



24 



SCHOOL OF NURSING 









Term 


Class 


Weeks 


Course 


Number 


Description 


credits 


hours 


practice 


Social Science 


114 


History of Nursing 


1.5 


24 




Pediatric Nursing 


170 


Pediatrics 


1 


20 




Pediatric Nursing 


171 


Development of Behavior in Chil- 












dren 


2 


30 




Pediatric Nursing 


172-173 Principles and Practice of Pediat- 












ric Nursing 


6 


50 


16 


Obst. & Gyn. 


160 


Obstetrics and Gynecology 


2 


30 




Nursing 












Obst. & Gyn. 


161-162 


Principles and Practice of Obstet- 








Nursing 




ric & Gynecological Nursing 


5 


30 


16 


Medical Nursing 


143 A 


Practice of Communicable Disease 












Nursing 


1 




4 


Nutrition 


132 


Practice of Diet Therapy 


1 




4 


Surgical Nursing 


153 


Principles and Practice of Opera- 












tive Technique 


2.5 


15 


8 


Social Science 


117 


Physical Education 





32 




Total Second Year 






22 


231 


48 



*In addition to the class hours indicated above, each practice period includes two or more hours a 
week of bedside instruction and conference directly related to the nursing care of those patients for whom 
the student has some responsibility. 



THIRD YEAR 

The three terms of the third year provide many interesting oppor- 
tunities and experiences. Sixteen weeks are spent in the Payne Whitney 
Psychiatric Clinic where the student gains a keen appreciation of the 
causes of mental and emotional illness as well as a knowledge of the 
newer methods of therapy for their relief. 

An eight-week affiliation is provided with the Visiting Nurse Service 
of New York, a family health agency. During this time the student has 
an opportunity, under supervision, to care for patients in their homes 
and to teach members of the family to give necessary care between visits 
of the nurse. Closely preceding or following this, there is a four-week 
period spent in the Medical-Surgical units of the Out-Patient Depart- 
ment, where ambulatory patients are treated. This is followed by four 
weeks in the private patient service. 

During one term of this last year, the Senior returns once more to 
the Department of Medicine and Surgery. Because of her increased 
knowledge and experience she is now ready to accept almost complete 
responsibility for analysing and planning to meet the nursing needs 
of her patients. She receives instruction in planning the time and 
assignments of staff personnel, and has Senior charge duty for a period 
of six weeks. There are three weeks of vacation during the summer 
term. Courses in the third year are: 



CURRICULUM 



25 



Course 

Psychiatric Nurs- 
ing 

Psychiatric Nurs- 
ing 

Social Science 
Social Science 

Social Science 
Medical Nursing 

Medical Nursing 



Number Description 

180 Psychiatry 



Term Class Weeks 
credits hours practice* 

2 30 



181-182- Principles and Practice of Psy- 
183 chiatric Nursing — including 

special therapies 
112 Family and Community Health 
113-113A Principles and Practice in Public 
Health Nursing 
1 1 3B Practice in Out-Patient Nursing 
144 Practice in Care of Private Pa- 
tients 
145-143B Senior Medical and Surgical 



152A 



Nursing (including Nutrition 

clinic) 
Emergency Nursing 
Professional Adjustments II 
Physical Education 



*In addition to the class hours indicated above, each practice period includes two or more hours a 
week of bedside instruction and conference directly related to the nursing care of those patients for whom 
the student has some responsibility. 



Nursing 


123 


Social Science 


116 


Social Science 


117 


Total Third Year 




Grand Totals 





5 


30 


16 


1 


20 




2 


30 


8 


0.5 




4 


0.5 




4 


5 


16 


17 


1 


22 




1 


15 







32 




18 


195 


49 


73.5 


1414 


121 



Description of Courses 



BIOLOGICAL AND PHYSICAL SCIENCES 

100. ANATOMY. This course includes both gross and microscopical anatomy. The 
gross anatomy is taught by lectures, demonstrations, and student dissection of the 
cadaver. The microscopical work is directly correlated with the gross dissection and 
includes a detailed study of prepared slides. Significant embryological information 
is included in the lectures. 

60 Hours. First Year. Dr. HINSEY, Dr. GEOHEGAN, Dr. BERRY. 

101. PHYSIOLOGY. The course is directed toward an understanding of the prin- 
ciples involved in the functioning of the human body and the integration of its 
various systems. It is an essential prerequisite to the study of nursing arts, nutrition, 
and pathology. Lectures, recitations, demonstrations, and laboratory. 

50 Hours. First Year. Dr. DUBOIS, Miss RYNBERGEN, Dr. RICHARDS, Miss IBA. 

102. CHEMISTRY. A course designed to acquaint students with some of the funda- 
mental principles of physiological chemistry as these apply to nursing practice. 
Studies of water balance, the digestion and metabolism of food and the composition 
of blood, milk, and urine are included. Lectures, recitations, demonstrations, and 
laboratory. 

55 Hours. First Year. Dr. DU VIGNEAUD, Miss RYNBERGEN, Dr. GILDER, Dr. 
LEE, Miss IBA. 

103. MICROBIOLOGY. An introduction to the study of microorganisms, particu- 
larly the microbial agents of disease. Sources, modes of spread and prevention of 
infectious diseases; principles and practice of asepsis. Applications of bacteriology 
and immunology to the diagnosis, prevention, and treatment of infectious diseases. 
50 Hours. First Year. Dr. NEILL, Dr. HEHRE. 

104. CLINICAL PATHOLOGY. A brief orientation course designed to acquaint the 
student with the principles of general Pathology and with the more common clinical 
laboratory procedures. The pathologic changes associated with inflammation, neo- 
plasm, and cardiovascular disease are presented and illustrated by kodochromes, 
gross specimens, and microscopic slides. The techniques of routine urinalysis, blood 
grouping, RH determination, and blood transfusion are demonstrated. 

20 Hours. First Year. Dr. KELLNER. 

SOCIAL SCIENCES 

110. PERSONALITY GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT. A presentation of the 
biological, sociological, and psychological factors which contribute to the formation 
of the adult personality. The various stages of personality development, psychological 
responses to emotions, and emotional factors in physical illness are discussed. 
Particular emphasis is placed upon the nurse-patient relationship and the adjust- 
ment of the individual student to the nursing profession. 

15 Hours. First Year. Dr. KOHL. 

111. SOCIAL AND HEALTH ASPECTS OF NURSING. Study of the patient as an 
individual, conditioned by psychological and cultural influences. Interrelationship 

26 



DESCRIPTION OF COURSES 27 

of individual, family, and community health, and the work of the nurse in pre- 
vention of disease and the promotion of health. Lectures, conferences, reports, excur- 
sions to community agencies. 
30 Hours. First Year. Miss GOIK, Miss SOULE. 

112. FAMILY AND COMMUNITY HEALTH. An introduction to the study of 
health problems and services in relation to the family and community. Consideration 
is given to the preparation of public health nurses and to the role of the nurse in 
the total health program. 

20 Hours. Third Year. Dr. SMILLIE and Miss GOIK. 

113. INTRODUCTION TO PUBLIC HEALTH NURSING. A planned program 
of group and individual conferences designed to acquaint the student with the 
functions of a family health agency as part of a community health program; to 
familiarize her with the responsibilities of a field nurse in carrying out these func- 
tions, and to point out the way these functions and responsibilities demonstrate good 
public health practice. 

30 Hours. Third Year. Miss RANDALL, Miss MOLE, Miss NOTTER, and staff. 

113-A. PRACTICE IN PUBLIC HEALTH NURSING. Activities include health 
supervision of infants, school and pre-school children, and adults; maternity nursing, 
morbidity nursing in the home. Through carefully graded observation, case con- 
ference, and supervised practice, the student is given increasing responsibility for 
health work with a small, selected group of families. This experience is by affiliation 
with the Visiting Nurse Service of New York (formerly known as the Henry Street 
Visiting Nurse Service) which provides a generalized public health nursing service 
including bedside care of the sick in their homes. 
Eight Weeks. Third Year. Miss RANDALL, Miss MOLE, Miss NOTTER, and staff. 

113-B. PRACTICE IN OUT-PATIENT NURSING. Experience is offered in selected 
clinics of the Medical and Surgical services; there are related family studies, con- 
ferences with members of the Social Service Department, visits to community agencies. 
Four Weeks. Third Year. Miss REID, Miss McMULLEN, and staff. 

114. HISTORY OF NURSING. A survey of nursing from its early beginnings to 
modern times. Nursing history considered in relation to the development of modern 
concepts of democracy and science. 

24 Hours. Second Year. Miss MacLEAN. 

115. PROFESSIONAL ADJUSTMENTS I. Consideration of the philosophical and 
ethical foundations of conduct and their application to the profession of nursing. 
Problems related to group life and adjustments to patients and co-workers are pre- 
sented by students for discussion and analysis. 

15 Hours. First Year. Miss LYONS. 

116. PROFESSIONAL ADJUSTMENTS II. Through a general survey of the nursing 
field, the student has an opportunity to study the trends in the profession, the need 
and opportunities for specialized preparation, the importance and types of legisla- 
tion, the activities of professional organizations and the obligations of their members. 
Lectures and conferences. 

15 Hours. Third Year. Miss DUNBAR, Miss PARKER and special lecturers. 

117. PHYSICAL EDUCATION. It is a major aim of this course to provide each 
student with the knowledge of good body mechanics in work and play. Through 
individual and group sports, she has the opportunity to become adept in the activity 
which she enjoys the most. A reasonable degree of skill in one or more sports is an 
important factor in the development of a happy recreational life for the individual. 
55 Hours, First Year; 32 Hours, Second Year; 32 Hours, Third Year. Miss McDER- 
MOTT and assistant. 



28 SCHOOL OF NURSING 

NURSING AND ALLIED ARTS - GENERAL 

120. ORIENTATION. This course gives the beginning student a general concept 
of the field of nursing and of the responsibilities and obligations of the individual 
who chooses this profession. It emphasizes the importance of the physical and mental 
health of the nurse as it relates to her personal life and is reflected in her work. 
12 Hours, First Year; 1 Hour, Second Year; 1 Hour, Third Year. Miss DUNBAR, 
Miss LYONS, Mrs. OVERHOLSER, Dr. LANSDOWN, Miss McDERMOTT, Mrs. 
JORDAN, Miss LAMBERT. 

121. NURSING ARTS I. This course is designed to give the student an understand- 
ing of the basic physical needs of individuals and of how best these may be met in 
relation to the nursing care of a patient. There is emphasis upon desirable nurse- 
patient relationships, and instruction is given in the simpler nursing procedures. 
Practice includes the application of basic principles of nursing in the Nursing Arts 
Laboratory, in the Surgical Supply Room, and in the care of convalescent patients 
on the pavilions of the Hospital. 

158 Hours. First Year. Miss MADORE, Miss HUNTER, Miss ZORN. 

122. NURSING ARTS II. A course designed to give the student an understanding 
of advanced nursing principles and procedures, and to assist in the development 
and perfection of skills. It is correlated with lectures on the medical and surgical 
aspects of disease, and with instruction in nursing care pertinent to these conditions. 
Practice includes application of advanced nursing principles and jDrocedures in the 
Nursing Arts Laboratory, and in the care of patients on the pavilions of the Hospital. 
There is opportunity for observation of nursing in the Out-Patient Department. 

196 Hours. First Year. Miss MADORE, Miss HUNTER. 

123. EMERGENCY NURSING. This course deals with the application of nursing 
principles to emergency situations in the home and community. Lectures and demon- 
strations. First Aid certificate granted by American Red Cross. 

22 Hours. Third Year. Dr. REDDEN. 

124. PHARMACOLOGY I. Designed to familiarize the student with the systems 
used in weighing and measuring drugs, methods of making solutions and calcu- 
lating dosages. It stresses the nurse's responsibility in the administration of medicines. 
15 Hours. First Year. Miss McCLUSKEY. 

125. PHARMACOLOGY II. A course planned to help the student acquire knowledge 
of the facts and principles of drug therapy and of the responsibilities of the nurse 
in the administration of medicines. It includes a study of the important and com- 
monly used drugs, their physiological and therapeutic actions, dosage, administration, 
idiosyncracies and toxic symptoms. Emphasis is given to the accurate administration 
of drugs and the careful observation of their effects. 

30 Hours. First Year. Dr. CATTELL, and Nurse Instructor. 

NUTRITION 

130. NUTRITION AND COOKERY. A basic course in normal adulf nutrition and 
in food preparation. (The nutrition requirements in childhood and in pregnancy are 
discussed during the student's practice on pediatric and obstetric services in the 
second year.) 

30 Hours. First Year. Miss RYNBERGEN, Miss IBA. 

131. DIET THERAPY. A course designed to present the underlying principles in the 
treatment of disease by means of special dietaries; given concurrently with the lec- 
tures in Medical and Surgical Diseases. This course is supplemented by conference 



DESCRIPTION OF COURSES 29 

work during the student's practice on medical and surgical services. Lectures, reci- 
tations, and laboratory. 

30 Hours. First Year. Miss RYNBERGEN, Miss IBA. 

132. PRACTICE OF DIET THERAPY. The application of the principles of diet 
therapy to the care of patients in supervised practice on the pavilions of the Hospital 
and in the Out-Patient Clinic. 

I Weeks, Second Year; 2 Weeks, Third Year. Miss STEPHENSON, Miss RYN- 
BERGEN, Miss IBA, Miss TILLOTSON, Miss WEST, Miss RICHMOND. 

MEDICAL NURSING 

140. MEDICINE. Medical aspects of diseases are considered in these lectures and 
clinics. Material presented will supplement, emphasize, and interpret required read- 
ing covering etiology, sources of infection, symptomatology, usual course pathology, 
complications, treatment, prognosis, and prevention. 

37 Hours. First Year. Dr. BARR and staff. 

111. COMMUNICABLE DISEASES. A study of communicable diseases, including 
tuberculosis. Special emphasis is placed upon etiology, modes of transmission and 
prevention. Lectures and clinics. 

17 Hours. First Year. Dr. BARR and staff. 

112. PRINCIPLES OF MEDICAL NURSING INCLUDING COMMUNICABLE 
DISEASE NURSING. A study by lectures and demonstrations of the principles and 
methods of nursing which are specific to this division of nursing practice. 

45 Hours. First Year. Miss KLEIN, Miss NEWTON, Miss McCLUSKEY. 
143-143A-143B. PRACTICE OF MEDICAL NURSING INCLUDING COMMUNI- 
CABLE DISEASE NURSING. Supervised practice and study of the application of 
medical nursing principles and methods to the care of patients on the medical 
pavilions of the Hospital. In addition, students study and practice medical aseptic 
nursing as related to the care of patients suffering from communicable diseases 
including tuberculosis. In the third year practice includes care of patients and 
managerial experience during day, evening, and night. Demonstrations and con- 
ferences. 

25 Weeks. First, Second, and Third Years. (Includes 8 w y eeks of communicable disease 
nursing.) Miss KLEIN, Miss HARMON, Miss NEWTON, Miss McCLUSKEY, Miss 
HILLS, Mrs. BROCKMAN. 

144. PRACTICE FN CARE OF PRIVATE PATIENTS. Application of principles 
of medical and surgical nursing to the care of private patients. 4 Weeks. Third Year. 
Miss POOR, Miss NIELSEN, and staff. 

145. SENIOR MEDICAL AND SURGICAL NURSING PRINCIPLES. In this course 
emphasis is placed upon the elementary principles of management and teaching 
problems; the total nursing needs of the individual patient are emphasized. The 
interrelationship of various departments, planning of ward schedules and work with 
other individuals and groups concerned with the care of patients, is included. 

16 Hours. Third Year. Miss HARMON. 

SURGICAL NURSING 

150. SURGERY. Surgical aspects of diseases are presented in these lectures and 
clinics. Factors determining the need for surgical interference are discussed and the 
major steps in the operation outlined. Special emphasis is placed upon signs, symp- 
toms, and observations which should be made both preceding and following opera- 
tion. 

38 Hours. First Year. Dr. GLENN and staff. 



30 SCHOOL OF NURSING 

151. PRINCIPLES OF SURGICAL NURSING. Through lectures and demonstrations 
students are taught the principles and methods of surgical asepsis and the nursing of 
surgical patients. In the third year emphasis is placed upon managerial and teaching 
problems, and current developments requiring new methods of treatment. 
30 Hours, First year; 8 Hours, Third Year. Miss KLEIN, Miss FEDDER, Miss 
HARMON, Miss SWANWICK, Miss DANIELS, Mrs. GINSBERG. 
152-152A. PRACTICE OF SURGICAL NURSING. Supervised practice and study of 
the application of nursing principles to the care of patients on surgical pavilions of 
the Hospital. In the third year practice includes care of patients and managerial 
experience during the day, evening, and night. Demonstrations and conferences. 
21 Weeks. First and Third Years. Miss KLEIN, Miss FEDDER, Miss HARMON, Mrs. 
GINSBERG, Miss HILLS, Miss DANIELS, Miss SWANWICK, Mrs. BROCKMAN, 
and staff. 

153. PRINCIPLES AND PRACTICE OF OPERATIVE TECHNIQUE. This course 
is designed to give the student a more thorough understanding of surgical aseptic 
technique. She is given an opportunity to observe and assist with operative procedures, 
to relate this experience to the total care of surgical patients, and to gain an ap- 
preciation of the qualities and abilities essential to effective nursing in this field. 
15 Hours. Lectures, demonstrations, and conferences; 8 Weeks Practice. Second Year. 
Miss CARBERY, Miss DeLELYS, and staff. 



OBSTETRIC AND GYNECOLOGICAL NURSING 

160. OBSTETRICS AND GYNECOLOGY. This course deals with the clinical, 
anatomical, physiological, and pathological aspects of pregnancy, labor, and the 
puerperium, as well as of the female generative organs. Consideration is given to 
nutritional needs, psychosomatic approach in the prevention of complications, family- 
sociologic relationships in child bearing, the nature, development, and adjustment of 
the newborn. 

30 Hours. Second Year. Medical staff of the Woman's Clinic. Miss RYNBERGEN, 
Miss IB A. 

161. PRINCIPLES OF OBSTETRIC AND GYNECOLOGICAL NURSING. This 
course emphasizes the importance of prenatal observation and instruction; infant 
care, obstetric and gynecologic procedures, current modes and trends in therapy. 
30 Hours. Second Year. Miss HICKCOX, Miss WALTERS, Mrs. HOWELL, Miss 
COLETTI, Miss DUSTAN, Miss JUMP, Miss BOYLE, Mrs. MIGUEL. 

162. PRACTICE OF OBSTETRIC AND GYNECOLOGICAL NURSING. Students 
observe and care for infants, obstetric and gynecological patients under supervision 
in the pavilions, nurseries, labor, and delivery rooms, and Out-patient Department. 
Nursing care studies, conferences, and field trips are supplementary features of the 
course. 

16 Weeks. Second Year. Miss HICKCOX, Miss WALTERS, Mrs. HOWELL, Miss 
DUSTAN, Miss JUMP, Miss BOYLE, Miss COLETTI, Mrs. MIGUEL. 

PEDIATRIC NURSING 

170. PEDIATRICS. This course presents a study of the representative diseases of 
infancy and childhood and of the many factors which contribute to health and 
diseases. 

20 Hours. Second Year. Dr. LEVINE and staff. 

171. DEVELOPMENT OF BEHAVIOR IN CHILDREN. A study of the normal 
child and his behavior. The susceptibility of the child's behavior responses to the 



DESCRIPTION OF COURSES 31 

various details of family life and of school will be emphasized. Lectures and reci- 
tations. 
30 Hours. Second Year. Instructor to be announced. 

172. PRINCIPLES OF PEDIATRIC NURSING. The basic principles in the care 
of sick infants and children are taught in conjunction with the social, educational,' 
and nutritional aspects of their treatment and behavior as growing children. 

50 Hours. Second Year. Miss SCHUBERT, Miss FERGUSON, Miss STOKES, Miss 
WOODFALL and staff, Miss RYXBERGEN, Miss IBA. 

173. PRACTICE OF PEDIATRIC NURSING. This consists of supervised experience 
in aseptic nursing methods in the care of infants and children in the pavilion, for- 
mula laboratory, premature nursery, and Out-Patient Department. Case presenta- 
tions, nursing care plans and conferences. 

16 Weeks. Second Year. Miss SCHUBERT, Miss FERGUSON, Miss STOKES, Miss 
STEIGERWALT, Miss WOODFALL and staff, Miss PEARSON, Miss KIERNAN, 
Miss SIMMONS. 

PSYCHIATRIC NURSING 

180. PSYCHIATRY. A course of study designed to acquaint students with psycho- 
pathic conditions, their pathology and treatment. Included in this course is an 
historical survey of psychiatry and the mental hygiene movement; a discussion of 
the problems most frequently found in the different periods of human develop- 
ment: nursery school age, pre-puberty, adolescent, climactic, and senile. An intro- 
duction to the techniques and social agencies available in helping people meet their 
problems. 

30 Hours. Third Year. Dr. DIETHELM and staff. 

181. PRINCIPLES OF PSYCHIATRIC NURSING. This course is organized to give 
students an understanding of the basic principles in the nursing care of patients 
with personality disorders and the nursing techniques used in their treatment. 
Emphasis is placed on exaggerated emotional reactions as symptomatic of both 
physical and mental illness. 

30 Hours. Third Year. Miss JOINYILLE, Miss ZIERING, and staff. Miss PAIGE. 

182. PRACTICE OF PSYCHIATRIC NURSING. This consists of supervised experi- 
ence in" the care of the emotionally ill adult patient. Students have an opportunity to 
observe and care for the patient during the acute phase of his illness as well as 
during his convalescence. Conferences, symptomology studies, case studies, and clinical 
presentations. 

15 Weeks. Third Year. Miss JOINYILLE, Miss ZIERING, Mrs. WHITAKER, Miss 
GNAU, and staff. 

183. SPECIAL THERAPEUTICS IN PSYCHIATRIC NURSING. An opportunity 
is given the student for observation and practice in occupational and recreational 
therapies, with special emphasis on needs of the individual patient. Conferences and 
supervised practice. 

1 Week. Third Year. Miss SPARGO, Miss BRINDLE. 



Administration 

JOINT ADMINISTRATIVE BOARD OF 
THE UNIVERSITY AND THE HOSPITAL 

Edmund Ezra Day, Chairman 
Stanhope Bayne-Jones, President 

Edmund Ezra Day, President of the 

University ^ Board of Trustees 

Neal Dow Becker \ of 

Joseph P. Ripley J Cornell University 

William Harding Jackson, President \ Board of Governors 

Henry S. Sturgis, Treasurer j, of 

Langdon P. Marvin J The New York Hospital 

John W. Davis 

COUNCIL OF THE SCHOOL OF NURSING 

Dr. Edmund E. Day, Chairman President of the University 

Neal Dow Becker Trustee of the University 

A. Conger Goodyear Governor of the Hospital 

Langdon P. Marvin Governor of the Hospital 

Dr. Lucile Allen Dean of Women, Cornell University 

Mrs. August Belmont Representative-at-Large 

Helen Daum* . . Director of the School of Nursing and Nursing Service, 

Flower Fifth Avenue Hospital 

Marian G. Randall Director of the Visiting Nurse Service of 

New York City 

Dr. Joseph C. Hinsey Dean of Cornell Medical College 

Dr. W. G. Smillie Professor of Public Health and Preventive 

Medicine, Cornell Medical College 
Dr. David P. Barr. . . .President of the Medical Board of the Hospital 

Laurence G. Payson Acting Director of The New York Hospital 

Virginia M. Dunbar Dean of the School of Nursing 



* Nominated by the Alumnae Association 

OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION 

Edmund Ezra Day, Ph.D., LL.D President of the University 

32 




A student weighs a small patient in the Well-Baby Clinic, Department of Pedi 



atncs. 




Students practice procedures in the Nursing Arts Laboratory. 




Cornell medical students are frequent guests at dances in the Nurses Residence. 



ADMINISTRATION 



33 



Stanhope Bayne-Jones, M.D.. .President, Joint Administrative Board 

Virginia M. Dunbar, M.A., R.N Dean 

Bessie A. R. Parker, B.S., R.N Associate Dean 

Veronica Lyons, M.A., R.N Assistant Dean 

Victoria Frederick, M.A Counselor of Students 

Mary T. McDermott, M.A Director of the Residence 

Mrs. Claire Calhoun, M.A Assistant Director of the Residence 

Mrs. Helene Jamieson Jordan Director of Public Information 

Flora J. Bergstrom Librarian 

Frances Lansdown, M.D School Physician 

Mary J. Sherfey, M.D Consulting Psychiatrist 

ASSISTANTS IN ADMINISTRATION 

Mrs. Gladys Hatch Secretary to the Dean 

Margaret Vogel Secretary 

Mrs. Helenmarie Matlin Registrar 

Mrs. Elizabeth Sloane Assistant Registrar 



COMMITTEES OF THE FACULTY 

Executive Faculty: President Day, Chairman 

Miss Dunbar Miss Carbery Miss Reid 

Miss Parker Miss Schubert, Miss Joinville 

Miss Lyons Secretary Miss Poor 

Dr. Hinsey Miss Hickcox Dr. Bayne-Jones, 

Miss Moore Mrs. Overholser ex officio 

Miss Klein 
(One additional representative from Medical College Faculty to be 
appointed) 

Committee on Admissions Miss Klein, Chairman 

Committee on Curriculum Miss Lyons, Chairman 

Committee on Student Affairs Miss Carbery, Chairman 

Committee on Programs for Graduate Nurses. .Miss Fritz, Chairman 

Committee on Affiliating Students Miss Boyle, Chairman 

Committees on Promotion 

First Year Students Miss Rynbergen, Chairman 

Second Year Students Miss Woodfall, Chairman 

Third Year Students Miss Reid, Chairman 

Committee on Records Miss Lyons, Chairman 

Committee on Principles and Practices 

of Nursing Miss MacLean, Chairman 

Committee on Scholarships Miss Dunbar, Chairman 

Committee on Student and Staff Health. .Mrs. Overholser, Chairman 



Faculty 



Edmund Ezra Day, Ph.D., LL.D., President of the University 

EMERITUS PROFESSORS 

Harriet Frost, R.N., Professor of Public Health Nursing 
May Kennedy, M.A., R.N., Professor of Nursing 

PROFESSORS 

Virginia M. Dunbar, M.A., R.N., Professor of Nursing, Dean of the School of Nursing, 
Director of the Nursing Service. (A.B., Mount Holyoke College, South Hadley, Mass., 
1919; Diploma in Nursing, Johns Hopkins Hospital School of Nursing, Baltimore, 
Md., 1923; M.A., Teachers College, Columbia University, New York, N. Y., 1930. 
Diploma, Bedford College and Florence Nightingale International Foundation, 
London, England, 1936.) 

Bessie A. R. Parker, B.S., R.N., Professor of Nursing, Associate Dean of the School 
of Nursing, Associate Director of the Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Rhode 
Island Hospital Training School for Nurses, Providence, R. I., 1918; B.S., Teachers 
College, Columbia University, New York, N. Y„ 1937.) 

ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS 

Verda F. Hickcox, B.S., R.N., Associate Professor of Obstetric and Gynecological 
Nursing, Head of Obstetric and Gynecological Nursing Service. /Diploma in Nurs- 
ing, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, Chicago, 111., 1916; B.S., Teachers Col- 
lege, Columbia University, New York, N. Y., 1927; Certificate in Midwifery, General 
Lying-in Hospital and School of Midwifery, London, England, 1929.) 

Veronica Lyons, M.A., R.N., Assistant Dean, Associate Professor of Nursing. (Di- 
ploma in Nursing, Johns Hopkins Hospital School of Nursing, Baltimore, Md., 1927; 
B.S., Teachers College, Columbia University, New York, N. Y., 1936; M.A., ibid., 
1947.) 

*Margery T. Overholser, M.A., R.N., Associate Professor of Public Health Nursing, 
Director of Public Health Nursing. (Diploma in Nursing, Wesley Memorial Hospital 
School of Nursing, Chicago, Illinois, 1922; B.S., Teachers College, Columbia Uni- 
versity, New York, N. Y., 1927; M.A., ibid., 1944.) 

Olive M. Reid, A.B., R.N., Associate Professor of Out-Patient Nursing, Head of Out- 
Patient Nursi?ig Service. (A.B., Western College for Women, Oxford, Ohio, 1916; 
Diploma in Nursing, Army School of Nursing, Washington, D. C, 1921.) 

Agnes Schubert, M.S., R.N., Associate Professor of Pediatric Nursing, Head of Pedi- 
atric Nursing Service. (B.S., Northwestern University, Evanston, 111., 1917; Diploma 
in Nursing, Western Reserve University School of Nursing, Cleveland, Ohio, 1926; 
M.S., Teachers College, Columbia University, New York, N. Y., 1932.) 



* Leave of Absence for Study, September 1, 1948 to August 30, 1949 

34 



FACULTY 35 

ASSISTANT PROFESSORS 

Muriel Carberv, A.B., R.N., Assistant Professor of Surgical Nursing, Head of Nurs- 
ing Service in the General Operating Rooms. (A.B., Hunter College, New York, N. Y., 
1933; Diploma in Nursing, The New York Hospital School of Nursing, New York, 
N. Y., 1937.) 

Edna Fritz, M.A., R.N., Assistant Professor in Charge of Programs for Graduate 
Nurses and Staff Education. (B.S. in Nursing, Russell Sage College School of Nursing, 
Troy, N. Y., 1940; M.A., Teachers College, Columbia University, New York, N. Y., 
1942.) 

Mary Elizabeth Klein, B.S., R.N., Assistant Professor of Medical and Surgical Nurs- 
ing, Head of Medical and Surgical Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Hahne- 
mann Hospital School of Nursing, Philadelphia, Pa., 1916; B.S., Teachers College, 
Columbia University, New York, N. Y., 1936.) 

Mary T. McDermott, M.A., Assistant Professor of Physical Education; Director, 
Nurses' Residence. (Diploma, Bouve Boston School of Physical Education, Boston, 
Mass., 1916; B.S., New York University, New York, N. Y., 1930; M.A., ibid., 1932.) 

Sarah E. Moore, R.N., Assistant Professor of Nursing; Administrative Assistant, Day 
Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, The New York Hospital School of Nursing, 
New York, N. Y., 1913.) 

*M. Eva Poor, A.B., R.N., Assistant Professor of Nursing, Head of Private Patient 
Nursing Service. (A.B., Tufts College, Medford, Mass., 1930; Diploma in Nursing, 
The New York Hospital School of Nursing, New York, N. Y., 1939.) 

Henderika J. Rynbergen, M.S., Assistant Professor of Sciences. (B.S., Simmons College, 
Boston, Mass., 1922; M.S., Cornell University Medical College, New York, N. Y., 1938.) 

FACULTY INSTRUCTORS 

Frances Lucretia Boyle, B.S., R.N., Instructor in Obstetric Out-Patient Nursing; 
Supervisor, Obstetrical Out-Patient Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Moses 
Taylor Hospital, Scranton, Pa., 1924; B.S., Teachers College, Columbia University, 
New York, N. Y., 1945.) 

Angela Coletti, M.A., R.N., Instructor in Obstetric Nursing; Supervisor, Newborn 
Nurseries. (Diploma in Nursing, St. John's Long Island City Hospital, Long Island 
City, N. Y., 1942; B.S., St. John's University, Brooklyn, N. Y., 1945; M.A., New York 
University, New York, N. Y., 1948.) 

Virginia Daniels, M.A., R.N., Instructor in Surgical Nursing; Supervisor, Surgical 
Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, 
Chicago, 111., 1930; B.S., Teachers College, Columbia University, New York, N. Y., 
1937; M.A., ibid., 1948.) 

Virginia Carolyn Dericks, M.A., R.N., Instructor in Surgical Nursing; Supervisor 
in Surgical Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, St. Joseph Hospital School of 
Nursing, Paterson, New Jersey, 1939; B.S., Teachers College, Columbia University, 
New York, N. Y., 1943; M.A., ibid., 1947.) 

Laura C. Dustan, M.N., R.N., Instructor in Obstetric and Gynecological Nursing; 
Supervisor, Obstetric and Gynecological Nursing Service. (B.S., University of Vermont, 
1940; M.N., Frances Payne Bolton School of Nursing, Western Reserve University, 

* Leave of absence for studv, Fall term 1948. 



36 SCHOOL OF NURSING 

Cleveland, Ohio, 1943; Nurse Midwifery Course, Maternity Center Association, New 
York, N. Y., 1946.) 

Helma Fedder, B.S., R.N., Instructor in Surgical Nursing; Supervisor, Surgical Nurs- 
ing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Washington University School of Nursing, St. 
Louis, Mo., 1933; B.S., University of Chicago, 1942.) 

Sarah M. Ferguson, B.S., R.N., Instructor in Pediatric Nursing; Supervisor, Pedi- 
atric Out-Patient Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Children's Hospital School 
of Nursing, Boston, Mass., 1932; B.S., Teachers College, Columbia University, New 
York, N. Y., 1947.) 

Mrs. Lilian Henderson Ginsberg, B.S., R.N., Instructor in Surgical Nursing; Super- 
visor, Surgical Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Syracuse University School of 
Nursing, Syracuse, N. Y., 1930; B.S., Teachers College, Columbia University, New 
York, N. Y., 1945.) 

Marie C. Goik, B.S., R.N., Instructor in Public Health Nursing and Acting Director 
of Public Health Nursing. (Diploma in Nursing, Cook County Hospital, Chicago, 
Illinois, 1937; B. S., Teachers College, Columbia University, New York, N. Y., 1948). 

Elizabeth Harmon, B.A., R.N., Instructor in Medical and Surgical Nursing, Assistant 
Head of Medical and Surgical Nursing Service. (B.A., College of Wooster, Wooster, 
Ohio, 1928; Diploma in Nursing, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, Chicago, 
111., 1931.) 

Pauline Alice Heymann, M.A., R.N., Instructor in Medical and Surgical Nursing, 
Evening Supervisor, Medical and Surgical Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, 
University of Kansas School of Nursing, Lawrence, Kansas, 1941; B.A., University of 
Kansas, Lawrence, Kansas, 1943; M.A., Teachers College, Columbia University, New 
York, N. Y., 1947.) 

Thirza Hills, B.S., R.N., Instructor in Medical and Surgical Nursing; Evening 
Supervisor, Medical and Surgical Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Presbyterian 
Hospital School of Nursing, Chicago, 111., 1925; B.S., Teachers College, Columbia 
University, New York, N. Y., 1942.) 

Barbara Semple Howell, B.S., R.N., Instructor in Obstetric and Gynecological 
Nursing; Supervisor, Obstetric and Gynecological Nursing Service. (Diploma in 
Nursing, Ohio Valley General Hospital, Wheeling, W. Va., 1935; B.S., in Nursing 
Education, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pa., 1945.) 

Doris Jean Iba, B.S., Instructor in Sciences. (B.S., University of Missouri, Columbia, 
Mo., 1944.) 

Margaret Joinville, B.S., R.N., Instructor in Psychiatric Nursing; Acting Head, 
Psychiatric Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Army School of Nursing, Wash- 
ington, D. C, 1929; B.S., Teachers College, Columbia University, New York, N. Y., 
1941.) 

Dorothy E. Jump, B.S., R.N., Instructor in Obstetric and Gynecological Nursing; 
Supervisor, Delivery Room Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Henry Ford Hos- 
pital, Detroit, Mich., 1942; B.S., Wayne University, Detroit, Mich., 1943.) 

*H. Rosalind MacLean, M.A., R.N., Instructor in Nursing Arts. (B.A., Adelphi 
College,. Garden City, L. L, N. Y., 1932; M.A., Columbia University, New York, N. Y., 
1933; Diploma in Nursing, The New York Hospital School of Nursing, New York, 
N. Y., 1937.) 



* Leave of Absence for Study, Academic Year, 1948-1949 



FACULTY 37 

CAROLINE E. M adore, B.S., R.N., Instructor in Nursing Arts. (Diploma in Nursing, 
Peter Bent Brigham Hospital School of Nursing, Boston, Mass., 1942; B.S., Boston 
University, Boston, Mass., 1945.) 

Audrey McGluskey, M.A., R.N., Instructor in Medical Nursing; Supervisor, Medical 
Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Cornell University-New York Hospital School 
of Nursing, New York, N. Y., 1911; B.S., in Nursing, Temple University, Philadelphia, 
Pa., 1914; M.A., Teachers College, Columbia University, New York, N. Y., 1948.) 

Doroiiiv McMullan, B.S., R.N., Instructor in Medical and Surgical Nursing; Super- 
visor, Out-Patient Medical and Surgical Nursing. (Diploma in Nursing, The New- 
York Hospital School of Nursing, New York, N. Y., 1935; B.S., New York University, 
New York, N. Y., 1948.) 

Kathleen Newton, B.S., R.N., Instructor in Medical Nursing; Supervisor, Medical 
Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, University of Washington, Seattle, Wash., 
1936; B.S., ibid., 1934.) 

Edith Nielsen, B.S., R.N., Instructor in Nursing; Supervisor, Private Patient Nurs- 
ing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, Chicago, 
111., 1931; B.S., Teachers College, Columbia University, New York, N. Y., 1947.) 

Sue Sabia, B.S., R.N., Instructor in Medical and Surgical Nursing; Assistant Evening 
Supervisor, Medical and Surgical Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Elizabeth 
General Hospital School of Nursing, Elizabeth, N. J., 1935; B.S., Teachers College, 
Columbia University, New York, N. Y., 1943.) 

Mary H. Sw'anwick, B.S., R.N., Instructor in Surgical Nursing; Supervisor, Surgical 
Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, St. Vincent's Hospital School of Nursing, New- 
York, N. Y., 1941; B.S., St. John's University, Brooklyn, N. Y., 1945.) 

Florence Stokes, M.A., R.N., Instructor in Pediatric Nursing; Supervisor, Pediatric 
Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, St. Luke's Hospital School of Nursing, New 
York, N. Y., 1941; B.S., Teachers College, Columbia University, New York, N. Y., 
1915; M.A., ibid., 1948.) 

Jeannette Walters, B.S., R.N., Instructor in Obstetric and Gynecological Nurs- 
ing; Assistant Department Head, Obstetric and Gynecological Nursing Service. 
(Diploma in Nursing, Temple University Hospital School of Nursing, Philadelphia, 
Pa., 1923; B.S., New York University, New York, N. Y., 1944.) 

Ruth Woodfall, B.S., R.N., Instructor in Pediatric Nursing; Supervisor, Pediatric 
Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Children's Hospital School of Nursing, Boston, 
Mass., 1932; B.S., Teachers College, Columbia University, New York, N. Y., 1947.) 

Hannah Ziering, M.A., R.N., Instructor in Psychiatric Nursing; Administrative 
Assistant, Psychiatric Nursing Service. (B.S., Long Island University, Brooklyn, N. Y., 
1940; Diploma and B.S. in Nursing, Cornell University-New York Hospital School 
of Nursing, New York, N. Y., 1943; M.A., Teachers College, Columbia University, New 
York, N. Y., 1945.) 

FROM THE FACULTY OF 
CORNELL UNIVERSITY MEDICAL COLLEGE 

Joseph C. Hinsey, Ph.D Dean and Professor of Anatomy 

David P. Barr, M.D Professor of Medicine 

McKeen Cattell, M.D Professor of Pharmacology 



38 SCHOOL OF NURSING 

Oskar Diethelm, M.D Professor of Psychiatry 

Eugene F. DuBois, M.D Professor of Physiology 

Vincent Du, Vigneaud, Ph.D Professor of Biochemistry 

Frank Glenn, M.D Professor of Surgery 

John G. Kidd, M.D Professor of Pathology 

Samuel Z. Levine, M.D Professor of Pediatrics 

James M. Neill, Ph.D Professor of Bacteriology and Immunology 

Wilson G. Smillie, M.D Professor of Public Health and Preventive Medicine 

Harold L. Temple, M.D Professor of Radiology 

(To be appointed) Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology 

Edward J. Hehre, M.D Assistant Professor of Bacteriology and Immunology 

Charles Berry, M.D Assistant Professor of Anatomy 

William A. Geohegan, M.D Assistant Professor of Anatomy 

Helena Gilder, M.D Research Associate in Biochemistry 

Johanna Lee, Ph.D Research Associate in Biochemistry 

Charles H. Richards, M.D Instructor in Physiology 



Associated with the Faculty 

ASSISTANTS IN INSTRUCTION 

Helen Camp Belcher, A.B., R.N., Assistant in Medical and Surgical Nursing; Assist- 
ant Nigfit Supervisor, Medical and Surgical Nursing Service. (A.B., Mount Holyoke 
College, South Hadley, Mass., 1942; Diploma in Nursing, Massachusetts General Hos- 
pital School of Nursing, 1944.) 

Ruth Marian Brockman, R.N., Assistayit in Medical and Surgical Nursing; Night 
Supervisor, Medical and Surgical Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, The New 
York Hospital School of Nursing, 1931.) 

Thelma Inez Cobb, R. N., Assistant in Obstetric and Gynecological Nursing; Night 
Supervisor, Obstetric and Gynecological Nursing Service. (Teaching Certificate, Uni- 
versity of Virginia, 1922; Diploma in Nursing, New Jersey State Hospital, Grey- 
stone Park, N. J., 1933.) 

Alice Marie DoxDero, R.N., Assistant in Pediatric Nursing; Supervisor, Pediatric 
Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Long Island College Hospital, Brooklyn, 
N. Y., 1941.) 

Leone Marjorie DeLelys, B.S., R.N., Assistant in Operating Room Nursing; Assist- 
ant Supervisor, General Operating Rooms. (Diploma in Nursing, Strong Memorial 
Hospital, Rochester, N. Y., 1937; B.S., Teachers College, Columbia University, New 
York, N. Y., 1944.) 

Rita Malloch Genner, R.N., Assistant in Nursing; Supervisor, Nurses' Health Serv- 
ice. (Diploma in Nursing, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, New York, N. Y., 
1920.) 

Inez Gnau, R.N., Assistant in Psychiatric Nursing; Night Supervisor, Psychiatric 
Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Jefferson Hospital School of Nursing, Phila- 
delphia, Pa., 1935.) 

Mary E. Hunter, B.S., R.N., Assistant in Nursing Arts. (Diploma and B.S. in Nurs- 
ing, Cornell University-New York Hospital School of Nursing, New York, N. Y., 
1946.) 

Eileen Kiernan, R.N., Assistant in Pediatric Nursing; Evening Supervisor, Pediatric 
Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Cornell University-New York Hospital School 
of Nursing, 1944.) 

Celerina Trinos Miguel, M.A., R. N., Assistant in Obstetric Nursing, Night Super- 
visor, Obstetric Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Mary J. Hospital, Manila, 
P. I.; B.S., Teachers College, Columbia University, 1933; M.A., ibid., 1934.) 

Helen V. Miller, R.N., Assistant in Nursing; Administrative Assistant, Nursing 
Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Long Island College Hospital School of Nursing, 
Brooklyn, N. Y., 1932.) 

Helen Ratushny, B.S., R.N., Assistant in Psycfiiatric Nursing; Supervisor, Psychia- 
tric Nursing Service. (Diploma and B.S. in Nursing, Cornell University-New York 
Hospital School of Nursing, New York, N. Y., 1944.) 

39 



40 



SCHOOL OF NURSING 



Mary L. Sillcox, R. N., Assistant in Obstetric and Gynecological Nursing; Evening 
Supervisor, Obstetric and Gynecological Nursing Service. /Diploma in Nursing, Fax- 
ton Hospital School of Nursing, Utica, N. Y., 1916). 

Elizabeth Mary Simmons, B.S., R.N., Assistant in Pediatric Nursing; Night Super- 
visor, Pediatric Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Stamford Hospital School of 
Nursing, Stamford, Conn., 1934; B.S., New York University, N. Y., 1947.) 

Mildred M. Steigerwalt, B.S., R.N., Assistant in Pediatric Nursing; Supervisor, 
Pediatric Nursing Service. (Diploma and B.S. in Nursing, Cornell University-New 
York Hospital School of Nursing, New York, N. Y., 1944.) 

Mary Whitaker, R.N., Assistant in Psychiatric Nursing; Night Supervisor, Psychia- 
tric Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, McLean Hospital School of Nursing, 
Waverly, Mass., 1933.) 

LECTURERS 

W. R. Redden, M.D Emergency Nursing 

American Red Cross, New York Chapter 

Faculty of the Cornell Medical College, from all Clinical Departments 



STAFF OF THE NEW YORK HOSPITAL 

Laurence G. Payson Acting Director 

ADMINISTRATIVE AND SUPERVISORY NURSING STAFF 

Charlotte S. Argabrite, R.N Night Administrative Assistant 

Vanda Summers, R.N Evening Administrative Assistant 

Doris F. Bresnahan, B.S.. .Day Administrative Assistant in Charge of 

Supplementary Staff 

Vera Beach, R.N Supervisor, Private Patients Service 

Inez Mullen, B.S Evening Supervisor, Private Patients Service 

Margaret DeWitt, R.N Assistant Supervisor, Gynecological Operating Rooms 

Lucy Hickey, R.N Assistant Supervisor, General Operating Rooms 



Capuano, Mary 
Collins, Ona, B.S. 
Cullington, Barbara 
Curtis, Jane, B.S. 
Dieterle, Doris 



HEAD NURSES 

MEDICINE AND SURGERY 

Dotter, Pamela, B.S. 
Ewen, Margaret, B.S. 
Lubowska, Nina 
McKeown, Elizabeth 
McNeer, Mary, A.B. 



Monroe, Alice, B.A., B.S. 
Nelson, Jeanne 
Stratton, Edna 
Zorn, Kathleen 



B.S. 



Biltz, Christine 
Derr, Barbara 
Farmer, Rosemary 
Husted, Salome Y. 



OPERATING ROOM 

Karstetter, Cora 
Milone, Marion 
Myers, Helen 
Pelton, Ella 



Philbrick, Olive 
Rau, Rozalia, B.A. 
Skoog, Alverna 
Ward, Alberta 




Each student has a room of her own in which to entertain or relax. 




A student begins a day of home visits as part of her experience in Public 

Health Nursing. 




Students and prospective mothers discuss the needs of newborn infants. 



ASSOCIATED WITH THE FACULTY 



41 



OBSTETRICS AND GYNECOLOGY 



Bott, Alma 
Calder, Elizabeth 
Coluell, Anne 
Conner, Agnes 
Furev, Sylvania, B.S. 



Hawtin, Clara 
Jackson, Dorothy 
Knox, Violet 
Matus, Veronica 
Philla, Dorothv 



Silverbush, Frances 
Skinner, Margaret, B.A. 
Storv, Mildred, B.S. 
Young, Kathleen 



Armstrong, Marion 
Bristle, Louise, B.S. 
Campbell, Marjorie 
Goodman, Gertrude, B.S 
Lundgren, Grace 



PAYNE WHITNEY CLINIC (Psychiatry) 

Ranson, Dorothy 
Weaver, Jessie 



McKee, Beatrice 
Mellady, Elizabeth, B.S. 
Morrison, Esther 
Nelson, Marjorie 
Porter, Phyllis, B.S. 



Wilson, Arlene 
Ferguson, Phyllis 



OUT-PATIENT DEPARTMENT 



Clark, Evelyn 
Geiger, Elizabeth 
Hutchins, Martha, 

A.B., M.S. 
Kinstler, Shirley 
Lambert, Lucille 



Lebendiger, Genevieve, 

B.S. 
Liddle, Evelyn 
Long, Ilene 
Marcussen, Margerv 
Meachard, Delia 



Nussbaumer, Elsa 
Orlopp, Florence 
Riggs, Elise, A.B. 
Rouchleau, Margaret 
Short, Norma 



Cantrell, Lois, B.S. 
Hughes, Anne, B.S. 
Kintner, Jane 



PRIVATE PATIENTS 

Learn, Ruth 
Meverowitz, Claire, B.S. 
Nielsen, Ruth 



Rasely, Elizabeth 
Shanahan, Frances, B.S. 
Smith, Helen 



Fouler, Jessie, B.S. 
Johnson, Nancy 



PEDIATRICS 



Mott, Marjorie 



Zemlock. Margaret, B.S. 



NUTRITION DEPARTMENT 



Louise Stephenson, B.S., M.S., Director 
Meredith Jones, B.S. Virginia Pearson, B.S. 

Catherine Kellerman, B.S. Elizabeth Richmond, B.S. 

Susan Paige, B.S. Jeanne Tillotson, B.S. 

(TWO TO BE APPOINTED) 



PAYNE WHITNEY CLINIC 

Mildred Spargo Director, Occupational Therapy Department 

Grace Brindle Director, Physical Therapy Department 

SOCIAL SERVICE DEPARTMENTS 

Theodate H. Soule, M.A Director, Main Hospital 

Mrs. Virginia T. Kinzel Director, Woman's Clinic 

Mrs. Melly Simon Director, Payne Whitney Clinic 



42 SCHOOL OF NURSING 

INSTITUTE OF CHILD DEVELOPMENT 

Mrs. Eleanor Reich Head Teacher, Nursery School 

Mrs. Eleanor Gardner Nursery School 

Mrs. Jane Varian Nursery School 

Miss Evelyn Wolff Occupational Therapy 

STAFF OF THE VISITING NURSE SERVICE 

Marion Randall, B.S., R.N Director 

Eleanor Mole, B.S., R.N Director of Education 

Lucille Notter, M.A., R.N Assistant Director of Education 

and Staff 

STAFF OF COMMUNITY SERVICE SOCIETY 

Alta E. Dines, M.A., L.H.D.,R.N Director, Department of Educational Nursing 

and Staff 

ALUMNAE ASSOCIATION 

Edna Stratton, R.N President 

COMMITTEE FOR SCHOLARSHIPS 

Mrs. Norvelle C. LaMar Chairman 



STUDENTS 



43 



STUDENTS NOW IN THE SCHOOL* 

Xame Class Home College or University 

Affleck, May '50 Larchmont, N. Y. Wheaton College 

Ansalone, Carla '48 New York, N. Y. Upsala College, Hunter 

College 
Archilla, Carmen '50 Mayaguez, Puerto Rico Polytechnic Institute, San 

German, Puerto Rico' 
Arnot, Adele '50 Cuyahoga Falls, Ohio Cornell University 

Banome, Anna Marie '48 Forest Hills, N. Y. 

Bantley, Charlotte Elaine.. '48 Johnstown, Pa. Gettysburg College 

Bielski, Mary Theresa '49 Philadelphia, Pa. Temple University 

Birnbaum, Bernice '48 New York, N. Y. Brooklyn College 

Boyd, Lois Mae '48 Philadelphia, Pa. Temple University 

Boynton, Nancy Theresa. . .'50 New Rochelle, N. Y. Syracuse University 

Briggs, Phyllis '50 Hampton, Iowa Cornell College 

Brown, Shirley Irene '49 Scranton, Pa. Temple University 

Bucher, Margaret Louisa. . .'48 Leonia, N. J. New Jersey College for 

Women 

Conner, Barbara Ann '50 Saco, Maine Westbrook Junior College 

University of New 
Hampshire 

Conroy, Barbara Ann '50 Rutherford, N. J. New Jersey College for 

Women 

Cook, Victoria Marian '50 Lanham, Md. Ohio Wesleyan Univer- 

sity 

Cowles, Marilyn M '50 Corning, N. Y. Elmira College 

Dauphin, Arlene Kathryn. .'49 Savannah, 111. Frances Shimer Junior 

College 

Detwiler, Barbara Ann '48 Red Lion, Pa. Temple University 

Devine, Doris R '50 Norwich, N. Y. Manhattanville College 

Dirks, Marguerite Joan . . . .'48 Montague, Mass. Blackburn College 

Duncan, Alice E '50 Arlington, Ya. Washington University, 

George Washington 
University 
Duvall, Grace '50 Brooklyn, N. Y. Brooklyn College 

Emerson, Faith G '50 Bridgeton, N. J. Ursinus College 

Epps, Marjorie Wadsworth'49 Chapel Hill, N. C. University of North Caro- 

lina 

Fahys, Kathryn Jackson. . . .'48 Sea Cliff, N. Y. Pratt Institute 

Fox, Julie Miller '48 Rochester, N. Y. Colby Junior College 

Franklin, Shirley Irene '50 Oxford, N. Y. New Jersey College for 

Women 

French, Jean Gilvey '49 Brooklyn, N. Y. Brooklyn College 

Fulton, Adele Louise '48 Ramsey, N.J. Furman University 

Gault, Nancy Cox '50 Brookline, Mass. University of Chicago 

Gelinas, Maxine Olive '48 Baltimore,?Md. University of Maryland 

Goheen, Ruth Martin '50 Pine Plains, N. Y. Cornell University 

Gordon, Doris Jove '48 Forest Hills, N. Y. Elmira College 

Gregory, Ellen Louise '50 Chevy Chase, Md. George Washington Uni- 
versity 

Gurskey, Nancy Ann '50 _jAllentown, Pa. Cedar Crest College 



*Including those graduating in September, 1948,'but not those entering at that time. 



44 



SCHOOL OF NURSING 



Name Class Home 

Hadley, Jeanne '50 Ocean City, N. J. 

Hagan, Majanah Lenora. . .'48 Roanoke, Va. 

Hardy, Gertrude '49 Upper Darby, Pa. 

Harper, Dorothy Eleanor. .'48 Jamaica, N. Y. 

Harwood, Caryl Virginia. .'50 Rutherford, N.J. 

Hastings, Ann Bernice '49 Leonia, N. J. 

Hazeltine, Louise S '49 Trucksville, Pa. 

Holland, Lois Washburn . . '48 Jamaica, N. Y. 

Houston, Jean M '50 Shrewsbury, Mass. 

Hrouda, Margery E '50 Peekskill, N. Y. 

Jennings, Joan '48 Pelham, N. Y. 

Johnson, Dorothy Ruth '50 Roselle Park, N. J. 

Jordan, Patricia Jean '49 Fanwood, N.J. 

Jurusik, Josephine Marie. . .'48 Elmira Heights, N. Y. 

Kelly, Mary Grace '50 Elmira, N. Y. 

Kemper, Ruth '50 Washington, D. C. 

Kindig, Marion Kobbes. . . .'48 Hunlock Creek, Pa. 

Knuth, Virginia Mary '49 Elmira, N. Y. 

Kokos, Anastassia '48 Woodbury, N. J. 

Kurihara, Marie '50 Ordsi, Cal. 

Lehrbach, Mary Therese. .'49 Rochester, N. Y. 

Lesh, Elizabeth May '49 Wind Gap, Pa. 

Lloyd, Louisa Barton '48 Roxbury, Va. 

MacKellar, Jean F '49 River Edge, N. J. 

McCabe, Ellin Jeanne '50 Harrison, N. Y. 

McKinley, Barbara Anne. .'50 Cos Cob, Conn. 

McLellan, Eileen '50 Pelham, N. Y. 

Morrison, Marjorie Ann. . .'48 Honesdale, Pa. 

Nolt, Edith '50 Landisville, Pa. 

Noone, Eileen '50 Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Oren, Adele Toby '48 Catskill, N. Y. 

Packer, Phyllis '49 Interlaken, N. Y. 

Palmer, Frances Williams. .'48 Hilton, N. Y. 

Palmer, Margaret M '50 Tully, N. Y. 

Pederson, Evelyn Marie. . . .'48 Modesto, Cal. 

Peterson, Constance L '48 New York, N. Y. 

Peterson, Jane '49 Wethersfield, Conn. 

Poppleton, Barbara '48 Elmira, N. Y. 

Promann, Ursula Marianne '49 Weehauken, N. J. 



College or University 

Cornell University 

Mars Hill Junior College 

New Jersey College for 
Women 

Adelphi College (B.A.,43) 

Rutgers University 

New Jersey College for 
Women 

Bucknell Junior College, 
Bucknell University 
(B.A., '46) 

Adelphi College 

Cornell University 

Concordia Collegiate In- 
stitute 

Elmira College 
Cornell University 
Elmira College 

Elmira College 
University of Cincinnati 
Temple University 
Elmira College 
New Jersey College for 

Women 
University of California 

Cornell University 
Temple University 
Sweet Briar College, 

William and Mary 

College 

Cornell University 
Green Mountain College 
University of Connecti- 
cut 
Mount Holyoke College 



Temple University 
St. John's University 

Cornell University, Uni- 
versity of Miami 

Cornell University 
Cornell University 
Cornell University 
Modesto Junior College 
Hunter College 
Wheaton College 
Elmira College 
Concordia Collegiate In- 
stitute 



Quedens, Margaret Helen . . '48 New York, N. Y. 



Barnard College 



STUDENTS 

Name Class Home 

Reimer, Margaret Ann. . . .'48 Mamaroneck, N. Y. 

Reuter, Margaret '50 Fort Monroe, Va. 

Rogers, Anne Bradley '49 Cleveland, Ohio 

Rosen, Helen Betty. .' '48 Hazleton, Pa. 

Russo, Mario Antoinette. . .'49 Flushing, N. Y 

Saltzman, Miriam '50 New York, N. Y. 

Sarno, Phyllis '50 New York, N. Y. 

Scanlon, Jeanne Marie '48 New York, N. Y. 

Schlimbaum, Prudence A . . '49 Bay Shore, N. Y. 

Schmidt, Joan Wanda '49 Astoria, N. Y. 

Sheret, Jennie Barbara '48 Ogdensburg, N. Y. 

Shore, Ann Teadwell '49 Hempstead, N. Y. 

Sieminski, Irene Marie '48 Kingston, Pa. 

Silver, Cecily '49 Middle Village, N. Y. 

Simpson, Gloria Ruth '49 Ambler, Pa. 

Stenvall, Audrey '49 Patchogue, N. Y. 

Sterba, Helen Anna '48 New York, N. Y. 

Stiglitz, Patricia Mary '48 Plainfield, N. J. 

Stringe, Mary Ann '48 Nashville, Tenn. 

Strouse, Nancy Jane '50 Irvington, N. J. 

Sturgis, Lillian Eloise '50 Ocala, Fla. 

Swann, Jean '50 Elmira, N. Y. 

Swanwick, Joan E '50 Devon, Conn. 

Tagliabue, Alma E '50 Bayville, N. Y. 

Tease, Jean Wilson '50 Rushland, Pa. 

Teufel, Audrey May '48 Milton, Pa. 

Thompson, Arlene Joyce. .'48 Rochester, N. Y. 

Tonks, Mary Lewellen . . .'50 Schenectady, N. Y. 

Towne, Joyce Ann '50 Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Trudeau, Martha May '48 Middlebury, Yt. 

YanArsdale, Martha L. ...'49 East Orange, N.J. 

VanZandt, Elizabeth '48 Blawenburg, N. J. 

von Thurn, Louise '50 Belmont, Mass. 

Wiedman, Janet Elizabeth. .'49 Kenmore, N. Y. 

Yelverton, Rebecca '50 Raleigh, N. C. 

Zasinas, Virginia A '48 Easton, Pa. 

Ziegler, Lillian Louise '48 Lynbrook, N. Y. 



45 



College or University 



Madison College 
Briarcliff Junior College 
University of Pennsyl- 
vania 
.St. Mary of the Springs 

Queens College 

University of Missouri 

College of Mt. St. Vincent 

Elmira College 

Hunter College 

Tusculum College 

Hood College 

Bucknell Junior College 

Queens College 

Pennsylvania State Col- 
lege 

Concordia Collegiate In- 
stitute 

New York University 

Madison College 

George Peabody College 
for Teachers 

Centenary Junior College 

Duke University 

Augustana College 

Ohio University 

Rensselaer Polytechnic 

Institute 
Temple University 

Cornell University 
Antioch College 
Brooklyn College 



Hood College 

New Jersey College for 

Women 
Middlebury College 

University of Colorado, 
University of Buffalo 

Meredith College 

Moravian College for 

Women 
Svracuse University 
(B.F.A., '40) 



FORM OF BEQUEST 

Gifts or bequests to the School of Nursing may be made 
either to the University or the Hospital with a request 
that they be used for the School of Nursing, as follows: 

"I give and bequeath to Cornell University (or 
"I give and bequeath to the Society of the New 

York Hospital") the sum of $ 

for use in connection with the Cornell Uni- 
versity-New York Hospital School of Nursing." 

If it is desired that a gift shall be used in whole or in part 
for any specific purpose in the program of the School of 
Nursing such use may be specified. 



It is desirable that prospective applicants enroll with the school as 
early as possible so that they may receive assistance in planning their 
programs in high school and college to gain the best possible back- 
ground preparatory to entering the school of nursing. 

Write to: Miss Virginia M. Dunbar, Dean 

Cornell University-New York Hospital School of Nursing 
525 East 68th Street, New York 21, N. Y. 



tf 



REQUEST FOR INFORMATION OR APPLICATION 

Please place my name on your mailing list so that I may receive information which 
will help me in planning my high school and college preparation for nursing school 
entrance. 

Name Date 

Address 



Date of Birth 

High School: name and location, 



Date diploma received or expected, 
College: name and location 



Date on which I expect to have completed at least two years of college 

19 

Please send me an application blank (check if desired) 

(see page 11.) 






Index 



Absences, 19 

Accreditation of the school, 14 

Activities, 19; Nurses Residence, 19; 
Alumnae Association, 21; recreation, 
19; school government, 20; counsel- 
ing services, 21 

Administrative and teaching personnel, 
32-40 

Admission, requirements for, 10; appli- 
cation for, 11; credit requirements, 
11; educational requisites, 10 

Advanced standing, 13 

Aim of School of Nursing, 4 

Alumnae Association, 21, 42; Irene Sut- 
liffe Fund, 17 

American Red Cross, 40 

Anatomy, 23, 26 

Application for admission, 11, 12 

Assistant Professors, 35 

Assistants in Administration, 33 

Assistants in Instruction, 39, 40 

Associate Professors, 34 

Associated with faculty, 39-42 

Bequest, form of, 46 

Biological and physical sciences, 26 

Calendar, 3 

Career opportunities in nursing, 4 

Chemistry, 23, 26 

Clinical Pathology, 23, 26 

Clinics, 7 

Committee for Scholarships, 16, 42 

Communicable diseases, 23, 29 

Community Service Society, 42 

Contents, 2 

Cornell University, 5, 6; degree, 13; 

Medical College faculty, 37, 38 
Council of the School, 32 
Courses, description of, 26-31 
Credit requirements, 11 
Curriculum, 22; first year, 22; second 

vear, 23; third vear. 24 



Day, Edmund Ezra, president, Cornell 

University, 32, 33, 34 
Degree, 13 

Description of courses, 26-31 
Development of Behavior in Children, 

24, 30, 31 
Diet Therapy, 23, 28, 29 
Diploma, 13 
Dunbar, Virginia M., dean, School of 

Nursing, 32, 33, 34 

Educational requisites, 10, 11 
Emergency nursing, 25, 28 
Emeritus professors, 34 

Facilities for instruction, 7-9 
Faculty, 34-38; associated with, 39-42; 

committees of, 33 
Faculty Instructors, 35-37 
Family and community health, 25, 27 
Fees and expenses, 15; method of pay- 
ment, 15, 16 
Financial aid, 16, 17 

Graduation, 12; advanced standing, 13; 
degree and diploma, 13 

Head nurses, 40, 41 
Health service, 18 
History, 5, 6 
History of Nursing, 24, 27 

Institute of Child Development, 42 

Jackson, William Harding, president, 

Board of Governors, 32 
Joint Administrative Board, 32 

Libraries, 7 

Loan funds, 16, 17 

Maintenance, 16 
Medical Nursing, 23, 24, 25, 29 
Medical and Surgical Nursing Princi- 
ples. 25. 29 



47 



48 



INDEX 



Medicine, 23, 29 
Microbiology, 23, 26 

New York Hospital, 5, 6; supervisors, 

40; head nurses, 40, 41 
Nurses Residence, 7, 18, 19 
Nursing and allied arts, general, 28 
Nursing Arts I, 23, 28 
Nursing Arts, II, 23, 28 
Nutrition, 28, 29; department of, 41; 

Nutrition and Cookery, 23, 28 

Obstetric and Gynecological Nursing, 
24, 30; obstetrics and gynecology, 24, 
30 

Officers of Administration, 32, 33 

Operative technique, 24, 30 

Orientation, 23, 28 

Out-Patient Departments, 8, 25, 27 

Payne Whitney Clinic, 8, 41 

Pediatric Nursing, 24, 30 

Pediatrics, 24, 30 

Personality Growth and Development, 

23, 26 
Pharmacology I, 23, 28 
Pharmacology II, 23, 28 
Physical education, 23, 24, 25, 27 
Physiology, 23, 26 
Private Patient Nursing, 25 29 
Professional Adjustments I, 23, 27 
Professional Adjustments II, 25, 27 



Professors, 34 

Promotion and graduation, 12, 13; see 

Advanced standing, Degree, Diploma 
Psychiatric Nursing, 25, 31; special 

therapeutics in, 25, 31 
Psychiatry, 25, 31 
Public Health, 8, 25, 27 

Recreation, 19, 20 

Scholarships, 16, 17 

School government, 20 

School of Nursing, administrative of- 
ficers, 32, 33; assistants in adminis- 
tration, 33; faculty committees, 33 

School of Nursing Council, 32 

Social and Health Aspects of Nursing, 
23,26 

Social sciences, 26 

Social service departments, 41 

State registration, 14 

Students now in school, 43-45 

Supervisors, 40 

Surgery, 23, 29 

Surgical Nursing, 23, 25, 29, 30 

Tuition, 15 

Uniforms, 15 

Vacations and absences, 19 

Visiting Nurse Service of New York, 42 



^0 



CORNELL UNIVERSITY 
OFFICIAL PUBLICATION 



JULY 29, 1949 



Cornell University— New York Hospital 

School of Nursing 




ANNOUNCEMENT FOR 
1949-1950 SESSIONS 



Term Dates 1949-1950 

Oct. 3, 1949 -Jan. 22, 1950 

Jan. 23, 1950 -May 14, 1950 

May 15, 1950 -Oct. 1, 1950 

Oct. 2, 1950 -Jan. 21, 1951 



LOCATION OF THE SCHOOL OF NURSING 

The School of Nursing is located on the extreme east side of 
New York. It is part of The New York Hospital-Cornell Medical 
Center, which extends from 68th Street to 71st Street and from 
York Avenue to the East River. 

The Dean's office is reached most easily through the main 
entrance of the Hospital on East 68th Street (east of York Ave- 
nue). The Nurses Residence is at the corner of York Avenue and 
70th Street. 

The 65th Street crosstown bus M-7, east-bound, runs to the 
Medical Center. 



CORNELL UNIVERSITY OFFICIAL PUBLICATION 

Published by Cornell University at Ithaca, New York, every two 
weeks throughout the year. Volume 41, July 29, 1949, Number 3. 
Entered as second-class matter, December 14, 1916, at the post 
office at Ithaca, New York, under the act of August 24, 1912. 



CORNELL UNIVERSITY 
OFFICIAL PUBLICATION 

ITHACA, NEW YORK 

Cornell University- New York Hospital 

School of Nursing 

1949-1950 

525 EAST 68TH STREET: NEW YORK 21, N. Y. 



Contents 



Calendar * 3 

Career Opportunities in Nursing 4 

Aim of the School 5 

History 5 

Facilities for Instruction 7 

Requirements for Admission and Graduation 10 

Accreditation 14 

State Registration 14 

Fees and Expenses 15 

Scholarships 16 

Health Service 17 

Vacations and Absences 18 

Activities 19 

Curriculum 21 

Description of Courses 25 

Administration 32 

Faculty 34 

Associated with the Faculty 38 

Students in the School 42 

Form of Bequest 45 

Index 47 

(Picture Credits: Ben Greenhaus) 



Calendar 



1949 

Sept. 29 Thursday Commencement 

Oct. 1 Saturday Registration of freshmen students 

Oct. 12 Wednesday Holiday (except for freshmen): Columbus Day 

Nov. 24 Thursday Holiday: Thanksgiving Day 

Dec. 24 Saturday Christmas recess for freshmen students begins 

Dec. 26 Monday Holiday: Christmas Day 



Jan. 2 Monday 



Feb. 


13 Monday 


Feb. 


22 Wednesday 


May 


30 Tuesday 


July 


4 Tuesday 


Sept. 


4 Monday 


Sept. 


26 Tuesday 


Sept. 


30 Saturday 


Oct. 


12 Thursday 


Nov. 


23 Thursday 


Dec. 


23 Saturday 


Dec. 


25 Monday 



1950 

Holiday: New Year's Day 

Last day of Christmas recess for freshmen 
Holiday: Lincoln's Birthday 
Holiday: Washington's Birthday 
Holiday: Memorial Day 
Holiday: Independence Day 
Holiday: Labor Day 
Commencement 

Registration of freshmen students 
Holiday (except for freshmen students): 

Columbus Day 
Holiday: Thanksgiving Day 
Christmas recess for freshmen students begins 
Holiday: Christmas Day 

1951 



Jan. 1 Monday 



Holiday: New Year's Day 

Last day of Christmas recess for freshmen 
Feb. 12 Monday Holiday: Lincoln's Birthday 
Feb. 22 Thursday Holiday: Washington's Birthday 
May 30 Wednesday Holiday: Memorial Day 
July 4 Wednesday Holiday: Independence Day 



Career Opportunities in Nursing 



Nursing is one of the vital health services of the world. There are 
now more nurses actively engaged in the practice of their profession 
than ever before, but there is also a greater-than-ever demand for them, 
because of the increasing diversity of nursing activities. This is a re- 
flection of the growing desire on the part of the public, not only for 
care during illness, but also for the information and the services which 
will help them keep well. 

Career opportunities are many and varied. The scope of activity of 
the modern graduate nurse is limited only by her preparation, abilities 
and interests. Her services may influence the welfare of a single patient, 
a community, or a nation. 

The well-educated, well-prepared young woman faces a broad chal- 
lenge. Schools, industry, local and national health agencies are seeking 
her assistance. Old hospitals are expanding and new ones are being 
built, with patient registrations increasing daily. The United States 
Public Health Service is reaching out to more and more people; Con- 
gress yearly enacts legislation making available additional health facil- 
ities to new groups of citizens. Visiting nurse services are multiplying. 
There can be no doubt that our nation is awake to the fact that the 
health of the people is one of its most important resources. 

Like other practitioners in the health services, the professional nurse 
often prepares herself as a specialist in one of the clinical fields such 
as psychiatry, pediatrics, or obstetrics. With increasing experience and 
preparation she may wish to undertake administrative or teaching re- 
sponsibilities. 

Modern therapeutic procedures have become increasingly complex 
and there is constantly greater understanding of the inter-relationship 
between the individual's physical health and his social and psychologi- 
cal well-being. These facts make it necessary for the effective nurse to 
be a person who is professionally prepared in the broadest sense of the 
word. She must possess manual dexterity and skill and must have an 
understanding of human behavior and of the world in which we live. 

If nurses are to accept the responsibilities which the health needs of 
the nation and of the world are placing upon them, the foundation for 
their practice must be laid in a sound general and professional edu- 
cation. 



The Aim of the School of Nursing 



It is the aim of this School of Nursing to offer the carefully selected 
student preparation which will qualify her for professional practice in 
first-level positions in any branch of nursing, and at the same time to 
guide her development as an individual and a citizen. 



History 



This School of Nursing was one of the first to be founded in the 
United States; it is seventy-two years old. As early as 1799, Dr. Valentine 
Seaman, a scholar and prominent physician, organized a series of lec- 
tures for nurses combined with a course of practical instruction on the 
wards. Although the theoretical content was meager and the practical 
instruction not systematically planned, these classes focused attention 
on the fact that women who had some preparation for their work gave 
better care to patients than those without instruction. Each year the 
program was amplified and in 1877 a formal training school for 
nurses was established "to consist of one teacher and 24 pupils." 

GROWTH OF THE NEW YORK HOSPITAL 

The school was for many years an integral part of The New York Hos- 
pital, the second oldest hospital in America maintained by private en- 
dowment. George the Third of England granted the Hospital its 
charter of incorporation on June 13, 1771, under the title of The Society 
of the Hospital in the City of New York in America. This title was 
changed in 1810 to the present one of The Society of the New York 
Hospital. While its roots extend far into the past, the Hospital has 
consistently been sensitive and responsive to the changing needs of the 
community and to the progress of science. One evidence of this has 
been the gradual increase in the functions and size of the institution, 
which has necessitated expansion and re-location to correspond with 
the growth of the city and with the increasing scope of knowledge 
related to health. The present site and buildings are the third it has 
occupied. 



6 SCHOOL OF NURSING 

SCHOOL BECOMES PART OF CORNELL UNIVERSITY 

The program and organization of the School of Nursing has grown 
and changed to keep pace with the health needs of society. The first 
course was eighteen months in length. After thirteen years this was in- 
creased to twenty-four months and in 1896 to three years. It was fitting 
that in 1942, on the 65th anniversary of the founding of the school, it 
should have become a part of Cornell University, thus making available 
the resources of two great institutions, each of which has a long history 
and a notable record of achievement in the fields of education and 
public welfare. 

Cornell University received its first endowment from the Federal 
Government's Educational Land Grant in 1862. The appropriation 
under the Morrill Act was to endow a college "where the leading object 
shall be ... to teach such branches of learning as are related to agri- 
culture and the mechanical arts." This was the beginning of a re- 
markable system of higher education. However, it received its greatest 
impetus through the vision and generosity of Ezra Cornell, who, under 
the influence of Andrew D. White, his colleague and later the first 
president, determined the form of the new University. In 1864, an 
agreement was reached with the legislature of New York State which 
resulted in the founding of "a University of a new type ... an insti- 
tution where any person can find instruction in any study." This com- 
bination of federal, state and private interests and resources is unique. 
It gives strength to the organization, broadens the aims and the policies 
of the University, and extends the influence of its educational ideals. 

One field of service after another has found preparation for its 
workers within this great University. In June, 1927, an association be- 
tween the Cornell University Medical College and The New York 
Hospital was completed, cementing the relationship between the two 
and resulting in 1932 in their joint occupancy of the newly-constructed 
buildings of The New York Hospital-Cornell Medical Center on the 
East River between 68th and 71st Streets. Preparation for nursing was 
first brought under the auspices of the University in July, 1942, when, 
by agreement between the Trustees of the University and the Gover- 
nors of The New York Hospital, the School of Nursing, long con- 
ducted by The Society of the New York Hospital, was made a school 
in the University. 



Facilities for Instruction 



Unusual facilities for learning are available to students in the 
nursing school. These include class and conference rooms, libraries, 
laboratories and instructors' offices. Some of these are in a teaching 
unit on the second floor of the Nurses Residence, while others are pro- 
vided in the Hospital and in the Cornell University Medical College. 

The students' observation and practice include activities in all the 
clinical departments of the Hospital and in the various community 
agencies of the city. 

LIBRARIES 

The library of the school contains a wide selection of periodicals on 
nursing and related fields, including complete sets of important medical 
and nursing periodicals in bound volumes. It is under the direction of 
a committee of the faculty. The facilities of the library of the medical 
college are readily accessible and supplement those of the nursing 
school in such a way as to make available unusual resources to both 
the students and faculty of the school. A librarian is in attendance in 
both libraries. The open-shelf system prevails throughout, thereby 
permitting free access to all books. Additional small libraries are ad- 
jacent to the nursing conference rooms on the Hospital floors in all 
departments. Through the New York Public Library, valuable sup- 
plementary materials are placed at the disposal of instructors and 
students as needed. 

WIDE EXPERIENCE GAINED IN CLINICS 

The clinical facilities of The New York Hospital are unsurpassed 
for the care and study of patients. The Hospital is comprised of five 
clinical departments, largely self-contained. Each of these is provided 
not only with facilities adequate in every way for medical practice 
both for in-patients and out-patients, but also with facilities for teach- 
ing and for the conduct of research. An unusual number of specialized 
clinical services are therefore available which are seldom found within 
a single organization. The Hospital has a capacity of over one thousand 
beds and during the past year 26,224 patients were admitted, exclusive 
of newborns. The conduct of research in all clinical departments gives 



8 SCHOOL OF NURSING 

the student nurse an opportunity to become increasingly aware of the 
part which the nurse must be prepared to play in research projects. 
Authenticity of the findings in such studies depends in no small degree 
on the accuracy with which the nurse carries out tests and procedures, 
observes and records reactions. 

The Medical and Surgical Departments include, in addition to 
general medicine and general surgery, pavilions devoted to the special- 
ties of communicable disease (including tuberculosis), medical neu- 
rology and metabolism, urology, ear, nose and throat disorders, ortho- 
pedic, plastic and neuro-surgery, and ophthalmology. The Woman's 
Clinic has a capacity of 190 adults and 121 newborns and provides 
for obstetric and gynecologic patients. During the past year 4,020 
babies were born in this clinic. 

The Department of Pediatrics includes 90 beds, with separate floors 
for the care of sick infants, older children, and premature babies. 
Facilities for the recreation of convalescent children and the services 
of a play therapist offer opportunities for the student of nursing to 
study the development and guidance of convalescent as well as sick 
children. There is a nursery school within this Department. Here the 
student works with and observes the development of the normal child, 
and is thus better able to evaluate deviations from the normal which 
may accompany illness. 

The Payne Whitney Clinic for psychiatric care has a bed capacity of 
110 patients and offers participation in hydrotherapy, occupational and 
recreational therapy as part of the experience in the care of the 
mentally ill. The close connection between the psychiatric medical 
staff and the medical staffs of the other clinical departments, on a 
consultation basis, gives the student an opportunity to study the close 
relationship between mental and physical illness throughout her ex- 
perience in the Hospital. 

OUT-PATIENT SERVICES 

The Out-Patient Department provides excellent opportunity for the 
study of patients who are treated without being admitted to the Hos- 
pital. Last year there were 285,444 visits to this Department, an average 
of 987 each clinic day. Opportunity is provided for participation in 
the instruction and guidance of expectant mothers through mothers' 
classes, family studies, and nutrition conferences. Students participate 
in various aspects of the treatment and follow T -up on venereal diseases 
and many other activities related to the care of patients coming to the 
Out-Patient Department. 






FACILITH s FOR INS I R I c I [ON 9 

PUBLIC HEALTH AFFILIATIONS 

Cooperation with the Visiting Nurse Service of New York, the De- 
partment of Educational Nursing of the Community Service Societ) 
of New York, and other community agencies affords experience in the 
nursing care and health teaching of patients in their homes. The Kips 
Bay-Yorkville Health Center, the Lenox Hill Neighborhood House, 
and the Guggenheim Dental Clinic, all located within two blocks of 
the Hospital, are some of the agencies which oiler convenient oppor- 
tunity for student observations of community health programs. 

The staff of the Social Service Department of The New York Hos- 
pital participates in the instruction of student nurses through lectures, 
conferences, and case discussions. 



Requirements for 
Admission and Graduation 

REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION 

All students enter the School of Nursing on the recommendation 
of the faculty Committee on Admissions which reviews all applications. 
Since nursing requires women of integrity, of high intelligence, and 
with a deep interest in public service, those candidates are selected 
whose credentials indicate high rank in scholarship, personal fitness 
for nursing, maturity, and good general health. 

AGE AND HEALTH REQUIREMENTS 

As each applicant is considered in the light of her total qualifications, 
there are no definite age limits. In general, however, it is expected that 
applicants will fall within the range of 18 to 35 years. The results of 
a complete physical examination as well as those of a dental examina- 
tion must be submitted at the time of application. Inoculation against 
typhoid fever and vaccination against smallpox will be required of all 
students before admission to the school. 

EDUCATIONAL REQUISITES 

The minimum educational requisites for admission are satisfactory 
completion of at least two years of college (60 semester hours exclusive 
of physical education). The applicant may take her college work at 
Cornell University in Ithaca, New York, usually in the College of Arts 
and Sciences or the College of Home Economics, or at any university 
or senior or junior college accredited by one of the regional associations 
of colleges and secondary schools. 

It is not necessary for the work of these two years to be part of a 
designated "Nursing" or "Pre-Nursing" course. Excellent preparation 
is possible through other programs of study, such as Liberal Arts or 
Home Economics. 

Because the work of the nurse requires that she have an understand- 
ing of human reactions and of social factors influencing community 
development, that she be able to express herself well and participate in 

10 






REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION AND GRADUATION 11 

community planning for nursing services, it is important that she 
obtain a sound background in history, psychology and other social 
sciences, as well as in literature, English, and foreign languages. With 
the exception of psychology, indicated below, specific requirements in 
these subjects are not laid down because a variety of satisfactory com- 
binations can be accepted. A sound two-year liberal arts program serves 
as the best foundation on which to build all professional advancement. 

Physical and biological sciences are important in the preparation for 
admission, but should not be taken at the expense of the subjects re- 
ferred to above. Obviously, the young woman who can devote more 
than two years to her liberal arts preparation has more leeway to in- 
clude several science courses in her college work as well as further 
general academic courses. Unquestionably this would be desirable in 
preparation for many positions in the field of nursing. 

In addition to the academic and health requirements, consideration 
will be given to the applicant's personal fitness for nursing. 

CREDIT REQUIREMENTS 

All applicants are required to have completed college courses in the 
following physical and social sciences before admission to the School of 
Nursing: 

Chemistry (including laboratory) 6 credit hours 

Biology or Zoology (including laboratory) 6 credit hours 

Psychology 3 credit hours 

Human Anatomy, Physiology and Bacteriology will not be ac- 
cepted as fulfilling the 6-hour credit required in biological science. 

Not more than 12 hours of biological science will be counted to- 
ward meeting the 60 credit hours required for admission. 

In general, the principle applies that those courses given within the 
School of Nursing cannot be credited toward meeting admission re- 
quirements, because there is no allowance within the professional cur- 
riculum for electives. 

It is suggested that you take this bulletin with you each time you 
register for your program in your first two years of college, and show 
this section to your adviser, who will help you in selection of courses 
to meet these requirements. Applicants who do not meet in full the 
specific subject requirements for admission, but who have a good 
record of two or more years of college, are encouraged to communicate 
with the Dean of the School of Nursing for consideration of the credits 
which can be offered. Assistance can also be given in arranging plans 
for taking required subjects in summer session. 



12 SCHOOL OI NURSING 

APPLICATION FOR ADMISSION 

A blank for formal application for admission to the School of Nurs- 
ing, containing full instructions, may be obtained by returning the 
form at the back of this bulletin to the Dean of the Cornell University- 
New York Hospital School of Nursing, 525 East Sixty-eighth Street, 
New York 21, N. Y. As one measure of suitability for nursing, certain 
psychometric tests are required before admission. The applicant is 
asked to meet the charge of $5.00 for these tests. 

Arrangements for a personal interview will be made with the ap- 
plicant whose record shows promise of meeting the requirements of the 
school. She will meet with a member of the Committee on Admissions 
of the school in New York, or, if this is not practicable, with an alumna 
or other qualified person designated by the Committee and living in 
the vicinity of the applicant. 

Candidates for admission must make a deposit of $25.00 upon noti- 
fication of acceptance to the school. The full amount is credited to- 
ward fees payable at registration. The deposit is not refundable if the 
candidate withdraws her application. 

It is desirable that prospective applicants enroll with the school as 
early as possible, so that they may receive assistance in planning their 
programs in high school and college to gain the best possible edu- 
cational background preparatory to entering the School of Nursing. 

Applications will be accepted as long as there are vacancies in the 
entering class. To be assured consideration, however, formal applica- 
tion should be made during the second term of the first college year, 
if the applicant plans to enter this school after her second college year. 
When all reports are in for work completed during the first college 
year, and they appear to be satisfactory, the applicant will be accepted, 
pending satisfactory fulfillment of all requirements. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR 
PROMOTION AND GRADUATION 

The established system of grading is a scale of F to A, with D as 
the lowest passing grade. An average of C for each term is required 
for promotion without condition. A grade of C is required in the 
courses Nursing Arts I, Nursing Arts II, Pharmacology I. A grade be- 
low C in any clinical field of nursing practice or a term average which 
is less than C places a student on condition. This must be removed 
by the end of the next term to insure further promotion. A student 
on condition must observe certain limitations in relation to her social 
activities. 



REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION AND GRADUATION 13 

A grade of I (Incomplete) is assigned if the work of a course is not 
completed because of illness or unavoidable absence and if, in the 
judgment of the instructor, the student has shown evidence that she 
can complete the course satisfactorily within a reasonable length of 
time. 

An F (Failure) in any given subject may necessitate withdrawal from 
the school unless the student's scholarship is exceptional in other re- 
spects, in which case repetition of the course may be recommended by 
the instructor, if the course is available. 

No more than one re-examination will be permitted in the case of 
failure in the midterm and/or final examination in a course, and only 
upon the recommendation of the instructor and approval by the Dean. 
In case a re-examination is permitted it is the responsibility of the 
student to arrange with the instructor for a plan of study preparatory 
to it. A charge of $2.00 will be made for each re-examination. 

At the end of each term the student's progress is considered by the 
Promotion Committee. Her accomplishment in theory and practice 
and her relationships with patients and co-workers are taken into ac- 
count. A student who is not maintaining an acceptable level in her 
work and who does not demonstrate that she has or is developing the 
qualifications which are important for a good nurse may be put on 
probation or asked to withdraw from the school. The school reserves 
the privilege of retaining only those students who, in the judgment of 
the faculty, satisfy the requirements of scholarship, health, and personal 
suitability for nursing. The student is kept informed of her progress 
through individual term conferences, and every effort is made to pro- 
vide assistance and guidance which will help the student succeed in 
the school. 

DEGREE AND DIPLOMA 

The degree of Bachelor of Science in Nursing is granted by Cornell 
University and a diploma in nursing is conferred by The New York 
Hospital. In order to qualify for the degree and diploma, the student 
must maintain a cumulative average of C for the three-year program, 
and must have completed satisfactorily all of the courses outlined in 
this catalogue. 

ADVANCED STANDING 

A student who has received her baccalaureate degree before admis- 
sion may apply for a reduction in total time in clinical experience, thus 
reducing her time in the school by two to four months. An average of 
B in theory and in practice throughout the course is necessary for favor- 
able consideration. Exemption must be requested during the last term 
of the second year. 



Accreditation of School 



This school is accredited by the New York State Department of Edu- 
cation and is an active member of the Association of Collegiate Schools 
of Nursing. It is accredited jointly by the National League of Nursing 
Education and the National Organization for Public Health Nursing. 
Through this last-named accreditation, graduates of this school are 
classified as qualified public health staff nurses, in addition to being 
prepared for first-level positions in hospitals and in other fields of 
nursing. 



State Registration for Graduates 



Graduates are eligible for admission to the examination for licensure 
administered by the Regents of the State of New York and are expected 
to take such an examination immediately upon completion of the 
course. Satisfactory completion of this examination classifies the gradu- 
ate of the school as a Registered Nurse (R.N.) in the State of New York, 
and by reciprocal arrangements in other states. In New York State 
citizenship, or declared intention of becoming a citizen, is required. 
If citizenship is not completed within seven years from the declaration 
of intention, state licensure is revoked. 

To become registered in New York State, a nurse must be licensed 
by examination in the state in which she graduated. For this reason 
graduates from this school are urged to take State Board examinations 
in New York State rather than in another state to avoid difficulties 
should they wish to practice in New York State at a future date. 



11 



Fees and Expenses 



Fees and other expenses which must be met by the student are as follows: 

First Second Third 

FEES (Effective Oct. 1949) Year Tear Tear Total 

Matriculation $ 10.00 $ 10.00 

Tuition 200.00 $150.00 $100.00 450.00 

Public Health Affiliation 60.00 60.00 

Laboratory 30.00 30.00 

Library 3.00 3.00 3.00 9.00 

Health 12.00 12.00 12.00 36.00 

Graduation 25.00 25.00 

Student Organization 5.25 5.25 5.25 15.75 



$260.25 $170.25 $205.25 $635.75 



OTHER EXPENSES (Subject to variation) 

Aprons and accessories of uniforms $ 34.00 

Uniform shoes 12.90 

Uniform sweater 5.00 

Uniform cape (optional) 17.60 

Gymnasium suit 11.00 

Books, keys, bandage scissors, and 

miscellaneous (approx.) 40.00 

Rental laboratory coat 1.00 

Rental public health uniform 

Miscellaneous expenses in connection 

with field trips, etc 2.00 



$123.50 
TOTAL FEES AND EXPENSES $383.75 



METHOD OF PAYMENT 







$ 34.00 




$ 12.90 


25.80 

5.00 

17.60 

11.00 


$ 5.00 


5.00 


50.00 
1.00 




5.00 


5.00 


2.00 


30.00 


34.00 


$ 7.00 


$ 52.90 


$183.40 


$177.25 


$258.15 


$819.15 



Upon acceptance for admission a deposit of $25.00 is required. This 
is credited toward the tuition for the first year but is not refundable if 
the application is withdrawn. The $200.00 tuition for the first year is 
payable as follows: $25.00 upon acceptance, SI 25.00 at registration, and 
$50.00 at the beginning of the second term. Other first year fees are pay- 
I able at registration. 



16 SCHOOL OF NURSING 

Students will be billed for second and third year fees at the beginning 
of each year. An exception is the fee for graduation which is payable 
at the beginning of the third term of the third year and is refundable 
if the student is not graduated. The Student Organization fee is payable 
to the class treasurer. 

The school reserves the right to change its fees as necessary to con- 
form with economic trends. 

None of the articles listed under "Other Expenses" should be ob- 
tained before admission to the school. Uniform accessories, shoes, and 
sweater will be ordered after registration and are paid for upon de- 
livery. Estimated expenses for books include approximately $10.00 for 
optional purchases. A list of necessary personal equipment and the 
fees payable on registration day will be sent to each student when ac- 
cepted for admission. 

MAINTENANCE 

The student receives full maintenance (room, board and laundry) 
without cost except during the public health affiliation when she may 
have to purchase luncheon in the district to which she is assigned. The 
necessary dresses (except the public health uniform) and caps are pro- 
vided without charge. Items of the uniform for which the student pays 
are listed under "Other Expenses." In case of illness, limited infirmary 
and hospital care is provided without cost. (See "Health Service.") 



Scholarships and Financial Aid 

FUND OF THE COMMITTEE FOR SCHOLARSHIPS 

The Committee for Scholarships for the Cornell University-New 
York Hospital School of Nursing, a newly-organized group of lay 
women, has made available a limited number of scholarships to enter- 
ing students on the basis of all-round good record as indicated by aca- 
demic work, participation in school or community activities, special 
abilities and personal qualities indicating promise. All students ap- 
plying for admission are considered for these scholarships, but students 
who are interested are encouraged to so indicate in their applications 
for admission. Scholarships are awarded by the Executive Faculty on 
the recommendation of the Admissions Committee. 

A few scholarships are available to second and third year students 
and are awarded on the basis of good scholastic standing and need for 
financial assistance. Application should be made to the Dean of the 



HEALTH S1.K\ ic I 17 

school at least two months before the first term of the year for which a 
scholarship is desired. Awards are made by the Executive Faculty on 
recommendation of the Promotions Committees. 

W. K. KELLOGG FOUNDATION LOAN FUND 

Grants not to exceed $200 in any year are available to students on a 
basis of need, character, and academic achievement. Application should 
be made to the Dean of the school. 

STUDENT LOAN FUND 

Loans are available through this fund, after the first term in the 
school, for those students who show promise in nursing and are in need 
of financial aid. 

LOUISA WARDNER SCUDDER FUND 

Income from this fund is used for purposes of recreation or to fi- 
nance a needed rest or convalescence for one or more students. 

IRENE SUTLIFFE SCHOLARSHIP FUND 

Through the generosity and foresight of the alumnae of the school 
and in honor of Irene Sutliffe, the Director of the school from 1886 to 
1902, scholarship grants are available to graduates of the school for 
postgraduate study. They are granted primarily to graduates who are 
qualifying for specific positions connected with the School of Nursing. 

ARTHUR WILLIAMS SCHOLARSHIP FUND 

A few scholarships are available from these funds primarily lor 
graduate nurses. 



Health Service 



Because good health is of the utmost importance, the school main- 
tains a health service under the general direction of a committee of the 
faculty with a physician appointed to the staff of the school. Upon 
admission to the school a physical examination by the school physician 
and a chest X-ray are required. Subsequently a chest X-ray is required 
every six months, and a physical examination during each school year. 
A Dick and a Schick test are performed on all students after admission 
to the school; immunization to diphtheria is administered to those re- 



18 SCHOOL OF NURSING 

acting positively to the latter. Mantoux tests will be given during the 
pre-clinical period and for those who are negative will be repeated at 
regular intervals. In addition, B. C. G. vaccine is provided to negative 
reactors. 

A well-equipped infirmary with necessary staff is maintained in the 
Nurses Residence. Gratuitous infirmary care for minor illnesses will 
be limited to four weeks at any one time in the case of all students. For 
more serious illnesses students will be cared for gratuitously in the 
Hospital for not more than two weeks at any one time for the first year 
students, and not more than four weeks at any one time for second and 
third year students. Expenses for special nursing care and special 
therapies must be borne by the student or her family. 

All students pay a Health Fee totaling $36.00 during the three years. 
This fee covers examinations, immunizations, and care in the Hospital 
and infirmary, as referred to above. Only emergency surgery is included. 
This is defined as surgical procedures which, in the opinion of the 
school physician or a consulting surgeon of The New York Hospital 
staff, are necessary for the immediate welfare and safety of the student. 
The fee does not include surgery for the correction of chronic remedial 
defects. 

If, in the opinion of the school authorities, the condition of a stu- 
dent's health makes it unwise for her to remain in the school, she may 
be required to withdraw, either temporarily or permanently, at any 
time. 



Vacations and Absences 



A vacation of four weeks is given in each of the first two years and 
three weeks in the third. Students entering with a baccalaureate de- 
gree, who have an exemption of time, are not granted a vacation in 
the third year. All vacations are arranged to conform to the require- 
ments of the educational program, but usually fall within the summer 
months. 

As a result of absences the repetition of a course of study or special 
examinations may be required, class registration may be changed and 
nursing practice may have to be made up. 



Activities 



RESIDENCE FACILITIES 

Students live in the Nurses Residence, a sixteen-story fireproof 
building adjacent to the Hospital. Every effort has been made in the 
construction and equipment of the residence to provide for the normal 
and healthy life of students and staff. 

Comfortable lounges, reading, reception, and dining rooms are lo- 
cated on the first and ground floors. Students have attractively fur- 
nished single rooms with running water and each of the eight student 
floors is equipped with ample baths, showers, and toilet facilities, a 
laundry, and a common sitting room with adjoining kitchenette for in- 
formal gatherings. 

RECREATIONAL FACILITIES 

Believing that the education of young women today must include 
healthful social relationships, generous provision for this development 
in the life of the student has been made. 

An excellent library of fiction and biography includes both current 
and standard works and many magazines of general interest. A branch 
of the New York Public Library is located within a few blocks of the 
Hospital. 

In addition to the lounges for informal and formal use, a large audi- 
torium is located on the first floor of the residence. Sun porches and a 
hobby room are also available for general use. Students who have had 
preparation in music are urged to keep up their interest and practice. 
Student activities planned jointly with the Cornell University Medical 
College are a regular part of the recreation and include glee club and 
dramatic productions. Programs are presented at intervals during the 
year. Students are hostesses at Open House every Sunday evening when 
friends are welcomed to games, conversation, and refreshments. 

By arrangement with a nearby school, an indoor swimming pool is 
available. Through the Students' Athletic Association plans are made 
for joining the other schools of nursing in special sports events. Beach 
equipment and an outdoor grill are available through the House Com- 
mittee. 

19 



2) SCHOOL OF NURSING 

To insure the full benefit of proper use of these facilities a Residence 
Director and well-qualified assistants for special activities are in charge. 
House activities are planned by the House Committee, which is made 
up of representatives of those living in the residence, of staff members 
living out, and of alumnae. Guest rooms are usually available for friends 
and relatives at a nominal charge. 

The cultural opportunities of New York City are almost limitless 
in music, art, ballet, theatre, and libraries. Through the House Com- 
mittee students and graduates enjoy the benefits of such opportunities 
as membership in the Metropolitan Museum of Art, American Museum 
of Natural History, Metropolitan Opera Guild, Institute of Arts and 
Sciences, and the Student and Professional Ticket Service. 

An annual activity fee, paid by students and graduates alike, sup- 
ports the varied activities. 

The students edit and publish a paper, "The Blue Plaidette," every 
two months. Each class produces its own yearbook, known as "The 
Blue Plaid." 

There are two religious clubs with voluntary memberships. Guest 
speakers and planned forums provide an opportunity for exchange of 
thought on many problems. 

SCHOOL GOVERNMENT 

The students take a large share of responsibility for the regulation 
of their own affairs. All belong to the Student Organization which 
functions, with the Faculty Committee on Student Affairs, in all mat- 
ters relating to social and professional activities. 

As in other parts of the University, one rule governs the conduct of 
students in the School of Nursing: "A student is expected to show both 
within and without the School unfailing respect for order, morality, 
personal honor and the rights of others." The rule is construed as ap- 
plicable at all times, in all places, to all students. 

COUNSELING SERVICES 

The school maintains active counseling services which are available 
at all times to any student who needs assistance, either in connection 
with routine matters that may come up in her normal work in the 
school or in connection with special personal problems. 

The Counselor of Students cooperates with the faculty to see that 
those students who need help on questions of educational program, 
finances, health, extracurricular activities and the like, are directed to 
those members of the staff w T ho are best qualified to be of assistance in 
relation to the particular problem at hand. 



CURRICULUM 21 

The objective of the counseling program is to make it possible for 
am student to obtain such guidance as she may require in any phase 
of her life while in the School of Nursing. 

ALUMNAE ASSOCIATION 

The Cornell University-New York Hospital School of Nursing Alum- 
nae Association, originally the Alumnae Association of The New York 
Hospital School of Nursing, was organized in 1893. It was one of the 
ten alumnae associations which helped to bring about the national 
professional organization of nurses first known as the Nurses Associ- 
ated Alumnae of the United States and Canada, now the American 
Nurses' Association. In 1945 the Alumnae Association became a part 
of the Cornell University Alumni Association. 

One of the lounges of the residence is known as the Alumnae Room, 
and the alumnae meetings and many alumnae functions are held in 
this room. 



Curriculum 



The curriculum covers a period of three calendar years, the full 
time being spent in residence at the school, with the exception of vaca- 
tions which totar eleven weeks. Each year is divided into three terms, 
two of sixteen weeks and the summer term of twenty weeks which in- 
cludes vacation. 

In each clinical service related classes, conferences, and bedside in- 
structions are given concurrently with practice. Throughout the course 
emphasis is placed on disease prevention and health instruction. In 
several of the clinical services the student receives experience in eve- 
ning and night duty, so that she may have a complete picture of the 
nursing needs of patients at all hours of the day and night. 

An introduction to community nursing and to the various agencies 
assisting at the time of illness is provided through conferences with the 
staff members of community health agencies, observation in various 
community organizations, discussions centered around family health 
and participation in the referral of patients requiring nursing care alter 
discharge from the Hospital. An eight-week period of supervised prac- 
tice in family health service is provided through affiliation with the 
Visiting Nurse Service of New York, a family health agency. 

The school reserves the right to make changes in the curriculum as 
the need arises. The three-year program of theory and experience 
follows. 



22 SCHOOL OF NURSING 

FIRST YEAR 

The first twenty-five weeks are devoted primarily to class and labora- 
tory assignments with a limited amount of nursing practice in the pavil- 
ions of the Hospital. There is one week of vacation at Christmas time. 
During the last half of the year the student is assigned to the Depart- 
ments of Medicine and Surgery for theory and practice in those clinical 
fields. The services in which she has experience include in addition to 
general medicine and general surgery, such specialties as ophthalmol- 
ogy, otolaryngology, neurology, and communicable disease. A vacation 
of three weeks is given in the last term. The following courses are 
taken: 

Nam- Class * Weeks' Semester 
Coarse Title her Hours Practice Hr. Credits 

Orientation 15 

Nursing Arts 1 121 146 4.5 

Nursing Arts II 122 193 3 

Pharmacology 1 124 15 0.5 

Pharmacology II 125 30 2 

Anatomy 100 60 2.5 

Physiology 101 45 2.5 

Biochemistry 102 60 3 

Microbiology 103 45 2 

Clinical Pathology 104 15 0.5 

Personality Growth and Development 110 15 1 

Social and Health Aspects of Nursing Ill 30 2 

Professional Adjustments 1 117 15 1 

Nutrition and Cookery 130 30 1 

Diet Therapy 131 30 1 

Medicine 140 32 2 

Communicable Disease 141 13 1 

Principles of Medical Nursing (Including Com- 
municable Disease) 142 60 4 

Practice of Medical Nursing 143 12 3 

Surgery (Including specialties other than Urology) 1 50 30 2 

Principles of Surgical Nursing 151 45 3 

Practice of Surgical Nursing 152 12 3 

Physical Education 10 55 

Total 979 24 44.5 

*In addition to the class hours indicated above, each practice period includes a minimum 
of one hour a week of planned instruction directly related to the nursing care of those patients 
for whom the student has some responsibility. 



CURRICULUM 23 

SECOND YEAR 

The three terms of the second year are devoted to classes and 
practice in the Pediatric Clinic and Child Development Institute, the 
Woman's Clinic, and the Departments of Medicine, Surgery and Op- 
erating Room. There is a four-week vacation during the summer term. 

In the Pediatric Clinic and Child Development Institute the stu- 
dent has an opportunity for experience in the Out-Patient Department, 
Nursery School, the premature nursery, the infant floor, and the unit 
for older children. In the Woman's Clinic assignments for practice 
include the Out-Patient Department, delivery floor, nursery, post- 
partum unit, and gynecologic division. During the period in the De- 
partments of Medicine and Surgery experience is provided in Diet 
Therapy practice and in Communicable Disease nursing. Eight weeks 
are spent in the Operating Room. Courses are as follows: 

Num- Class *Weeks > Semester 
Course Title ber Hours Practice Ilrs. Credit 

History of Nursing 116 30 2 

Development of Behavior in Children 171 30 2 

Pediatrics 170 15 1 

Principles of Pediatric Nursing 172 60 4 

Practice of Pediatric Nursing 173 10 4 

Obstetrics and Gynecology 1 60 30 2 

Principles of Obst. and Gyn. Nursing 161 30 2 

Practice of Obst. and Gyn. Nursing 162 16 4 

Principles of Operative Technique 155 15 1 

Practice of Operative Technique 156 8 2 

Practice of Communicable Disease Nursing 144 4 1 

Practice of Diet Therapy 132 4 1 

Physical Education 10 32 

Total 242 48 27 

*In addition to the class hours indicated above, each practice period includes a minimum 
of one hour a week of planned instruction directly related to the nursing care of those patients 
for whom the student has some responsibility. 



24 SCHOOL OF NURSING 

THIRD YEAR 

The three terms of the third year provide many interesting oppor- 
tunities and experiences. Sixteen weeks are spent in the Payne Whitney 
Psychiatric Clinic where the student gains a keen appreciation of the 
causes of mental and emotional illness as well as a knowledge of the 
newer methods of therapy for their relief. 

An eight-week affiliation is provided with the Visiting Nurse Serv- 
ice of New York, a family health agency. During this time the student 
has an opportunity, under supervision, to care for patients in their 
homes and to teach members of the family to give necessary care be- 
tween visits of the nurse. Closely preceding or following this, there is 
a four-week period spent in the Medical-Surgical units of the Out- 
Patient Department, where non-hospitalized patients are treated. This 
is followed by four weeks in the private patient service. 

During one term of this last year, the senior returns once more to 
the Departments of Medicine and Surgery. Because of her increased 
knowledge and experience she is now ready to accept almost complete 
responsibility for analyzing and planning to meet the nursing needs 
of her patients. She receives instruction in planning the time and as- 
signments of staff personnel, and has senior charge duty for a period 
of approximately six weeks. There are three weeks of vacation during 
the summer term. Courses in the third year are: 

Num- Class Weeks' 1 Semester 
Course Title her Hours Practice Hrs. Credit 

Psychiatry 180 30 2 

Principles of Psychiatric Nursing 181 60 4 

Practice of Psychiatric Nursing 182 *16 4 

Introduction to Public Health Nursing 113 30 2 

Practice in Public Health Nursing 114 * 8 2 

Family and Community Health 112 22 1.5 

Professional Adjustments II 118 15 1 

Ward Activities and Relationships 119 15 1 

Emergency Nursing 123 18 1 

Practice of Out-Patient Nursing (M&S) 115 ** 4 1 

Practice in Care of Private Patient (M&S) 146 ** 4 1 

Principles of Surgical Nursing 153 15 1 

Practice of Surgical Nursing 154 * 8 2 

Practice of Medical Nursing 145 **9 2 

Total 205 49 25.5 

Grand Total 1426 121 97 

*In addition to the class hours indicated above, each practice period includes a minimum of 
one hour a week of planned instruction directly related to the nursing care of those patients for 
whom the student has some responsibility. 

**In addition to class hours indicated above, each practice period includes a minimum of two 
hours a week of planned instruction directly related to the nursing care of those patients for 
whom the student has some responsibility. 



A student nurse, a graduate nurse, and four small patients enjoy dinner time in the 
Pediatrics Department. 




Here is one of the attractive single student rooms in the Nurses Residence. 




A student helps a hay fever sufferer in the busy Allergy Clinic. The Out-Patient 
Department last year took care of 285,444 patient visits. 



Description of Courses 

(See requirements for promotion and graduation, pages 12—13.) 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

10. PHYSICAL EDUCATION. It is a major aim of this course to provide cadi 
student with the knowledge of good body mechanics in work and play. Through 
individual and group sports, she has the opportunity to become adept in the acthitv 
which she enjoys the most. A reasonable degree of skill in one or more sports is an 
important factor in the development of a happy recreational life for the individual. 
55 Hours, first Year; 32 Hours, Second Year. Miss McDERMOTT, Miss BETAGH. 

BIOLOGICAL AND PHYSICAL SCIENCES 

100. ANATOMY. This course includes both gross and microscopical anatomy. The 
gross anatomy is taught by lectures, demonstrations, and student dissection of the 
cadaver. The microscopical work is directly correlated with the gross dissection and 
includes a detailed study of prepared slides. Significant embryological information 
is included in the lectures. 

60 Hours. First Year. Dr. HINSEY, Dr. GEOHEGAN, Dr. BERRY. 

101. PHYSIOLOGY. The course is directed toward an understanding of the prin- 
ciples involved in the functioning of the human body and the integration of its 
various systems. It is an essential prerequisite to the study of nursing arts, nutrition, 
and pathologv. Lectures, recitations, demonstrations, and laboratory. 

45 Hours. First Year. Dr. Du BOIS, Miss RYX BERGEN, Dr. RICHARDS, Miss 
CLYMER. 

102. BIOCHEMISTRY. A course designed to acquaint students with some of the 
fundamental principles of phvsiological chemistry as these apply to nursing practice. 
Studies of water balance, the digestion and metabolism of food, and the composition 
of blood, milk, and urine are included. Lectures, recitations, demonstrations, and 
1 a bora tor v. 

60 Hours. First Year. Dr. du VIGNEAUD, Miss RYNBERGEN, Dr. GILDER, Miss 
CLYMER. 

103. MICROBIOLOGY. An introduction to the study of microorganisms, particu- 
larly the microbial agents of disease. Sources, modes of spread and prevention of 
infectious diseases; principles and practice of asepsis. Applications of bacteriologv 
and immunologv to the diagnosis, prevention, and treatment of infectious diseases. 
45 Hours. First Year. Dr. NEILL, Dr. HEHRE. 

101. CLINICAL PATHOLOGY '. A brief orientation course designed to acquaint the 
student with the principles of general pathology and with the more common clinical 
laboratory procedures. The pathologic changes associated with inflammation, neo- 
plasm, and cardiovascular disease are presented and illustrated by kodachromes. 
gross specimens, and microscopic slides. The techniques of routine urinalvsis, blood 
grouping. RH determination, and blood transfusion arc demonstrated. 
15 Hours. First Year. Dr. KELLNER. 

25 



26 SCHOOL OF NURSING 

SOCIAL SCIENCES 

110. PERSONALITY GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT. A presentation of the 
biological, sociological, and psychological factors which contribute to the formation 
of the adult personality. The various stages of personality development, psychological 
responses to emotions, and emotional factors in physical illness are discussed. 
Particular emphasis is placed upon the nurse-patient relationship and the adjust- 
ment of the individual student to the nursing profession. 

15 Hours. First Year. Dr. SHERFEY. 

111. SOCIAL AND HEALTH ASPECTS OF NURSING. Study of the patient as an 
individual, conditioned by psvchological and cultural influences. Interrelationship 
of individual, family, and community health, and the work of the nurse in pre- 
vention of disease and the promotion of health. Lectures, conferences, reports, excur- 
sions to community agencies. 

30 Hours. First Year. Mrs. 0\ ERHOLSER, Miss SOULE. 

112. FAMILY AND COMMUNITY HEALTH. An introduction to the study of 
health problems and services in relation to the family and community. Consideration 
is given to the preparation of public health nurses and to the role of the nurse in 
the total health program. 

20 Hours. Third Year. Dr. SMILLIE and Mrs. OYERHOLSER. 

113. INTRODUCTION TO PUBLIC HEALTH NURSING. A planned program 
of group conferences designed to acquaint the student with the functions of a 
family health agency as part of a community health program; to familiarize her 
with the responsibilities of a field nurse in carrying out these functions, and to point 
out the way these functions and responsibilities demonstrate good public health 
practice. 

30 Hours. Third Year. Miss RANDALL, Miss MOLE, Miss NOTTER, and staff. 

114. PRACTICE IN PUBLIC HEALTH NURSING. Activities include health super- 
vision of infants, school and pre-school children, and adults; maternity nursing. 
morbidity nursing in the home. Through carefully graded observation, individual 
conferences, case conference, and supervised practice, the student is given increasing 
responsibility for health work with a small, selected group of families. This exper- 
ience is by affiliation with the Yisiting Nurse Service of New York, which provides 
a generalized public health nursing service including bedside care of the sick in their 
homes. 

8 Weeks. Third Year. Miss RANDALL, Miss MOLE, Miss NOTTER, and staff. 

115. PRACTICE IN OUT-PATIENT NURSING. Experience is offered in selected 
clinics of the Medical and Surgical services; there are related family studies, con- 
ferences with members of the Social Service Department, visits to community agencies. 
4 Weeks. Third Year. Miss REID, Miss McMULLAN, and staff. 

116. HISTORY OF NURSING. A survey of nursing from its beginning through mod- 
ern times, emphasizing the contributions of nursing to an ever-changing society. 
30 Hours. Second Year. Miss MacLEAN. 

117. PROFESSIONAL ADJUSTMENTS I. Consideration of the philosophical and 
ethical foundations of conduct and their application to the profession of nursing. 
Problems related to group life and adjustments to patients and co-workers are pre- 
sented by students for discussion and analysis. 

15 Hours. First Year. Miss LYONS. 



DESCRIP riON OF COURSI S 27 

118. PROFESSIONAL AD 1 1 STMENTS II. Through a general survey of the nursing 
field, the student has an opportunity to study the trends in the profession, the need 
and opportunities for specialized preparation, the importance and t\pes of Legisla 
tion, the activities of professional organizations and the obligations of their members. 
Lectures and conferences. 

15 Hours. Third Year. Miss DUNBAR, Miss PARKER, and special lecturers. 

119. WARD ACTIVITIES AM) RELATIONSHIPS. Consideration is given to the 
basic principles which underlie effective working relationships with professional and 
non-professional personnel. The student is also guided in recognizing and planning 
for the use of learning situations as they relate to patients or younger students, and 
she is introduced to the activities which she will undertake when assigned to senior 
charge duty. 

15 Hours. Third Year. Miss HARMON, Miss FREDERICK, Miss BRESNAHAN, 
Miss LYONS. 



NURSING AND ALLIED ARTS - GENERAL 

120. ORIENTATION. This course gives the heginning student a general concept 
of the field of nursing and of the responsihilities and obligations of the individual 
who chooses this profession. It emphasizes the importance of the physical and mental 
health of the nurse as it relates to her personal life and is reflected in her work. 

15 Hours, First Year; 1 Hour, Second Year; 1 Hour, Third Year. Miss DUNBAR, 
Miss LYONS, Mrs. OYERHOLSER, Miss McDERMOTT, Mrs. JORDAN, Miss 
LAMBERT, and the school physician. 

121. NURSING ARTS I. This course is designed to give the student an understand- 
ing of the basic physical needs of individuals and of how best these may be met in 
relation to the nursing care of a patient. There is emphasis upon desirable nurse- 
patient relationships, and instruction is given in the simpler nursing procedures. 
Practice includes the application of basic principles of nursing in the Nursing Arts 
Laboratory, and in the care of convalescent patients on the pavilions of the Hospital. 
1-16 Hours. First Year. Miss MacLEAN and assistants. 

122. NURSING ARTS II. A course designed to give the student an understanding 
of advanced nursing principles and procedures, and to assist in the development 
and perfection of skills. It is correlated with lectures on the medical and surgical 
aspects of disease, and with instruction in nursing care pertinent to these conditions. 
Practice includes application of advanced nursing principles and procedures in the 
Nursing Arts Laboratory, and in the care of patients on the pavilions of the Hospital. 
There is opportunity for observation of nursing in the Out-Patient Department and 
for a brief experience in the Central Sterile Supply Department. 

193 Hours. First Year. Miss MacLEAN, Mrs. WANG. 

123. EMERGENCY NURSING. This course deals with the application of nursing 
principles to emergency situations in the home and community. Lectures and demon- 
strations. First Aid certificate granted by American Red Cross. 

18 Hours. Third Year. Dr. REDDEN. 

124. PHARMACOLOGY I. Designed to familiarize the student with the systems used 
in weighing and measuring drugs, methods of making solutions and calculating 
dosages. It stresses the nurse's responsibility in the administration of medicines. 
15 Hours. First Year. Miss McCLUSKEY. 



28 SCHOOL OF NURSING 

125. PHARMACOLOGY II. A course planned to help the student acquire knowledge 
of the facts and principles of drug therapy and of the responsibilities of the nurse 
in the administration of medicines. It includes a study of the important and com- 
monly used drugs, their physiological and therapeutic actions, dosage, administration, 
idiosyncrasies, and toxic symptoms. Emphasis is given to the accurate administration 
of drugs and the careful observation of their effects. 
30 Hours. First Year. Dr. CATTELL, Miss BELCHER. 

NUTRITION 

130. NUTRITION AND COOKERY. A basic course in normal adult nutrition and 
in food preparation. (The nutrition requirements in childhood and in pregnancy are 
discussed during the student's practice on pediatric and obstetric services in the 
second year.) 

30 Hours. First Year. Miss RYNBERGEN, Miss CLYMER. 

131. DIET THERAPY. A course designed to present the underlying principles in the 
treatment of disease by means of special dietaries; given concurrently with the lec- 
tures in Medical and Surgical Diseases. This course is supplemented by conference 
work during the student's practice on medical and surgical services. Lectures, reci- 
tations and laboratory. 

30 Hours. First Year. Miss RYNBERGEN, Miss CLYMER. 

132. PRACTICE OF DIET THERAPY. The application of the principles of diet 
therapy to the care of patients in supervised practice on the pavilions of the Hos- 
pital and in the Out-Patient Clinic. 

4 Weeks, Second Year; 2 Weeks, Third Year. Miss STEPHENSON, Miss RYN- 
BERGEN, Miss CLYMER, Miss TILLOTSON, Miss WEST, Miss RICHMOND. 

MEDICAL NURSING 

140. MEDICINE. Medical aspects of diseases are considered in these lectures and 
clinics. Material presented will supplement, emphasize, and interpret required read- 
ing covering etiology, sources of infection, symptomatology, usual course pathology, 
complications, treatment, prognosis, and prevention. 

30 Hours. First Year. Dr. BARR and staff. 

141. COMMUNICABLE DISEASES. A study of communicable diseases, including 
tuberculosis. Special emphasis is placed upon etiology, modes of transmission and 
prevention. Lectures and clinics. 

13 Hours. First Year. Dr. BARR and staff. 

142. PRINCIPLES OF MEDICAL NURSING INCLUDING COMMUNICABLE 
DISEASE NURSING. The principles and methods of nursing care for patients with 
medical, neurological, and communicable disease are considered. 

45 Hours. First Year. Miss FRITZ, Miss McCLUSKEY, Miss BELCHER. 

143. PRACTICE OF MEDICAL NURSING INCLUDING NEUROLOGICAL 
NURSING. Supervised practice and study of the application of medical nursing 
principles and methods to the care of patients on the medical and neurological 
pavilions of the Hospital. 

8 Weeks. First Year. Miss FRITZ, Miss McCLUSKEY, Miss BELCHER, Miss GRIER 
SON, Mrs. BROCKMAN, Miss WADE. 

144. PRACTICE OF COMMUNICABLE DISEASE NURSING. Two experiences of 
four weeks each are given in which students study and practice medical aseptic 



DESCRIPTION OF COURSES 29 

technique and nursing as related to the care of patients suffering from communi- 
cable diseases, including tuberculosis. 

8 Weeks. First and Second Year. Miss FRITZ, Miss McCLUSKEY, Miss BELCHER, 
Miss GRIERSON, Mrs. BROCKMAN, Miss WADE. 

1 15. PRACTICE OF MEDICAL NURSING. During the senior year students have 
opportunity to apply their knowledge and skill to the care of patients with complex 
nursing needs. Care of patients through the evening and night hours may he in- 
cluded. An overview of the managerial aspects of a clinical unit is given with pro 
vision for supervised practice. 

8 Weeks. Third Year. Miss FRITZ, Miss McCLUSKEY, Miss BELCHER, Miss 
GRIERSON, Mrs. BROCKMAN, Miss WADE. 

146. PRACTICE IN CARE OF PRIVATE PATIENTS. Application of principles 
of medical and surgical nursing to the care of private patients. 
4 Weeks. Third Year. Miss POOR, Miss NIELSEN, and staff. 



SURGICAL NURSING 

150. SURGERY. Conditions which require surgery are presented in these lectures and 
clinics. The factors which determine the need for surgical interference and the type 
of operations best suited to the condition are discussed. Emphasis is placed upon 
observations which should be made by the nurse both preceding and following 
operation. 

30 Hours. First Year. Dr. GLENN and staff. 

151. PRINCIPLES OF SURGICAL NURSING. By the method of lecture and demon- 
stration, the students are taught principles of surgical nursing. This includes the 
principles of surgical asepsis and the nursing care of patients with general surgical 
as well as specialized surgical conditions. 

45 Hours. First Year. Miss KLEIN, Miss FEDDER, Miss DERICKS, Miss SWAN 
WICK, Miss DANIELS, Mrs. GINSBERG. 

152. PRACTICE OF SURGICAL NURSING. This includes study and supervised 
practice in the application of nursing principles to the care of patients on certain 
of the general and special i/ed surgical services of the Hospital. The student is guided 
in gaining a concept of the preventive as well as the therapeutic responsibilities of 
the nurse. 

12 Weeks. First Year. Miss KLEIN, Miss HARMON, Miss FEDDER, Miss DERICRS. 
Mrs. GINSBERG, Miss SABIA, Miss DANIELS, Miss KERBY. 

153. PRINCIPLES OF SURGICAL NURSING. This course is planned to give the 
student a knowledge of the diseases and anomalies of the genitourinary tract, and 
the principles underlying the care of patients with these conditions. Preparation of 
the patient for self-care on discharge is stressed. Lectures, conferences, and demon- 
strations. 

15 Hours. Third Year. Miss SWAN WICK, Dr. MARSHALL, and staff. 

154. PRACTICE OF SURGICAL NURSING. In the third year the student is given 
more responsibility for analyzing and meeting the nursing needs of patients, in- 
cluding preparation for self-care after discharge from the Hospital. In addition she 
has an opportunity to assist with some of the managerial problems on the pavilions. 
8 Weeks. Third Year. Miss KLEIN, Miss HARMON, Miss FEDDER, Miss DERICRS, 
Miss SWANWICK, Mrs. GINSBERG, Miss SABIA, Miss KERBY. 



30 SCHOOL OF NURSING 

155. PRINCIPLES OF OPERATIVE TECHNIQUE. Through lectures and demon- 
strations students are taught the principles and methods of aseptic technique in 
relation to care of patients at the time of operation. 

15 Hours. Second Year. Miss CARBERY, Miss TUFFLEY, Miss DeLELYS. 

156. PRACTICE OF OPERATIVE TECHNIQUE. Supervised clinical experience and 
study of the application of nursing principles to the care of patients in the Operating 
Room. Students are given the opportunity to observe and assist with operative pro- 
cedures, to relate this experience to the total care of surgical patients and to gain an 
appreciation of the qualities and abilities essential to effective nursing in this field. 
8 Weeks. Second Year. Miss CARBERY, Miss TUFFLEY, Miss DeLELYS, and staff. 



OBSTETRIC AND GYNECOLOGIC NURSING 

160. OBSTETRICS AND GYNECOLOGY. This course deals with the clinical, ana- 
tomical, physiological, and pathological aspects of pregnancy, labor, and the puer- 
perium, as well as of the female generative organs. Consideration is given to nutri- 
tional needs, psychosomatic approach in the prevention of complications, family- 
sociologic relationships in child bearing, the nature, development, and adjustment of 
the newborn. 

30 Hours. Second Year. Medical staff of the Woman's Clinic. Miss RYNBERGEN. 

161. PRINCIPLES OF OBSTETRIC AND GYNECOLOGIC NURSING. This 
course emphasizes the importance of prenatal observation and instruction; infant 
care, obstetric and gynecologic procedures, current modes and trends in therapy. 
45 Hours. Second Year. Miss HICKCOX, Miss WALTERS, Miss COLETTI, Miss 
DUSTAN, Miss JUMP, Miss BOYLE, Mrs. MIGUEL, Mrs. BAILEY. 

162. PRACTICE OF OBSTETRIC AND GYNECOLOGIC NURSING. Students ob- 
serve and care for infants, obstetric and gynecologic patients under supervision in 
the pavilions, nurseries, labor, and delivery rooms, and Out-Patient Department. 
Nursing care studies, conferences, and field trips are supplementary features of the 
course. 

16 Weeks. Second Year. Miss HICKCOX, Miss WALTERS, Miss DUSTAN, Miss 
JUMP, Miss BOYLE, Miss COLETTI, Mrs. MIGUEL, Mrs. BAILEY. 



PEDIATRIC NURSING 

170. PEDIATRICS. This course presents a study of the representative diseases of 
infancy and childhood and of the many factors which contribute to health and dis- 
ease. 

15 Hours. Second Year. Dr. LEVINE and staff. 

171. DEVELOPMENT OF BEHAVIOR IN CHILDREN. A study of the normal child 
and his behavior in relation to his growth and needs from infancy to adulthood. 
Special emphasis will be placed on the meaning of physical illness to the normal 
child. 

30 Hours. Second Year. Dr. MERCER. 

172. PRINCIPLES OF PEDIATRIC NURSING. The basic principles in the care of 
sick infants and children are taught in conjunction with the social, educational, and 
nutritional aspects of their treatment and individual needs as growing children. 
60 Hours. Second Year. Miss SCHUBERT, Miss FERGUSON, Miss STOKES, Miss 
TERRY, Miss WOODFALL, Miss RYNBERGEN, and staff. 



DESCRIP HON' OF COURS1 S II 

173. PRACTICE OF PEDIATRIC NURSING. This consists of supervised experience 
in aseptic nursing methods in the cue of infants and children in the pavilion, 
formula laboratory, premature nursery, and Out-Patient Department. Case pre- 
sentations, nursing care plans and conferences. 

I(i Weeks. Second' Year. Miss SCHUBERT, Miss FERGUSON, Miss STOKES, Miss 
WOODFALL, Miss KIERNAN, Miss SIMMONS, Miss TERRY, Miss PEARSON, 
and staff. 

PSYCHIATRIC NURSING 

180. PSYCHIATRY. This course is designed to acquaint the student with the path- 
ology and treatment of psychiatric disorders. The problems frequently encountered 
in infancy, childhood, adolescence, the aging period and senility are discussed. An 
historical survey of the development of psychiatry and the mental hygiene move- 
ment is offered, as well as an introduction to the techniques and social agencies con- 
cerned with helping people meet their prohlems. 

30 Hours. Third Year. Dr. DIETHELM and staff. 

181. PRIXCIPEFS OF PSYCHIATRIC NURSING. The purpose of this course is to 
help the student gain an understanding of the hasic principles in the nursing care 
of patients with personality disorders and the nursing techniques utilized in then 
treatment. Emphasis is placed on the individual patient's specific needs, as they arc 
related to exaggerated emotional reactions which are symptomatic manifestations 
of emotional and physical illness. Field trips are planned to acquaint the student 
with some of the community facilities which arc devoted to rehabilitation, as well 
as prevention and treatment of psychiatric illnesses. The total program is oriented 
toward guiding the student in her development of an objective attitude toward 
emotional disorders, and a broader appreciation of the interrelationships between 
environmental, somatic, and constitutional factors as they influence mental health. 
60 Hours. Third Year. Mrs. WRIGHT, Miss ZIERING, Miss SANTOS, Miss Mil is. 
Miss PAIGE, and staff. 

182. PRACTICE OF PSYCHIATRIC NURSING. This course consists of supervised 
experience in the observation and care of emotionally ill adult and adolescent 
patients, during the acute phase of illness, as well as during convalescence. Students 
have an opportunity to participate in many of the currently approved forms cf 
psychiatric treatment. These include the following therapies: occupational, recre- 
ational, physical, insulin, electro-convulsive, as well as psychotherapy, in each of 
which there is particular emphasis on the special need of the individual patient. 

16 Weeks. Third Year. Mrs. WRIGHT, Miss ZIERING, Miss SANTOS, Miss Mills 
Miss SPARGO, Miss BRINDLE, Miss PAIGE, and staff. 



Administration 



JOINT ADMINISTRATIVE BOARD OF 
THE UNIVERSITY AND THE HOSPITAL 

John Hay Whitney, Chairman July 1 - December 31, 1949 

Edmund Ezra Day, Chairman January 1 -June 30, 1950 

Stanhope Bayne-Jones, President 

Edmund Ezra Day, Chancellor of the 

University \ Board of Trustees 

Neal Dow Becker \ of 

Joseph P. Ripley Cornell University 

John Hay Whitney, President Board of Governors of 

Henry S. Sturgis, Treasurer The Society of 

William Harding Jackson the New York Hospital 

John W. Davis 

COUNCIL OF THE SCHOOL OF NURSING 

Edmund Ezra Day, Chairman Chancellor of Cornell University 

Neal Dow Becker Trustee of Cornell University 

A. Conger Goodyear ( Governors of The Society of 

Langdon P. Marvin } the New York Hospital 

David P. Barr President of the Medical Board of the Hospital 

Stanhope Bayne-Jones President, Joint Administrative Board 

Mrs. August Belmont Representative-at-large 

Helen Daum Alumnae Association, School of Nursing 

Virginia M. Dunbar Dean of the School of Nursing 

Joseph C. Hinsey Dean of Cornell University Medical College 

Henry N. Pratt Director of The New York Hospital 

Marian G. Randall Director of the Visiting Nurse Service of 

New York 

Wilson G. Smillie Professor of Public Health and Preventive 

Medicine, Cornell University Medical College 
Elizabeth Lee Vincent Dean of the State College of Home Eco- 
nomics, Cornell University 

32 



ADMINISTRATION 33 

OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION 

Edmund Ezra Day, Ph.D., LL.D Chancellor of the University 

Cornelis W. de Kiewiet, Ph.D Acting President of the University 

Stanhope Bayne-Jones, M.D.. .President, Joint Administrative Board 

Virginia M. Dunbar, M.A., R.N Dean 

Bessie A. R. Parker, B.S., R.N Associate Dean 

Vkronica Lyons, M.A., R.N Assistant Dean 

Victoria Frederick, M.A Counselor of Students 

Mary T. McDermott, M.A Director of the Residence 

Mrs. Claire Calhoun, M.A Assistant Director of tlie Residence 

Mrs. Helene Jamieson Jordan Director of Public Information 

To Be Appointed Librarian 

ASSISTANTS IN ADMINISTRATION 

Mrs. Gladys B. Hatch Secretary to the Dean 

Margaret E. Vogel Secretary 

Dorothy P. Dillmore Registrar 

Mrs. Elizabeth Sloane Assistant Registrar 

EXECUTIVE FACULTY 

Miss Dunbar, Chairman Miss Schubert, Secretary 

Dr. Barr Miss Fritz Miss Lyons Miss Reid 

Dr. Bayne-Jones Miss Hickcox Mrs. Overholser Mrs. Wright 

Miss Carbery Dr. Hinsey Miss Parker 

Miss Carrington Miss Klein Miss Poor 

CHAIRMEN OF FACULTY COMMITTEES 

Committee on Admissions Miss Harmon 

Committee on Curriculum Miss Lyons 

Committees on Promotion 

First Year Students Miss Rynbergen 

Second Year Students Miss Woodfall 

Third Year Students Miss Reid 

Committee on Student Affairs Miss Frederick 

Committee on Student and Staff Health Mrs. Overholser 

Committee on Student Scholarship Miss Dunbar 

Committee on Affiliating Students Miss Ferguson 

Committee on Programs for Graduate Nurses Miss Newton 

Committee on Records Miss Lyons 

Committee on Library Miss Lyons 

Committee on Principles and Practices of Nursing Miss Fedder 



Faculty 



Edmund Ezra Day, Ph.D., LL.D., Chancellor of the University 
C. W. de Kiewiet, Ph.D., Acting President of the University 

EMERITUS PROFESSORS 

Harriet Frost, R.N., Professor Emeritus of Public Health Nursing 
May Kennedy, M.A., R.N., Professor Emeritus of Nursing 

PROFESSORS 

Virginia M. Dunbar, M.A., R.N., Professor of Nursing, Dean of the School of 
Nursing, Director of the Nursing Service. (A.B., Mount Holyoke College, 1919; Di- 
ploma in Nursing, Johns Hopkins Hospital School of Nursing, 1923; M.A., Columbia 
University, 1930. Diploma, Bedford College and Florence Nightingale International 
Foundation, London, England, 1936.) 

Bessie A. R. Parker, B.S., R.N., Professor of Nursing, Associate Dean of the School 
of Nursing, Associate Director of the Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Rhode 
Island Hospital Training School for Nurses, 1918; B.S., Columbia University, 1937.) 

ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS 

Verda F. Hickcox, B.S., R.N., Associate Professor of Obstetric and Gynecologic 
Nursing, Head of Obstetric and Gynecologic Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, 
Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, Chicago, 111., 1916; B.S., Columbia Uni- 
versity, 1927; Certificate in Midwifery, General Lying-in Hospital and School of Mid- 
wifery, London, England, 1929.) 

Veronica Lyons, M.A., R.N., Assistant Dean, Associate Professor of Nursing. (Di- 
ploma in Nursing, Johns Hopkins Hospital School of Nursing, 1927; B.S., Columbia 
University, 1936; M.A., 1947.) 

Margery T. Overholser, M.A., R.N., Associate Professor of Public Health Nursing, 
Director of Public Health Nursing. (Diploma in Nursing, Wesley Memorial Hospital 
School of Nursing, Chicago, 111., 1922; B.S., Columbia University, 1927; M.A., 1944.) 

Olive M. Reid, A.B., R.N., Associate Professor of Out-Patient Nursing, Head of Out- 
Patient Nursing Service. (A.B., Western College for Women, Oxford, Ohio, 1916; 
Diploma in Nursing, Army School of Nursing, 1921.) 

Agnes Schubert, M.S., R.N., Associate Professor of Pediatric Nursing, Head of 
Pediatric Nursing Service. (B.S., Northwestern University, Evanston, 111., 1917; Diplo- 
ma in Nursing, Western Reserve University School of Nursing, 1926; M.S., Columbia 
University, 1932.) 

Elizabeth U. Wright, M.A., R.N., Associate Professor of Psychiatric Nursing, Director 
of Nursing Service, Payne Whitney Clinic. (Diploma in Nursing, Massachusetts 
General Hospital, 1927; B.S., Columbia University, 1947; M.A., 1948.) 

34 



FACULTY 35 

ASSISTANT PROFESSORS 

•Muriel Carbery, A.B., R.N., Assistant Professor of Surgical Nursing, Head of 
Operating Room Nursing Service. (A.B., Hunter College, 1933; Diploma in Nursing, 
New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1937.) 

Edna FRITZ, M.A., R.N., Assistant Professor of Medical Nursing, Head of the Medical 
Nursing Service. (B.S. in Nursing, Russell Sage College School of Nursing, 1910; 
M.A., Columbia University, 1942.) 

Mary Elizabeth Klein, B.S., R.N., Assistant Professor of Surgical Nursing, Head of 
Surgical Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Hahnemann Hospital School of 
Nursing, Philadelphia, Pa., 1916; B.S., Columhia University, 1936.) 

MARY T. McDermott, M.A., Assistant Professor of Physical Education; Director, 
Nurses' Residence. (Diploma, Bouve Boston School of Physical Education, 1916; B.S.. 
New York University, 1930; M.A., 1932.) 

••Sarah E. Moore, R.N., Assistant Professor of Nursing; Administrative Assistant, 
Dax Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, New York Hospital School of Nursing, 
1913.) 

Kathleen Newton, M.A., R.N., Assistant Professor in Charge of Staff Education and 
Programs for Graduate Nurses. (B.S., University of Washington, Seattle, Wash., 1931; 
Diploma in Nursing, University of Washington School of Nursing, 1936; M.A., 
Columhia University, 1949.) 

M. Eva Poor, A.B., R.N., Assistant Professor of Nursing, Head of Private Patient 
Nursing Service. (A.B., Tufts College, Medford, Mass., 1930; Diploma in Nursing, 
New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1939.) 

Henderika J. Rvnbergen, M.S., Assistant Professor of Science. (B.S., Simmons College, 
Boston, Mass., 1922; M.S., Cornell University Medical College, 1938.) 



Victoria Frederick, M.A., Counselor of Students. (A.B., University of Illinois, 1920; 
M.A., Columbia University, 1926.) 

FACULTY INSTRUCTORS 

Helen Camp Belcher, A.B., R.N., Faculty Instructor in Medical Nursing; Super- 
visor in Medical Nursing Service. (A.B., Mount Holyoke College, 1942; Diploma in 
Nursing, Massachusetts General Hospital School of Nursing, 1944.) 

Frances Lucretia Boyle, B.S., R.N., Faculty Instructor in Obstetric Out-Patient 
Nursing; Supervisor, Obstetric Out-Patient Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, 
Moses Taylor Hospital School of Nursing, Scranton, Pa., 1924; B.S., Columbia Uni- 
versity, 1945.) 

Bfrnice Carrington, B.S., R.N., Faculty Instructor in Nursing; Assistant Director, 
Nursing Service, New York Hospital. (Diploma in Nursing, New Haven Hospital 
School of Nursing, 1924; B.S., Columbia University, 1932.) 

Angela Coletti, M.A., R.N., Faculty Instructor in Obstetric Nursing; Supervisor, 
Newborn Nurseries. (Diploma in Nursing, St. John's Long Island City Hospital 
School of Nursing, Long Island City, N. Y., 1942; B.S., St. John's University, Brooklyn, 
N. Y., 1945; M.A., New York University, 1948.) 

* Leave of absence for study, 1949-1950. 
**Retires October 1, 1949. 



36 SCHOOL OF NURSING 

Virginia Daniels, M.A., R.N., Faculty Instructor in Surgical Nursing; Supervisor, 
Surgical Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Presbyterian Hospital School of 
Nursing, Chicago, 111., 1930; B.S., Columbia University, 1937; M.A., 1948.) 

Virginia Carolyn Dericks, M.A., R.N., Faculty Instructor in Surgical Nursing; Super- 
visor, Surgical Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, St. Joseph Hospital School of 
Nursing, Paterson, N. J., 1939; B.S., Columbia University, 1943; M.A., 1947.) 

Laura C. Dustan, M.N., R.N., Faculty Instructor in Obstetric and Gynecologic 
Nursing; Supervisor, Obstetric and Gynecologic Nursing Service. (B.S., University 
of Vermont, 1940; M.N., Frances Payne Bolton School of Nursing, Western Reserve 
University, 1943; Midwifery Certificate, Maternity Center Association, New York 
City, 1946.) 

Helma Fedder, B.S., R.N., Faculty Instructor in Surgical Nursing; Supervisor, Surgi- 
cal Nursing Service. Diploma in Nursing, Washington University School of Nursing, 
St. Louis, Mo., 1933; B.S., University of Chicago, 1942.) 

Sarah M. Ferguson, B.S., R.N., Faculty Instructor in Pediatric Nursing; Supervisor , 
Pediatric Out-Patient Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Children's Hospital 
School of Nursing, Boston, Mass., 1932; B.S., Columbia University, 1947.) 

Lois F. Grierson, M.A., R.N., Faculty Instructor in Medical Nursing; Evening Super- 
visor in Medical Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, University of Michigan 
School of Nursing, 1927; A.B., Alma College, Alma, Mich., 1930; M.A., Columbia 
University, 1945.) 

Lilian Henderson Ginsberg, B.S., R.N., Faculty Instructor in Surgical Nursing; 
Supervisor in Surgical Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Syracuse University 
School of Nursing, 1930; B.S., Columbia University, 1945.) 

Elizabeth Harmon, B.A., R.N., Faculty Instructor in Surgical Nursing, Assistant 
Head of Surgical Nursing Service. (B.A., College of Wooster, Wooster, Ohio, 1928; 
Diploma in Nursing, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, Chicago, 111., 1931.) 

Pauline Alice Heymann, M.A., R.N., Faculty Instructor in Surgical Nursing; Night 
Supervisor in Surgical Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, University of Kansas 
School of Nursing, Lawrence, Kansas, 1941; B.A., University of Kansas, 1943; M.A., 
Columbia University, 1947.) 

Thirza Hills, B.S., R.N., Faculty Instructor in Surgical Nursing; Evening Supenrisor 
in Surgical Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Presbyterian Hospital School of 
Nursing, Chicago, 111., 1925; B.S., Columbia University, 1942.) 

Dorothy E. Jump, B.S., R.N., Faculty Instructor in Obstetric and Gynecologic 
Nursing; Supervisor, Delivery Room Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Henry 
Ford Hospital School of Nursing, Detroit, Mich., 1942; B.S., Wayne University, 1943.) 

H. Rosalind MacLean, M.A., R.N., Faculty Instructor in Nursing Arts. (B.A., Adel- 
phi College, Garden City, N. Y., 1932; M.A., Columbia University, 1933; Diploma 
in Nursing, New York Hospital School of Nursing, 1937.) 

Audrey McClusky, M.A., R.N., Faculty Instructor in Medical Nursing; Supervisor 

in Medical Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Cornell University-New York 

Hospital School of Nursing, 1944; B.S., Temple University, 1944; M.A., Columbia 
University, 1948.) 

Dorothy McMullan, B.S., R.N., Faculty Instructor in Medical and Surgical Nursing; 
Supervisor, Out-Patient Medical and Surgical Nursing. (Diploma in Nursing, New 
York Hospital School of Nursing, 1935; B.S., New York University, 1948.) 



FACULTY 37 

Eleanor Mliis, B.S., R.N., Faculty lush tutor in Psychiatric Nursing; Supervisor, 
Psychiatric Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Highland Hospital School of 
Nursing, Rochester, N. V.. 1936; B.S., University of Rochester, 1948.) 

Edith Nii lsen, B.S., R.N., Faculty Instructor in Medical and Surgical Nursing; Super- 
visor, Private Patient Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Presbyterian Hospital 
School of Nursing, Chicago, III., 1931; B.S., Columbia University, 1917.) 

LUCILLE Notter, M.A., R.N., Faculty Instructor in Public If call It Nursing; Assistant 
Director of Education, Visiting Nurse Service of New York City. (Diploma in Nursing, 
Sts. Mary and Elizabeth Hospital School of Nursing, Louisville, Ky., 1931; B.S., 
Columbia University, 1911; M.A., 1946.) 

Si i SABIA, B.S., R.N., Faculty Instructor in Surgical Nursing; Evening Supervisor, 
Surgical Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Elizabeth General Hospital School 
of Nursing, Elizabeth, N. J., 1935; B.S., Columbia University, 1943.) 

Elvin Santos, B.S., R.N., Faculty Instructor in Psychiatric Nursing; Supervisor, 
Psychiatric Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Duke University School of Nurs- 
ing, 1943; B.S., Catholic University of America, 1945.) 

Florence Stokf.s, M.A., R.N., Faculty Instructor in Pediatric Nursing; Supervisor iti 
Pediatric Nursi7ig Service. (Diploma in Nursing, St. Luke's Hospital School of 
Nursing, New York City, 1941; B.S., Columbia University, 1945; M.A., 1948.) 

Mary H. Swanwick, B.S., R.N., Faculty Instructor in Surgical Nursing; Supervisor 
in Surgical Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, St. Vincent's Hospital School of 
Nursing, New York City, 1941; B.S., St. John's University, Brooklyn, N. Y., 1945.) 

Ethel Marie Tschida, B.S., R.N., Faculty Instructor in Pediatric Nursing; Super- 
visor in Pediatric Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Mercy Hospital School of 
Nursing, Chicago, 111., 1938; B.S., St. Mary's College, Holy Cross, Inch, 1944; Diploma 
in Public Health Nursing, University of Minnesota, 1948.) 

Edna Tuffley, M.A., R.N., Faculty Instructor in Surgical Nursing; Acting Head of 
Operating Room Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Memorial Hospital School 
of Nursing, Pawtucket, R. I., 1933; B.S., New York University, 1948; M.A., 1919.) 

Jeannette Walters, M.A., R.N., Faculty Instructor in Obstetric and Gynecologic 
Nursing; Assistant Department Head, Obstetric and Gynecologic Nursing Service. 
(Diploma in Nursing, Temple University Hospital School of Nursing, Philadelphia, 
Pa., 1923; B.S., New York University, 1944; M.A., 1949.) 

Ruth Woodfall, B.S., R.N., Faculty Instructor in Pediatric Nursing; Supervisor in 
Pediatric Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Children's Hospital School of 
Nursing, Boston, Mass., 1932; B.S., Columbia University, 1947.) 

Hannah Ziering, M.A., R.N., Faculty Instructor in Psychiatric Nursing; Admin- 
istrative Assistant, Psychiatric Nursing Service. (B.S., Long Island University, Brook- 
lyn, N. Y., 1940; Diploma in Nursing, Cornell University-New York Hospital School 
of Nursing, 1913; B.S., Cornell University, 1913; M.A., Columbia University, 1915.) 



38 SCHOOL OF NURSING 

FROM THE FACULTY OF 
CORNELL UNIVERSITY MEDICAL COLLEGE 

Joseph C. Hinsey, Ph.D Dean and Professor of Anatomy 

David P. Barr, M.D Professor of Medicine 

McKeen Cattell, M.D Professor of Pharmacology 

Oskar Diethelm, M.D Professor of Psychiatry 

Eugene F. Du Bois, M.D Professor of Physiology 

Vincent du Vigneaud, Ph.D Professor of Biochemistry 

Frank Glenn, M.D Professor of Surgery 

John G. Kidd, M.D Professor of Pathology 

Samuel Z. Levine, M.D Professor of Pediatrics 

James M. Neill, Ph.D Professor of Bacteriology and Immunology 

Wilson G. Smillie, M.D Professor of Public Health and Preventive Medicine 

Robert P. Ball, M.D Professor of Radiology 

Gordon R. Douglas, M.D Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology 

Edward J. Hehre, M.D Assistant Professor of Bacteriology and Immunology 

Charles Berry, M.D Assistant Professor of Anatomy 

William A. Geohegan, M.D Assistant Professor of Anatomy 

Helena Gilder, M.D Research Associate in Biochemistry 

To be appointed Assistant in Biochemistry 

To be appointed Instructor in Physiology 

To be appointed Assistant in Physiology 



Associated with the Faculty 



assistants in instruction 

Mary Bailey, B.S., R.N., Assistant in Obstetric and Gynecologic Nursing; Evening 
Supervisor, Obstetric and Gynecologic Nursing Service. (B.S., Brooklyn College, 
1936; Diploma in Nursing, Johns Hopkins Hospital School of Nursing, 1945.) 

Cynthia Betagh, B.S., Assistant in Physical Education. (B.S., Sargent College, Boston 
University, 1948.) 

Ruth Marian Brockman, R.N., Assistant in Medical Nursing; Night Supervisor in 
Medical Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, New York Hospital School of • 
Nursing, 1931.) 

Dorothy Grace Clymer, B.S., Assistant in Science. (B.S., Pennsylvania State College, 
State College, Pa., 1943.) 

Thelma Inez Cobb, R.N., Assistant in Obstetric and Gynecologic Nursing; Night 
Supervisor in Obstetric and Gynecologic Nursing Service. (Teaching Certificate, 
University of Virginia, 1922; Diploma in Nursing, New Jersey State Hospital, Grey- 
stone Park, N. J., 1933.) 

Alice Marie DonDero, R.N., Assistant in Pediatric Nursiiig; Supervisor in Pediatric 
Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Long Island College Hospital, Brooklyn, 
N. Y., 1941.) 



\ssoc [ \ III) WITH FACUL I Y 39 

1 eone Marjorie DeI iivs, U.S., R.N., Assistant in Operating Room Nursing; Assist- 
ant Supervisor, ('.aural Operating Rooms. (Diploma in Nursing, Strong Memorial 
Hospital, Rochester, V Y., 1937; B.S., Columbia University, 1944.) 

Rita Malloch Genner, R.N., Assistant in Nursing; Supervisor, Nurses' Health 
Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing, New Yoik 
City, 1920.) 

l\i/ Gnau, R.N.. Assistant in Psychiatric Nursing; Night Supervisor, Psychiatrit 
Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Jefferson Hospital School of Nursing, Phila- 
delphia, Pa., 1935.) 

Charity Kerby, A.B., R.N., Assistant in Surgical Nursing; Assistant Night Super- 
visor, Surgical Nursing Service. (A.B., Seattle Pacific College, 1931; Diploma in 
Nursing. Swedish Hospital School of Nursing, Seattle, Wash., 1946.) 

EILEEN Kiernan, R.N., Assistant iti Pediatric Nursing; Supervisor in Pediatric Nurs- 
ing Service. (Diploma in Nursing. Cornell University-New York Hospital School of 
Nursing, 1911.) 

Celerina Trinos Miguel, M.A.. R.N., Assistant in Obstetric Nursing; Night Super- 
visor, Obstetric Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing. Mary Johnston Hospital, 
Manila, P. I., 1921; B.S., Columbia University, 1933; M.A., 1931.) 

Mary L. Sillcox, R.N., Assistant in Obstetric and Gynecologic Nursing; Evening 
Supervisor iti Obstetric and Gynecologic Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing. 
Faxton Hospital School of Nursing, Utica, N. Y., 1916.) 

Elizabf.th Mary Simmons, B.S., R.N., Assistant in Pediatric Nursing; Night Super- 
visor in Pediatric Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing, Stamford Hospital School 
of Nursing, Stamford. Conn., 1934; B.S., New York University, 1917.) 

Margaret Terry, B.S., R.N., Assistant in Pediatric Nursing; Evening Supervisor, 
Pediatric Nursing Sen-ice. (Diploma in Nursing, Notre Dame de Lourdes Hospital 
School of Nursing. Manchester, N. H., 1935; B.S.. Boston University, 19 IS.) 

Eleanor Wade, R.N., Assistant i)i Medical Nursing; Assistant Night Supervisor, 
Medical Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing. L\nn Hospital School of Nursing. 
Lynn, Mass., 1939.) 

Mamie Wang, M.A., R.N., Assistant in Nursing Arts. (Diploma in Nursing, Peiping 
Medical College School of Nursing, Peiping, China, 1938; B.S., Yenching University, 
1938; M.A., Columbia University, 1913.) 

Mary Whitaker, R.N.. Assistant in Psychiatric Nursing; Night Supervisor. Psy- 
chiatric Nursing Service. (Diploma in Nursing. McLean Hospital School of Nursing, 
Waverly, Mass.^ 1933.) 

LECTURERS 

W. R. Redden, M.D Emergency Nursing 

American Red Cross, New York Chapter 

Faculty of All Clinical Departments Clinical Lectures 

Cornell Medical College 



STAFF OF THE NEW YORK HOSPITAL 

Henrv N. Pratt, M.D Director 



40 SCHOOL OF NURSING 

ADMINISTRATIVE AND SUPERVISORY NURSING STAFF 

Helen V. Miller, R.N Day Administrative Assistant 

Cora Kay, B.S., R.N Night Administrative Assistant 

Vanda Summers, R.N Evening Administrative Assistant 

Doris F. Bresnahan, B.S., R.N. ..Day Administrative Assistant in Charge of 

Auxiliary Staff 

Marjorie Agnew, B.S., R.N Supervisor, Private Patients Service 

Mary Brennan, B.S., R.N Supervisor, Private Patients Service 

Anne Hughes, B.S., R.N Supervisor, Private Patients Service 

Inez Mullen, B.S., R.N Evening Supervisor, Private Patients Service 

Ruth Nielsen, R.N Night Supervisor, Private Patients Service 

Margaret DeWitt, R.N Assistant Super-visor, Gynecologic Operating Rooms 

Lucy Hickey, R.N Assistant Supervisor, General Operating Rooms 



Bailey, June 
Carman, Edna 



Cullington, Barbara 
Dieterle, Doris 
Dotter, Pamela, B.S. 
Johnsen, Delores 



Bosco, Antoinette 
Cooke, C. Eloise 
Derr, Barbara 
Farmer, Rosemary 
Husted, Sally 



HEAD NURSES 

MEDICINE 

Collins, Ona, B.S. 
Curtis, Jane, B.S. 

SURGERY 

Lubowska, Nina 
McKeown, Elizabeth 
McNeer, Mary, A.B. 
Nelson, Jeanne 

OPERATING ROOM 

Karstetter, Cora 
Mantell, Virginia 
Milone, Marion 
Myers, Helen 
Philbrick, Olive 



Hiscox, Kathryn 
Joslyn, Joyce, B.S. 



Pruchnik, Blanche 
Rogers, Eleanor 
Tomasula, Theresa 



Ran, Rosalie, B.A. 
Rectanus, Dorothy 
Skoog, Alverna 
Torpey, Teresa 
Ward, Alberta 



OBSTETRICS AND GYNECOLOGY 



Bott, Alma 

Calder, Elizabeth, B.S. 
Colwell, Anna 
Connor, Agnes 
Dontzow, Jeanette, B.S. 



Ferrara, Lucia 
Hawtin, Clara 
Jackson, Dorothy 
Knox, Violet 
Mathews, Thelma 
Matus, Veronica 



Philla, Dorothy 
Rogers, Elva, B.S. 
Skinner, Margaret, B.A. 
Story, Mildred, B.S. 
Young, Kathleen 



OUT-PATIENT DEPARTMENT 



Carmody, Eileen, B.S. 
Clark, Evelyn 
DeWitt, Frances 
Friedman, Paula 
Geiger, Elizabeth 



Cantrell, Lois, B.S. 
Knapp, Dorothy 
Learn, Ruth 



Kinstler, Shirley 
Lambert, Lucille 
Liddle, Evelyn 
Long, Ilene 
Meachard, Delia 

PRIVATE PATIENTS 

Loughney, Eileen 
Meyerowitz, Claire, B.S. 
Pavy, Coy, B.A. 



Nussbaumer, Elsa 
Orlopp, Florence 
Riggs, Elise, A.B. 
Rouchleau, Margaret 
Wigsten, Mary 



Rasely, Elizabeth 
Shanahan, Frances, B.S. 
Smith, Helen 



ASSOCIATED WITH FACULTY 41 

PEDIATRICS 
Greenbaum, Ruth, M.N. Johnson, Nancy, B.S. Zemlock, Margaret 

PAYNE WHITNEY CLINIC (Psychiatry) 

Aubel, Helen, B.S. Lundgren, Grace Nelson, Marjoric 

Bristle, Louise McK.ee, Beatrice Pollack, Kathleen 

Ferguson, Phyllis Mellady, Elizabeth, B.S. Smith, Jane, B.S. 

Goodman, Gertrude, B.S. Morrison, Esther Weaver, Jessie 

Greenberg, Ruth, B.S. Moughton, Mona Wilson, Arlene 

NUTRITION DEPARTMENT 

Louise Stephenson, B.S., M.S., Director 
Anne Buteria, B.S. Elizabeth Richmond, B.S. 

Meredith Jones, B.S. Darlene Ross, B.S. 

Catherine Kellerman, B.S. Jeanne Tillotson, B.S. 

Susan Paice, B.S. Vera West, B.S. 

Virginia Pearson, B.S. 

PAYNE WHITNEY CLINIC 

Mildred Spargo Director, Occupational Therapy Department 

SOCIAL SERVICE DEPARTMENTS 

Theodate H. Soule, M.A Director, Main Hospital 

Virginia T. Kinzel Director, Woman's Clinic 

Melly Simon Director, Payne Whitney Clinic 

INSTITUTE OF CHILD DEVELOPMENT 

Eleanor Reich Head Teacher, Nursery School 

Eleanor Gardner Nursery School 

Jane Varian Nursery School 

Evelyn Wolff Occupational Therapy 

STAFF OF THE VISITING NURSE SERVICE 

Marion Randall, B.S., R.N Director 

and Staff 

ALUMNAE ASSOCIATION 

Theressa Sanman, B.S., R.N., '25 President 

COMMITTEE FOR SCHOLARSHIPS 

Mrs. Maurice Tingley Chairman 



Students in the School 3 



Name Class Home 

Affleck, May '50 Larchmont, N. Y. 

Archilla, Carmen '50 Mayaguez, Puerto Rico 

Benjamin, Betty J '51 Jersey City, N. J. 

Berg, Helen M '51 Floral Park, N. Y. 

Bielski, Mary Theresa '49 Philadelphia, Pa. 

Boynton, Nancy Theresa . . .'50 New Rochelle, N. Y. 

Briggs, Phyllis '50 Hampton, Iowa 

Brown, Shirley Irene '49 Scranton, Pa. 

Bunnell, Nancy '51 Westfield, N. J. 

Campbell, Susan G '51 Chicago, 111. 

Coates, Margaret E '51 Plainfield, N. J. 

Conner, Barbara Ann '50 Saco, Maine 

Conroy, Barbara Ann '50 Rutherford, N. J. 

Conway, Ronnie '51 East Hampton, N. Y. 

Cook, Victoria M '50 Chicago, 111. 

Coviello, Carolyn '51 Pleasantville, N. Y. 

Cowles, Marilyn M '50 Corning, N. Y. 

Dauphin, Arlene Kathryn. . '49 Savannah, 111. 

Dulin, Jean '51 Fly Creek, N. Y. 

Duncan, Alice E '50 Arlington, Va. 

Duvall, Grace '50 Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Dve, Julianne '51 Rochester, N. Y. 

Elliot, F. Eileen '51 Tenafly, N. J. 

Emerson, Faith G '50 Bridgeton, N. J. 

Epps, MarjorieWadsworth.'49 Chapel Hill, N. C. 

Ernest, Ruth '51 Bath, Pa. 

Feitner, Betty '51 Montclair, N. J. 

Ford, Jean Gretchen '51 Newton, N. J. 

Franklin, Shirley Irene '50 Oxford, N. Y. 

French, Jean Gilvey '49 Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Gallert, Anna Mae '51 Penn's Grove, N. J. 

Gault, Nancy Cox '50 Brookline, Mass. 

Gerhold, Vivian '51 Sidney, Ohio 

Goheen, Ruth Martin '50 Pine Plains, N. Y. 



From 

Wheaton College 

Polytechnic Institute, 
San German, Puerto 
Rico 

Connecticut College for 
Women 

Bucknell University 

Temple University 

Syracuse University 

Cornell College 

Temple University 

Grinnell College 

Oberlin College 

Wilson College 

University of New Hamp- 
shire 

New Jersey College for 
Women 

Elmira College 

Ohio Wesleyan Univer- 
sity 

Good Counsel College 

Elmira College 

Frances Shimer Junior 
College 

Cornell University 

George Washington Uni- 
versity 

Brooklyn College 

Stephens College 

Keuka College 

Ursinus College 

University of North Car- 
olina 

Temple University 

Green Mountain Junior 
College 

Elmira College 

New Jersey College for 
Women 

Brooklyn College 

Concordia Collegiate 
Institute 

University of Chicago 

Cornell University 

Cornell University 



including those graduating in September, 1949, but not those entering at that time. 

42 



STUDENTS 



43 



Name Class Home 

Gorenflo, Jo Anne R '51 Mt. Kisco, N. Y. 

Gregory, Ellen Louise '50 Chevy Chase, Md. 

Gurskey, Nancy Ann '50 Allentown, Pa. 

Hadley, Jeanne '50 Ocean City, N. J. 

Hale, Dorothy '51 Portland, Conn. 

Haley, Madeline '51 Chicago, 111. 

Hardy, Gertrude '49 Upper Darby, Pa. 

Harwood, Caryl Virginia. .'50 Rutherford, N.J. 

Hastings, Ann Bernice '49 Leonia, N. J. 

Hazeltine, Louise S '49 Trucksville, Pa. 

Henderson, Jane '51 East Orange, N. J. 

Holden, Susanne T '51 Ogdensburg, N. Y. 

Houston, Jean M '50 Shrewsbury, Mass. 

Hrouda, Margery E '50 Peekskill, N. Y. 

Johnson, Dorothy Ruth ... '50 Roselle Park, N. J. 

Jordan, Patricia Jean '49 Fanwood, N. J. 

Kcllv. Mary Grace '50 Elmira, N. Y. 

Kemper, Ruth '50 Cincinnati, Ohio 

Knuth, Virginia '49 Elmira, N. Y. 

Kozma, Constance '51 Ridgewood, N. J. 

Kurihara, Marie '50 New York, N. Y. 

Lagerquist, Elaine '51 Watertown, Conn. 

Lee, Carol '51 Baldwin, N. Y. 

Lee, June "51 Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Lehrbach, Mary Therese . .'49 Rochester, N. Y. 

Lesh, Elizabeth' May '49 Wind Gap, Pa. 

Lewis, Jane '51 Palmerton, Pa. 

MacKellar, Jean '49 River Edge, N. J. 

McCabe, Ellin Jeanne '50 Harrison, N. Y. 

McCarty, Joan '51 New Philadelphia, Ohio 

McKeown, Ann M .'51 Jackson Heights, N. Y. 

McKinlev, Barbara Anne. .'50 Cos Cob, Conn. 

McLellan, Eileen '50 Pelham, N. Y. 

Miller, Phyllis M '51 Lancaster, Pa. 

Nolt, Edith '50 Landisville, Pa. 

Noone, Eileen '50 Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Packer, Phvllis '49 Interlaken, N. Y. 

Palmer, Margaret M '50 Tully, N. Y. 

Peterson, Jane '49 Wethersfield, Conn. 

Promann, Ursula M '49 Weehawken, N.J. 

Riker, Joan '51 Plandome, N. Y. 

Rogers, Anne Bradley '49 Cleveland, Ohio 

Russo, Marie Antoinette. . .'49 Flushing, N. Y. 

Saltzman, Miriam '50 New York, N. Y. 

Sarno, Phyllis '50 Morehouse, Mo. 

Schmidt, Joan Wanda "49 Astoria, N. Y. 

Schmitz, Anna "51 Yonkers, N. Y. 

Schultz, Alma E "51 Washington, D. C. 

Seiler, Elizabeth '51 Glen Ridge, N. J. 

Shlimbaum, Prudence A. . .'49 Bay Shore, N. Y. 

Shore, Ann Treadwell '49 Hempstead, N. Y. 



From 

University of Michigan 

George Washington Uni- 
versity 

Cedar Crest College 

Cornell University 

Colby Junior College 

University of Illinois 

New Jersey College for 
Women 

Rutgers University 

New Jersey College for 
Women 

Bucknell University 

Ripon College 

College of St. Elizabeth 

Cornell University 

Concordia Collegiate In- 
stitute 

Elmira College 

Cornell University 

Elmira College 

University of Cincinnati 

Elmira College 

Furman University 

University of California 

Russell Sage College 

Cornell University 

Mary Baldwin College 

Cornell University 

Temple University 

Upsala College 

Cornell University 

Green Mountain Junior 
College 

Ohio University 

Hunter College 

L T niversity of Connecticut 

Mt. Holyoke College 

Cedar Crest College 

Temple University 

St. John's University 

Cornell University 

Cornell University 

Wheaton College 

Concordia Collegiate In- 
stitute 

Marymount College 

Briarcliff Junior College 

St. Mary of the Springs 

Queens College 

University of Missouri 

Hunter College 

Concordia Collegiate 
Institute 

Russell Sage College 

Green Mountain Junior 
College 

Elmira College 

Hood College 



44 



SCHOOL OF NURSING 



Name Class 

Sieber, Alice L '51 

Sifry, Rhoda '51 

Silver, Cecily '49 

Simpson, Gloria Ruth '49 

Stenvall, Audrey M '49 

Storandt, Jo Ellen '51 

Stover, Virginia '51 

Strouse, Nancy Jane '50 

Sturgis, Lillian Eloise '50 

Svendsen, Elsie '51 

Swann, Jean '50 

Swanwick, Joan E '50 

Sweeney, Claire Louise. . . .'51 
Tagliabue, Alma E '50 

Tease, Jean Wilson '50 

Tonks, Mary Lewellen . . . .'50 

Towne, Joyce Ann '50 

Van Arsdale, Martha L. . .'49 

von Thurn, Louise '50 

Wiedman, Janet '49 

Wilson, Patience '51 

Yelverton, Rebecca '50 



Home 

Frederic, Wis. 
New York, N. Y. 
Middle Village, N. Y. 
Ambler, Pa. 

Patchogue, N. Y. 

Middletown, Conn. 
Bucks County, Pa. 

Irvington, N. J. 
Ocala, Fla. 
Bellerose, N. Y. 
Elmira, N. Y. 
Devon, Conn. 
Middletown, N. Y. 
Bayville, N. Y. 

Rushland, Pa. 
Schenectady, N. Y. 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 
East Orange, N. J. 
Belmont, Mass. 
Kenmore, N. Y. 
Rowayton, Conn. 

Raleigh, N. C. 



From 

Macalester College 
Hunter College 
Queens College 
Pennsylvania State Col 

lege 
Concordia Collegiate In 

stitute 
Macalester College 
University of North Caro 

lina 

Centenary Junior College 
Duke University 
Luther College 
Augustana College 
Ohio University 
Cornell University 
Rensselaer Polytechnic 

Institute 
Temple University 
Antioch College 
Brooklyn College 
Hood College 
Middlebury College 
University of Buffalo 
Junior College of Con 

necticut 
Meredith College 



:'.'• 



:?e 



FORM OF BEQUEST 

Gifts or bequests to the School of Nursing may be made 
either to the University or the Hospital with a request that 
they be used for the School of Nursing, as follows: 

"/ give and bequeath to Cornell University (or "I give and 
bequeath to The Society of the New York Hospital") the 

sum of $ for use in connection with the 

Cornell University-New York Hospital School of Nursing." 

If it is desired that a gift shall be used in whole or in part 
for any specific purpose in the program of the School of 
Nursing such use may be specified. 



It is desirable that prospective applicants enroll with the school as 
early as possible so that they may receive assistance in planning their 
programs in high school and college to gain the best possible back- 
ground preparatory to entering the School of Nursing. 

Write to: Miss Virginia M. Dunbar, Dean 

Cornell University-New York Hospital School of Nursing 
525 East 68th Street, New York 21, N. Y. 



REQUEST FOR INFORMATION OR APPLICATION 

Please place my name on your mailing list so that I may receive information which 
will help me in planning my high school and college preparation for nursing school 
entrance. 



Name Date . 

Address 



Date of Birth 

High School: name and location, 



Date diploma received or expected. 
College: name and location 



Date on which I expect to have completed at least two years of college 

19 

Please send me an application blank (check if desired) 

(See page 12.) 



Index 



Accreditation of the school, 14 

Activities, 19; Nurses Residence, 19; 
Alumnae Association, 21; recreation, 
19; school government, 20; counsel- 
ing services, 20 

Administrative and teaching personnel, 
32-41 

Admission, requirements for, 10; appli- 
cation for, 12; credit requirements, 
11; educational requisites, 10 

Advanced standing, 13 

Age and health requirements, 10 

Aim of School of Nursing, 5 

Alumnae Association, 21, 41; Irene Sut- 
liffe Fund, 17 

American Red Cross, 39 

Anatomy, 22, 25 

Application for admission, 12 

Assistant Professors, 35 

Assistants in Administration, 33 

Assistants in Instruction, 38, 39 

Associate Professors, 34 

Associated with faculty, 38-41 

Bequest, form of, 45 
Biochemistry, 22, 25 
Biological and physical sciences, 25 

Calendar, 3 

Career opportunities in nursing, 4 

Clinical Pathology, 22, 25 

Clinics, 7-8 

Committee for Scholarships, 16, 41 

Communicable disease nursing, 22, 28 

Contents, 2 

Cornell University, 5, 6; degree, 13; 

Medical College faculty, 38 
Council of the School, 32 
Courses, description of, 25-31 
Credit requirements, 15 



Curriculum, 21; first year, 22; second 
year, 23; third year, 24 

Day, Edmund Ezra, chancellor, Cornell 

University, 32, 33, 34 
Degree, 13 

Description of courses, 25-31 
Development of Behavior in Children, 

23, 30 
Diet Therapy, 22, 23, 28 
Diploma, 13 
Dunbar, Virginia M., dean, School of 

Nursing, 32, 33, 34 

Educational requisites, 10, 11 
Emergency nursing, 24, 27 
Emeritus professors, 34 
Executive Faculty, 33 

Facilities for instruction, 7-9 

Faculty, 34-38; associated with, 38-41; 
committees of, 33 

Faculty Instructors, 35-37 

Family and community health, 24, 26 

Fees and expenses, 15; method of pay- 
ment, 13, 16 

Financial aid, 16, 17 

Graduation, 12; advanced standing, 13; 
degree and diploma, 13 

Head nurses, 41 

Health service, 17 

History, 5, 6 

History of Nursing, 23, 26 

Institute of Child Development, 41 

Joint Administrative Board, 32 

Lecturers, 39 

Libraries, 7 

Loan funds, 16, 17 



47 



48 



INDEX 



Maintenance, 16 

Medical Nursing, 22, 24, 28, 29 

Medical Nursing Principles, 22, 28 

Medicine, 22, 28 

Microbiology, 22, 25 

New York Hospital, 5, 6; supervisors, 
40; head nurses, 40, 41; staff, 39-41 

Nurses Residence, 7, 18, 19 

Nursing and allied arts, general, 27 

Nursing Arts I, 22, 27 

Nursing Arts II, 22, 27 

Nutrition, 28; department of, 41; Nutri- 
tion and Cookery, 22, 28 

Obstetric and Gynecological Nursing, 
23, 30; obstetrics and gynecology, 23, 
30 

Officers of Administration, 32 

Operative technique, 23, 30 

Orientation, 22, 27 

Out-Patient Departments, 8, 24, 26 

Payne Whitney Clinic, 8, 41 
Pediatric Nursing, 23, 30, 31 
Pediatrics, 23, 30, 31 
Personality growth and Development, 

22, 26 
Pharmacology I, 22, 27 
Pharmacology II, 22, 28 
Physical education, 22, 23, 25 
Physiology, 22, 25 
Private Patient Nursing, 24, 29 
Professional Adjustments I, 22, 26 
Professional Adjustments II, 24, 27 



Professors, 34 

Promotion and graduation, 12, 13; see 
Advanced standing, Degree, Diploma 
Psychiatric Nursing, 24, 31 
Psychiatry, 24, 31 
Public Health, 9, 24, 26 
Recreation, 19, 20 

Scholarships, 16, 17 

School government, 20 

School of Nursing, administrative of- 
ficers, 33; assistants in administration, 
33; faculty committees, 33 

Social and Health Aspects of Nursing, 
22, 26 

Social Sciences, 26 

Social service departments, 41 

State registration, 14 

Students now in school, 42-44 

Supervisors, 40, 41 

Surgery, 22, 29 

Surgical Nursing, 22, 24, 29, 30 

Surgical Nursing Principles, 22, 24, 29, 
30 

Tuition, 15 

Uniforms, 15 

Vacations and absences, 18 

Visiting Nurse Service of New York, 41 

Ward Activities and Relationships, 24, 

27 
W 7 hitney, John Hay, president, Board 

of Governors, 32 



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